How to Answer, “Tell Me About Yourself” (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers the most effective way to prepare for this question so you are never tripped up.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the classic job interview question, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally."

They may not use those exact words but you're probably going to ask you some general open-ended question that will allow you to take the ball and the other run with it or trip yourself up. To run with it, you need to be prepared with an answer that lasts about 30-45 seconds that speaks to the nature of the job that the trying to fill, as well as demonstrate that you can do it.

Here's a typical answer that question.

"Well, I've been in the field now for about (whatever the number of years is). For the last 2 years I been working for someone. So I've done this that this that." The listen that that you talk about is exactly what they're looking for (or pretty darn close). If they are trying to find a Java developer with certain skills, you tell them what you've done that relates to what you're looking for.

You see, they're not looking for some big overview. They're looking for fits into what they need to have done.

If your accountant, you might say something along the lines of, "I've been accountant for the last 5 years. For the past 3 years I been doing temporary assignments for different organizations where I have been involved with…" Then talk about what you've done the relates to what you're looking for. It's really that simple.

Once you give them this outline, once you've rehearsed it, instead of giving them this "winged answer," off the top of your head . . . You really should rehearse it . . . Once you have it rehearsed, if you are them, what follow-up questions would you ask in order to find out whether what you've done fits with what they're looking for? Once you have that in mind, you can be prepared with your follow-up answers to their follow-up questions. It's really pretty easy.

But most people go into interviews completely unprepared. They think they can just walk in and answer off-the-cuff (and they can) but they're not to get hired.

My encouragement to you is for the 1st 10-15 minutes of the interview is some variation on the question of, "Tell me about yourself," where you talk about what you've done. They want to find out what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. There are also going to ask you follow-up questions that you can also be prepared for.

Keep your answers to about 30-45 seconds in length. Why? You don't want to be droning on and on and on and on and on and boring them to tears so they are left mentally starting to channel surf (thinking about something else that they would rather be doing). You want to be giving your answers in 30 to 45 seconds in length so that the conversation becomes interactive. You engage them. They engage you. You are going back and forth in this is what you want to have happening at the stage of the interview.

So, again, "tell me about yourself," is a really simple question to answer if you have taken the time to prepare.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Being a Real Leader on Job Interviews | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/09/10/being-a-real-leader-on-job-interviews-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 861 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out the false “Hollywood Leadership Model,” defines what leadership really is and encourages you to show it on your interviews.

Summary

Today I want to talk with you about expressing your leadership on interviews.  Some people have the silly idea that people are born leaders, they are completely charismatic. It's like they walk into a room and the seas part and the heavens open up… And it's wrong.

In point of fact, most leaders are individuals who are passionate about what they do, can make a case for themselves and cause people to suddenly say, "I want to follow them."  Let me give you an example.

Whether you like his politics were not Pres. Obama is someone (communicated case out of his life) who, as teenager,  got high regularly, didn't show up for classes and is now president of the free world.  Is it they just hypnotized people along the way?  I don't think so.  Along the way, he exhibited qualities that cause people to trust him, unlike him and respect him.  There have certainly been a lot of people who have said, "No," to him along the way.  Yet, there was a and perseverance and determination about him that brought him to where he is today.

Again, let's not get into the politics.  I'm talking about the personal qualities the man has.

So, when you are interviewing, what is a firm looking for?  I talked about competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry, charisma, personal leadership.  This is the part of the conversation I'm having with you weren't talking with you about complete belief, your complete self-confidence. And, understand, people will say no to you.  It's not as though, again, the heavens will part and the seas will open up.  You need to display qualities that cause people to trust you, to have belief in you and have belief that you are the solution to a problem.  How do you do that?

I was listening to a podcast recently where Seth Godin was talking about You have no answers.  Most people walk into interviews and they are arrogant and they can tell an employer what they are doing wrong.  You 1st have to listen.  One may ask you, "How do you think you can help us," answer, "I don't know.  What problems do you have?  What issues do you have?  What have you tried so far?  I don't want to presume I know anything about your environment and make suggestions to you that are pointless.  You know, far more about this than I do.  Tell me what you have done so far.  Tell me what I can help you with."  Big difference in attitude!  My encouragement to you is to be someone who inspires confidence. Be the leader that you can be.

I was listening to a podcast recently where Seth Godin was talking about the ASPCA which most people don't know was originally an organization that puts animals to sleep.  Through the efforts of one person whose name I don't recall right now, they 1st set up a trial in San Francisco of no kill.  This man, who fought hard for this was supposed every step along the way.  He was nondescript. He was the antithesis of what in our Hollywood style culture is seen as a leader.  But he had faith, determination and persistence in him, that even though opponents flew in in the early 20th century to oppose his opinions, he still worked at it and persisted and eventually found the group of individuals to support them.  Eventually made that trial environment in San Francisco work.

He then took it elsewhere.. All the while he was the individual who was nondescript and, again, not exactly the image of a leader.  However, he became a leader.  He became someone who inspired belief in his ideas.  You can do that to you and you need to show that on your interviews.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Tell Them What I Earn? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/09/should-i-tell-them-what-i-earn-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio/

EP 388 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses whether to disclose your salary during an interview.

Summary

I have one of those questions and someone asked me. Would it be a bad idea to be upfront about what I am getting paid in a job interview? They want to know whether they should disclose what their current earnings are.

To be clear, you generally have 2 choices-- not to disclose is the advice many coaches. The issue is that for many salary levels, the issue becomes disclose or if you don't the interview is over. The advice normally is don't disclose, because you get boxed in to a number and the range and their expectations are going to be lower if you. On the other hand, like I said, if you don't disclose, often firms respond by saying, "Tell us or this interview is over." You become stuck. That power differential that firms can exercise becomes heavily weighted on their side.

What I would say is if you do choose to disclose as friendly for most of you I think you should, the response has to be, "Now that I've said that. What is the salary range for this position?" If they choose not to disclose, then you pause for a 2nd and say, "So let me get this straight. I told you I'm earning but you're not prepared to tell me what this position is prepared to pay? I understand that there is a range for the role and I may not be qualified for the top number. What's the issue with disclosing the range for the job?" At that point, be quiet.

Let them squirm. At the end of the day, you learn something about this firm from their behavior. That's really important because individuals make the mistake of not paying attention to signals that employers give. After all, if this person who is probably in HR individual is unwilling to disclose, this suggests the command-and-control culture that you may or may not want to be involved with. Frankly, for me personally, I like being involved with command-and-control cultures. It's top-down management where you are expected to execute a task and you are not expected to think or offer ideas. That's not my idea of a particularly attractive environment. Maybe it's yours. But it's not mine.

If they are willing to disclose, you learn something about them that I think is very human and natural. You met them and you are looking for them to meet you with the answer to this question. That's fair. At the end of the day, like I said, you may be in a situation where you are not qualified for the high-end of the range.

Picking numbers arbitrarily, the range may be $135,000-$150,000 plus bonus. Understand that they could pay you $135,000, they could pay you $150,000, and there are many numbers between these 2 that they could also pay you.

When all is said and done, not disclosing carries risk. Disclosing really doesn't because firms are going to box you in any way. Better to make it easy and trade information with them and, like I said, if they don't want to trade, you have learned something really valuable.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Interviews Die.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why interviews die and what you can do to avoid t him him him hat from happening.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about why interviews die.

You know, you're sitting with the employer and you just have that sinking feeling like this is a huge fail.

There are number of reasons why they fail. The 1st 1 is because the hiring manager reviewed your resume and interpreted something you wrote that you didn't intend it to say. That mistake is from the employer standpoint. That's not your fault. Sometimes, they read things into your resume and wish and hope and think and pray that maybe you have that particular experience. And, you know, within 5 minutes. Everyone knows that you don't have the background that they are looking for.

Another reason is that is your fault. Sometimes, you overstated skill or experience or success, and, if you desire to get that interview, you oversold yourself. That's your fault.

You wasted your time. You wasted someone else's time. I have that happen in resumes all the time. People send resumes and they really don't have the experience that the resume suggests I can tell within 2 minutes at that is the case. I just get them off the phone fast.

Don't overstate what you can do. By the same token, don't understated. Just be accurate.

Sometimes , "fail because, frankly, the interviewer gets lost in the thought. They have other things on their plate and interviewing is 1 of 25 things they may have, to contend with on a given day. So, for whatever the reason, the timing wasn't right for the interview. You are stuck sitting there or trying to talk with them and realize pretty quickly that you've lost them attention.

Finally, this 1 is your fault, you are boring. They ask you a question, you never organize your thoughts around this topic and you go off and drone on and are absolutely awful and how you present your ideas. You give long-winded answers to questions that need to be answered in 35 to 45 seconds.

What can you do to avoid this? The easiest thing is to ask them about the role that you're going to be interviewing for. Just don't accept the interview. Asked him to talk with you about the job and exploring a bit. This way, if they are projecting experience onto you that you don't have, you can investigate further and say, "I really haven't done what you're looking for. This is what I have done. Does that work for you?" If they say, "no," you save everyone a bunch of time.

Another thing you can do is don't exaggerate. Lay out exactly what you know and what you've done. Exaggeration just put you in the position of wasting a lot of folk's time.

If you get a sense that the interviewer is often thought (if you're in a phone interview this is a really easy one), this is one trick – – cough. Doing a quick cough will jolt them back to attention. If you are in an in person interview, shift your position a little bit and that will get them back.

To avoid droning on, pay attention. Here the question if you are in person and stay on point. If you're doing this over the phone. Very simply, shut down the question on a slip of paper (you do have your resume in front of you for a phone interview, don't you). Johnson notes down on your resume and let that remind you how to stay on point.

Finally, keep your answers to 30 to 45 seconds. Where possible. What I found is that when people go over 45 seconds. The interviewer starts to mentally "channel surf" and start thinking about other thoughts other than you. Keep your answers brief and to the point and. You'll find that you not going to wind up losing them.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about why interviews die.

You know, you're sitting with the employer and you just have that sinking feeling like this is a huge fail.

There are number of reasons why they fail. The 1st 1 is because the hiring manager reviewed your resume and interpreted something you wrote that you didn't intend it to say. That mistake is from the employer standpoint. That's not your fault. Sometimes, they read things into your resume and wish and hope and think and pray that maybe you have that particular experience. And, you know, within 5 minutes. Everyone knows that you don't have the background that they are looking for.

Another reason is that is your fault. Sometimes, you overstated skill or experience or success, and, if you desire to get that interview, you oversold yourself. That's your fault.

You wasted your time. You wasted someone else's time. I have that happen in resumes all the time. People send resumes and they really don't have the experience that the resume suggests I can tell within 2 minutes at that is the case. I just get them off the phone fast.

Don't overstate what you can do. By the same token, don't understated. Just be accurate.

Sometimes , "fail because, frankly, the interviewer gets lost in the thought. They have other things on their plate and interviewing is 1 of 25 things they may have, to contend with on a given day. So, for whatever the reason, the timing wasn't right for the interview. You are stuck sitting there or trying to talk with them and realize pretty quickly that you've lost them attention.

Finally, this 1 is your fault, you are boring. They ask you a question, you never organize your thoughts around this topic and you go off and drone on and are absolutely awful and how you present your ideas. You give long-winded answers to questions that need to be answered in 35 to 45 seconds.

What can you do to avoid this? The easiest thing is to ask them about the role that you're going to be interviewing for. Just don't accept the interview. Asked him to talk with you about the job and exploring a bit. This way, if they are projecting experience onto you that you don't have, you can investigate further and say, "I really haven't done what you're looking for. This is what I have done. Does that work for you?" If they say, "no," you save everyone a bunch of time.

Another thing you can do is don't exaggerate. Lay out exactly what you know and what you've done. Exaggeration just put you in the position of wasting a lot of folk's time.

If you get a sense that the interviewer is often thought (if you're in a phone interview this is a really easy one), this is one trick – – cough. Doing a quick cough will jolt them back to attention. If you are in an in person interview, shift your position a little bit and that will get them back.

To avoid droning on, pay attention. Here the question if you are in person and stay on point. If you're doing this over the phone. Very simply, shut down the question on a slip of paper (you do have your resume in front of you for a phone interview, don't you). Johnson notes down on your resume and let that remind you how to stay on point.

Finally, keep your answers to 30 to 45 seconds. Where possible. What I found is that when people go over 45 seconds. The interviewer starts to mentally "channel surf" and start thinking about other thoughts other than you. Keep your answers brief and to the point and. You'll find that you not going to wind up losing them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: The Country Club Question

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers and he answer to this question that is designed to see whether you have self-confidence.

Summary

I have another 1 of those fun tough interview questions for you today. Here's how it goes: "You're invited to a party at the country club. As a matter of fact, you are 1 of over 200 people who has been invited. At the time you walk in the door, more than half the people are there. How do people react when you walk in?"

Isn't that a fun one?

The ideas that they want to get a sense of your self-confidence. So, certainly, the correct answer is NOT, I want to repeat, NOT to say, "No one is going to notice me because of very unimportant."

Instead, you provide an answer that demonstrates that you have self-confidence.

The correct answer is actually the honest one.

"Some people would see me and some wouldn't. After all, they are engaged in conversation. It's not like I am The Great Gatsby and people stop in their tracks and started dancing around me and music starts playing, and the party swings in my direction! It's nothing like that. There a lot of people would walk over to me and try get my attention and begin a conversation with me."

That's the most simple and fun way to respond to that question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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