Avoid Premature Negotiation and Other Negotiation Tips

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with a few salary negotiation tips to help you when you receive your offer.

Summary

When all is said and done, some people start negotiating from the get go. All that happens is you piss off the interviewers because all they think you are in there to do is negotiate, negotiate, negotiate while they are there to evaluate and assess you.

Your initial job is to make them fall in love because as I've said many times, no love, no money, no honey. You don't get the opportunity to go to work at these places. If, at the end of the day, you don't prove your value to them. . Thus, the 1st thing is to make them fall in love because then they are more willing to negotiate. That is step number 1. Avoid premature negotiation issues.

2. Once you get the offer, that's when the negotiating really should start. You wait until the offer has been made. Some people start negotiating, thinking that the economy is booming when it isn't or they stop negotiating when it is booming because they think it isn't. You have to know the climate that you are operating in in order to know whether you will have an opportunity to really move the needle on the salary part of the offer.

3. This is something that students are often told-- don't negotiate just for the sake of it. I respectfully disagree. I want you to try negotiating and see if you can up the number. Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." It is a very simple and gentle approach to negotiating that won't piss anyone off. That's the 2nd thing.

4. Don't forget that if you are negotiating with the small to midsize firm, there are benefits that you might be able to negotiate. For example, there is that Masters program that you want to take. See if you can negotiate tuition reimbursement as a part of your offer. Big companies won't negotiate this kind of stuff. It's either in their policies and procedures or not because, from their vantage point, they are trying to avoid lawsuits.

After all, just to use an example, if you are the white heterosexual male and they did for you, why did they not give this concession to the non-white heterosexual male and they gave it to you. It becomes a lawsuit in the making. Big firms don't negotiate. Small companies may in some midsize firms will if there policies and procedures are not completely in place. Don't forget to negotiate some of the secondary items and just focus on salary.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Tell Me Something Negative You’ve Heard About Our Company (VIDEO)


Here is a slippery question that some companies ask. There are very few good ways to do it; here, I offer several.

Summary

I worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years filling more than 1200 positions plus consulting assignment for my career. One thing I know is that people do damage to the candidacy when they are not prepared for interview questions.

On this podcast, I am spending all 2017 helping people prepare for how to answer tough interview questions. This is 1 of those questions are requested is kind of seductive. "Tell me something negative you've heard about our company," is the question.

If this firm is in the press, you can't say, "I haven't heard anything about your firm." You seem like a jerk. Sometimes the firm is looking for reconnaissance like, "What's the scuttlebutt about us?" When push comes to shove, there is no way of winning that one.

There are a few suggested ways.
1. If they are in the media for something negative, you can respond by saying, "I have read some press accounts… Who want to read these press accounts? They're all over the media these days. It's obvious that the firm has some struggles but that opens up some opportunities for someone like me to step up and make a difference." That's for someone in a leadership role. 1st, after all, you can do something similar. You can conclude by saying, "But it offers a challenge for me joy is the staff individual.. It offers a challenge to contribute and be a strong performer and change some of the public perception of the organization."
2. If there is nothing you are able to research about the firm online, you can say, "I have is anything current about your organization. It's not like them out there trying to say,' Okay, tell me everything bad you've heard about the firm.' I asked some friends who have some opinions about your firm, did a quick Google search. Everything seems to be in order. Nothing here to scare me or anyone else." Just let it go at that.

Going to any sort of detail, even if you have heard something from a friend or from a former employee, is a bad signal. They don't really want to hear it. All it does is make them concerned as to whether you accept an offer if they made it to you.

Skirt answering the question and do it in a very casual way. Avoid going into any sort of detail. You will do fine answering.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Making a Career Pivot? The Most Important Areas of Your LinkedIn Profile


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Your LinkedIn profile is skewered toward your past. You want to make a pivot but your history doesn’t support it., What are the most important areas of your profile, given that you want to make a pivot.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about those of you are trying to make a career pivot or a career change about using LinkedIn a little differently than you have been conditioned to use it. When you are creating a profile or have created a profile on LinkedIn, often. It is a recitation of your past, rather than an indication of your aspirations or desires for the future.

For example, I worked in executive search for more than 40 years and may depend it into being a coach. Part of the work that I do is around executive job search coaching; part of it relates to life and business coaching. I'm self-employed (I have a corporate entity that I can frame in this way) and if I left my profile intact. For you who is an employee wants to remain an employee of the firm, but pivot to something else, there is a problem here. The problem is that your bio is a recitation of your past rather than a presentation of your future, right?Here are the 2 areas on your LinkedIn profile that are most critical for you and then make a recommendation to you for the remainder of your profile.

To me, the 2 most important areas of your LinkedIn profile if you're making a pit are (1) the line underneath your name where you can talk about what it is you want to be doing and not continue with that statement of what your past was. The other one is (2) the summary area of your LinkedIn profile, where they give you a lot of space to talk about yourself. When you do so, remember that when firms are searching LinkedIn, they think in terms of keywords. You want to use relevant terms for your aspiring industry or field so that when people or firms are searching for someone like what you want to be, they can find you.

In addition, you want to make it easy for them to reach out to you. You don't want them spending the equivalent of $12 or $15 to send an inMail to you. If you are not connected to them. You want to make it easy for them. Put your email address and phone number in the summary area so that they have the ability to reach out to you.

Finally, for your older information, for the stuff that you done up until this point, think about minimizing it,if not eliminated if it is not relevant to what you want to be and what you want to be doing. Think about from the standpoint of the employer. If you think that the work that you've done is going to benefit them, you want to continue to included under each firm that you've worked for eliminated the extraneous. Speak of relevant information for the employer (let me use myself as an example) for my work as a coach. I would go into my background where I evaluate and assess people, advising businesses on improving operations and being more efficient might be part of the work I would convey for my time is being a headhunter that could be useful to a firm now.

You have your equivalent and you always want to be thinking in terms of what a firm wants to know about you and your past that your LinkedIn profile can address and eliminate the rest. I'm sure this is counterintuitive for a lot of you but minimize it, if not eliminate, all the unnecessary text altogether.

To be clear, I'm not saying to take out the jobs or lie. I'm trying to tell you that you always need to be thinking in terms of speaking to employers and so much of what you have done is relevant to what you want to be doing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Getting More LinkedIn Connections | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple ways to get more LinkedIn connections.

Summary

One of the bashful places that people have is not doing enough to promote your LinkedIn identity.

You send out emails to people, right? Why don't you have a link to your profile, there? It can say something as simple as, "Connect with me on LinkedIn." In bed the link in your signature.

You have a business card? Don't have one? Why not? If you have a business card, but your LinkedIn profile there. It becomes another way that people can find you. Connect with me on LinkedIn have a bit.ly link next to it with how to find you. You could also have a QR code that allows people to connect with your LinkedIn profile on the back side of your card.

However you do it, just put out your LinkedIn profile, in more places will invite more connections. Even if you if you hand the card out to someone that you meet at a meetup, your LinkedIn profile or to be there So the people know how to find you later on and follow you and connect with you.

Whether you are in, job search mode actively now or you are at your new job, have them include your profile link on your new card. In this way, you're building up more connections, able to create more business for them of course, those connections become the basis of relationship building for many years to come.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

 

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Squeeze Bottles | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 854 What does a brownie with ice cream and a job interview having common?

Summary

Have you ever had a brownie with ice cream on it?  I hope you have because it is 1 of the most wonderful things in the world to enjoy! I love a good brownie, preferably warm, with ice cream on top. For me it's chocolate ice cream.  Maybe for you, it is vanilla.

There is a difference between the brownie and ice cream you have at home and the one that you have in a restaurant. What do you think the difference is?

The answer is a squeeze bottle.

A squeeze bottle where they have  chocolate sauce in it that they can use to decorate the plate and the ice cream, as well-- A drizzle of chocolate sauce that can make the dish look that much more appealing.

How about a steak?  Have you ever had a steak and potatoes somewhere (My apologies to you vegetarians.  If I have brought up a sore subject for you)? You can make a steak at home  and I'm sure it will be wonderful. When you go to a restaurant,, they will decorate the plate in particular ways that just make it that much more interesting. Everything around that steak just looks magnificent. That's the difference.

So many of you just sell the steak Meaning who you are and what you can do. You don't think in terms of "the sizzle."

Have you ever been to a restaurant where there is some flamboyance dish that is served? I remember when I was younger.  It was the pu-pu platter at the Chinese restaurant.

Maybe was the dish that came out on the sizzling plate.  Ooooooh!  Such drama!

They charged a premium for it and we loved it! We enjoyed it!

You can do the same thing at home..

When you are job hunting, when you are in your career and trying to market and promote yourself, don't just simply market yourself for what you can do.  Think of the sizzle and the excitement that you can create around what you can deliver to them.

For example, if you're an executive interviewing for a role, Is not simply enough to talk about your accomplishments..  You need to talk about the impact on people and how they delighted in your work. They expressed such excitement about it.

Maybe you have a webpage or LinkedIn profile that calls attention to some of the comments you've received. Maybe you start painting the picture of what the plate might look like if you came on board at their firm.

Remember, always be out there selling and not just simply delivering  "facts." Facts are good up to a point but we eat with their eyes and not just simply with our mouth.

Think about how they can eat with their eyes when they interview you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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