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Hedge Fund Job Interview Questions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/12/hedge-fund-job-interview-questions-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 802 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the questions, “How would you fight a bear,” and, “How would you kill a giraffe?”

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about 2 of the 2 of the tough interview questions I get asked on Wall Street by hedge funds, investment banks, and other organizations of people at different levels for different kinds of roles. Hedge funds, in particular, have a reputation for asking tough/obnoxious interview questions. Today, I thought I would start off with "the 2 animal questions."

The 1st 1 is, "How would you find a bear?" What this has to do with being an investment banker, I have no idea. However, I think symbolically, the question is so out of left field they want to watch on your face response and how your body responds to the stress of dealing with something that has nothing to do extensively with the job but has everything to do with them understanding your personality makeup.

The correct answer to how you would find a bear is climb up on the Bears back and grab it by the neck so that the pause couldn't get at you. It's pretty obvious; you wouldn't punch in the mouth, would you? You try to get on its back and find it. From that position where paws can get out you.

The 2nd 1 is, "How would you kill a giraffe?" Again, ostensibly it is a question is nothing to do with the job. However, it is so bizarre they want to watch how you think. The correct answer to that one is you try to get on the back, climb up the neck until your weight snaps the giraffes neck and takes it to the ground. Horrible death of giraffe.

The answer isn't in your answer; it is about how you appear to be processing the answer.

What you need to be doing is using a little bit of acting again. You might just simply pause, smile (these firms love arrogance) and go, "Great question! What I would do is..." And you go right into the answer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Difference Between How You Deal With Recruiters and What C Level Pros Do


There is a very clear difference between how C level professionals deal with recruiters and how non-C suite professionals and non-professionals do. What are you doing wrong?

Summary

I was coaching someone this morning and it reminded me of something where I want to talk with you who are not executives, who are not in the C suite, in terms of how you deal with recruiters.

What I coach C level professionals, one thing is incredibly obvious. They treat every interview with the recruiter as though are an interview with the client. They prepare for it. They want to understand the job. They start researching their own background and how it meshes with where they have connections that can play into the organization that the search firm is doing the search for. They treated very seriously.

For most people, they don't work at that way. They view it as a nuisance and an inconvenience. Often, the the messages given, "They are wasting my time," or "They are getting in the way." They send all sorts of messages that in for nuisance an inconvenience. Sometimes, the contingency recruiters not seen as being as professional as the executive search firm. Sometimes, that is absolutely true. AND half and you don't know that going into the conversation; all you know is that you got a phone call or an email or an inMail talking about a particular search, maybe they are asking for help, and suddenly this is PAIN. Suddenly, you are whining and complaining vs. a C suite person who will offer a referral , make a suggestion to the search firm and prepare for the interview.

They get results and you get aggravation. They become successful the search was far more often than you do. What's the message in that?

Again, sometimes contingency recruiters are not competent. Sometimes, executive recruiters an optically competent either. You are times that executive search firms that in the contingency area AND it makes no difference.

One thing I want to leap in with is that sometimes those contingency firms are approached with racism.

"Some Indian firm called."

"Some Indian guy called."

Excuse me? I want to stop eating the tracks on that one. The fact that they have a particular national origin or from a particular nation and hired by a US firm to do recruiting for them? STOP IT. STOP IT!

Take a bias outside because you wind up being no different than any other bigot and cutting yourself off at the knees, even if they are a very junior individual and from a nation other than yours, no matter where in the world they are, does not make them incompetent, rude, or worse.

Slow down and work on creating a great impression. It is what executives and people in the C suite do.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/15/salary-negotiation-advice-for-executives-3/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Summary

I just want this speak with you and say that if you're working with a recruiter, I know this may be hard, but you just have to trust them to do the job. That job and I'm speaking of is to do the negotiation for you.

You get to the point where you have the offer or on the run up to the offer. There are 2 different approaches – – one from the contingency side, the other from the retained search side.

I think the retained search side finds it less difficult to do the negotiation. On the contingency side, there is a certain panic involved because there is that much more money that is involved in the way of a commission. Often, with a contingency recruiter, the relationship may not be as strong as it is with the retained recruiter. Again, knowing the relationship that your representation has with the client is going to be a big help to you.

Let's assume it is a contingency recruiter and you are on the run up phase and they ask, "So, how much are you looking for, again? I want to make sure I have the numbers right." By now, you should have an idea of how much you be looking for based upon what you know about the job, what you know in the way of comparables for people like you... I'm not talking about those broad salary ranges (just to pick arbitrary numbers) like $200,000-$275,000. Everywhere there's a $275,000, knowing here's the $200,000 and so they know your here's all the numbers in the middle. Recognize that that is a pretty broad range. You want to get more targeted.

When the recruiter starts to talk you down as often, they will try to do, that may be a signal that they already know what the hiring firm is going to propose. You can cut right through. "Have you spoken with the firm? What's the number they are talking about? Let's just go right to it." This way, you can start working for the case as to why they have to up the number and why they have to represent you to up the number.

When push comes to shove, you may already know that they offer $245,000, you will take it. They don't need to know that. You have to push for the biggest number because at this point, what they are trying to do is squeeze you into that pocket that your client has been trying to wedge you into and that may not necessarily serve your needs.

Again, given the idea that you're going to do this and is going to generate this amount of money. Save this amount of money. At the end of the day, the client may not necessarily shift AND you may go directly to the client. Initially, following the old Nixon proverb, trust but verify. You have to do a certain amount of trust because they represent you up until this point, you want them to represent you, across the finish line.

If you get to a point where the client hasn't budged asked them to schedule one more conversation for you. They will ask, "What's the intention?".

"I would just like to talk with them before I make my decision. It's a tough choice for me; it's important choice for me. I want to make sure I have all the information I need to make my decision."

Notice how noncommittal that is? You don't want to necessarily give the idea to the contingency recruiter that you will take the offer if the client doesn't budge. You want to get them to move a little bit And get them a little bit more flexible.

On the retained side, like I said, you can lay out the case more directly because they tend to be more forthright because they have less money at stake. Again, because of how you present it, you're always driving to the highest number. You don't have to be "nice." At this point, in the run up phase, they may have an idea of the number that is being proposed; they may not. Normally they will. Just go right to it.

"What's the number that they are talking about?"

You can respond by saying, "That's not going to be enough for me. I'm going to need them to make that 2nd number a such and such," and work from there. Start working through them and then again, go directly to the firm for one conversation. The ideal is if you walk in, but often that is not appropriate.
Skype, FaceTime, a phone call... However, works for you and them, set up one less conversation and then go for the close.

However, in situations where there is a retained search firm involved, be prepared to say yes or no on the spot. You don't want to let it dangle one because often offers are rescinded.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Treating It As Though There Is a Two Way Street

EP 866 This is one of the dumbest mistakes people make when they interview– not treating the interview like a two-way street.

Summary

The mistake I want to call attention to is stupid. It is not treating the interview like it is a two-way street. I understand that for a lot of you when you are young, there is the tendency to think of your potential hiring manager, your potential boss, as though they are some demi-deity looking down their nose at you, making it seem like they are superior to you. That could be furthest from the truth.

What the trying to do is evaluate and assess you. Most of them are not feeling as though they are high and powerful and all that sort of nonsense. Think of it from the standpoint that you have rights of the interview, too. You want to know what their expectations of you are, what the job is good be like, what it's like working there and need to arrive with some questions. After you answer something that they ask you about, you might just simply ask, "How does that fit into the role?" In this way, you can learn more about the job as you answer their questions.

For example, they ask you something, you answer and continue by saying, "How is that involved with the job that you are hiring me for?" They will tell you about it and it makes perfect sense. If it doesn't, you have learned something about them and that is useful to you.

Everything needs to be about you learning information about them as much as they learning about you. You need to understand what you will be stepping into in the way of a role, its responsibilities and have successful be measured. I want to come back to that one – – how success will be measured.

It's funny how often I talk to people who think success in the job is about one thing when it is about something completely different. Don't sell yourself short. Don't put yourself in the position where they are the powerful ones and you feel like a loser. Where they are up high and powerful and you feel weak and passive.

No one likes week people during dating; we want to talk to people who relate to at that doesn't involve superior-subordinate situations. The same thing is true on an interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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