How Do I Deal With a Fly In Interview In The Future | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/14/how-do-i-deal-with-a-fly-in-interview-in-the-future-no-bs-job-search-advice-ra

EP 804 I respond to someone’s fly in interview gone terribly wrong.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I received a message today from someone who posed a scenario asked different opinion. He has done a phone interview and is told that it will is a technicality for the client wanting to meet him. The recruiter tells him he needs to pay the airfare and travel and that if he is offered the job and takes it, he will be paid back for the trip.
Let’s read between the lines. You lay out the money. If you get the job, I will pay you back. If you don’t get the job, you will get nothing.
When he asks about what happens if they don’t select me, the recruiter says that this is for sure them to stop talking negatively. Like I said, the recruiter is going to pay him back if he gets the job and if he doesn’t get the job, he is out of luck.
Everything sounds find any books a flight from one city to Atlanta and rents a car. The night before, he goes to a friend’s wedding and he is on a 3 AM flight the next morning. Let’s get practical. He knows the guy for long time. It’s a big decision to go to the wedding, but he is only 3 AM flight so his at the airport at [1:30] AM. He is sleep deprived when he lands; he has an interview going on for in the long and the short of it is, he doesn’t get the job. His body just wants to get to sleep and he didn’t perform on the interview.
He tells the recruiter what happens. I want to explain it to the company. “I don’t even care about the expenses.” The company doesn’t want to talk to him; the recruiter has no interest. The company doesn’t want to talk to him. At the end of the day, he asks this question, “Is it a good deal to go on these fly outs prepaid? Does it come across stronger to say that I want half the money up front? Is it worth taking the risk of the client not paying up front?” He is looking for a way to protect themselves.
Here’s my thinking.
1. If you have a wedding the night before, it isn’t like the wedding wasn’t on the schedule when the interview showed up, right? You knew about that before hand and you miscalculated. As a result, you will that going out sleep deprived. That has nothing to do with whether or not you are going to get paid back. That has to do with you making a mistake
2. The way you handle this in the future is that you don’t put yourself in the position where you are going to be sleep deprived and unable to perform. This is nothing to do with the money. This has to do with you.
You didn’t deliver the goods on the interview and who would want to pay for you to have an excursion to stink up the joint. At the end of the day, what you could’ve done is say, “I can’t do Monday. I can do Tuesday. I have plans on Sunday that I cannot change. Tuesday I can be there on an early morning flight.” Do you know what you could have also done? You could go out Monday afternoon for a Tuesday interview, get a good nights sleep in a hotel and then walk in refreshed.
Instead, you made a mistake. People make mistakes and you ask for my advice… I give no BS advice. In the future, don’t put it back to back like this on yourself. You’ve already demonstrated that you can’t deliver under these circumstances; don’t do it again.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Treating It As Though There Is a Two Way Street

EP 866 This is one of the dumbest mistakes people make when they interview– not treating the interview like a two-way street.

Summary

The mistake I want to call attention to is stupid. It is not treating the interview like it is a two-way street. I understand that for a lot of you when you are young, there is the tendency to think of your potential hiring manager, your potential boss, as though they are some demi-deity looking down their nose at you, making it seem like they are superior to you. That could be furthest from the truth.

What the trying to do is evaluate and assess you. Most of them are not feeling as though they are high and powerful and all that sort of nonsense. Think of it from the standpoint that you have rights of the interview, too. You want to know what their expectations of you are, what the job is good be like, what it's like working there and need to arrive with some questions. After you answer something that they ask you about, you might just simply ask, "How does that fit into the role?" In this way, you can learn more about the job as you answer their questions.

For example, they ask you something, you answer and continue by saying, "How is that involved with the job that you are hiring me for?" They will tell you about it and it makes perfect sense. If it doesn't, you have learned something about them and that is useful to you.

Everything needs to be about you learning information about them as much as they learning about you. You need to understand what you will be stepping into in the way of a role, its responsibilities and have successful be measured. I want to come back to that one – – how success will be measured.

It's funny how often I talk to people who think success in the job is about one thing when it is about something completely different. Don't sell yourself short. Don't put yourself in the position where they are the powerful ones and you feel like a loser. Where they are up high and powerful and you feel weak and passive.

No one likes week people during dating; we want to talk to people who relate to at that doesn't involve superior-subordinate situations. The same thing is true on an interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Knowing When to Shut Up | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 846 When I did recruiting, this mistake drove me crazy!  It cost too many people way too many opportunities.  

Summary

I have interviewed a lot of people in my career. When I worked in search, I'm not sure what it was just over three quarters of a million people that I interviewed. They were interviews that I conducted with people were I just want to put a bullet in my head. Why? Because this person just didn't know when to shut up. They just kept selling way too hard way too long, not knowing when they were scoring points with me and just feeling compelled to over-talk the situation. I will tell you, folks, if you've ever been on the same side is me in a situation like that, you know exactly what I'm talking about.

For you job hunters, consider the following: the attention span and most interviews is between 30 and 60 seconds. After that, most interviewers stop listening and start to "mentally channel surf." As a result, if you start talking for longer than 60 seconds, you're going to be putting them to sleep.

I encourage most people talk from no one than 45 seconds; for most of you that's close to the outer limit. If you are skillful with your voice and know how to pause at times, and you suggested you are thinking (or know how to fake that you're thinking of your answer), and you can be theatrical without being DRAMATIC (no one cares for hysteria in an interview), or uber drama . . . what they are looking for is answers to the question that demonstrates fit and be entertained in the process which is why you always hear about stories being affected but an interview.

Keep your answers down to about 45 seconds in life. AT TOPS, for skillful people, you go to 1 minute and 15 seconds. Otherwise, you're putting your foot in your mouth and kill your candidacy.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Following Directions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/11/stupid-interview-mistakes-not-following-directions

EP 832 This is a mistake that hangs too many people.

Summary

I wanted to discuss 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that you many people do. It's the notion of not following directions. The obvious places you have a job application and they tell you to do certain things with the application and you don't follow through. For example, I think 1 of the funniest things that I've ever heard of that someone did (a client told me about this 1) is the place of their application where it said, "Give us one word that describes your strengths." One word! Got that one? They wrote, "I'm very good at following directions."

Was that one word? Was that really one word? Of course, not. This person didn't pay attention.

You see, what happens to a lot of job hunters is that they go on autopilot. They don't really listen. They built so many interviews that what happens is that they think they know what the question is, but they don't do it. They don't answer the question. They anticipate with this person is really looking for without really knowing what they are looking for. That shows up on applications in that way. It also shows up as you "basking your own magnificence" as you answer questions.

I mentioned this will many times before, the person who went off on this lengthy answer that had nothing to do with my question, but it got to a point where I said, "By the way, do you member what my original question was?" The answer, which I thought was wonderfully honest, was, "No."

You just have to follow directions. He answer the stupid question that is presented to you, whether is on the application or on an interview. That's what they are looking for at that point. In the therapy business, is referred to as, "following the contact function." They are reaching out to you about something, they want to know that answer, you can guide them with your answer to the next part but the idea is just give them what they want. Do it in your particular way.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: What Was The Question, Again?

EP 818 People make so many stupid interview mistakes.  Here’s another one.

Summary

I'm back today with another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that people make. The title of the show is, "What was the question again?" It's really the notion of going off topic. And just basking in your own magnificence, talking until you're putting everyone to sleep by making them think about lunch or dinner or how the hell he get the heck out of his interview. It happens more often than you think.

I remember on one occasion I was interviewing someone for client. I'm a very easy interviewer; I just want to know what the truth is. It's really that simple. Tell me your story; help me understand; I would ask good questions. It wasn't complicated. In this person start to go on and on and on in such minute detail about nothing that relates to the question. There was a point where I said, "Hey! I have to ask you a question."

"Sure."

"Do you remember my original question?" He didn't. It let me know that he'd been on so many interviews that he stop listening to the question and just start to answer what he thought the question was, instead of listening to it.

You seek folks people are asking questions for a reason. They want to know something specific about how you match job, both from the standpoint of skills and experiences to getting a sense of personality. Do you make them feel confident in you that you can do the job. When you go off on these wild tangents that have nothing to do with anything that has been set up until that point, heck, they just go bonkers. I go bonkers! You're putting me to sleep and all I want to do is in the conversation.

Just be self-aware. Focus in on the question. Give your answer in 45 to 75 seconds. It's really that simple and you will make this mistake.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

It’s Hard to Avoid This Interview Mistake (VIDEO)

 

I point to one of the mistakes job hunters make when interviewing in person or doing a video interview.

Summary

I see a lot of mistakes that people make and this 1 is geared toward job hunters. It can occur in an in person interview and they can occur in a video interview. What you're doing when you make this mistake is tipping offices of nerves that you have that you want to disguise for better.

What I'm doing as I record this is sitting in a swivel chair and rocking from side to side. I'm actually feeling calm this morning, so this is quite a bit of an act for many people I talk with by Skype, some version of video interviewing whether it's FaceTime or some other way our talk to a person, I see them rocking in the chair a little bit. You not disguising you nerves. It's really that simple.

If you are doing a video interview, you want to have a basic chair. No swivel to it. If the role, if you are nervous. I don't want to be revealed this way. I would rather have you use you nerves with your hands so that you use your hands to emphasize things as you speak.

If you are sitting with me, my hands to be about waist high as I'm talking. But when were talking now, when speaking with your hands you want to use them to illustrate going point by point by point. You can illustrate that with your hands and I am flicking them as I would an interview.

You never want to cross your hands across her face. You may want to frame your face at times, or frame your body at times with your hands. Never EVER block your face because there was a signal and that about hiding... At least that the signal the people are trained to believe that the behavior indicate (I think it's a case of nervous energy, but this is again how people are trained).

At the end of the day, you always ALWAYS want to demonstrate being firm, certain, confident and rocking chair turns you back in the being a little boy your little girl back in public school sitting at a desk, maybe being brought up in front of the teacher... All that sort of nonsense. You don't need that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

How Do I Deal With a Fly In Interview In The Future | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 804 I respond to someone’s fly in interview gone terribly wrong.

Summary

I received a message today from someone who posed a scenario asked different opinion. He has done a phone interview and is told that it will is a technicality for the client wanting to meet him. The recruiter tells him he needs to pay the airfare and travel and that if he is offered the job and takes it, he will be paid back for the trip.

Let's read between the lines. You lay out the money. If you get the job, I will pay you back. If you don't get the job, you will get nothing.

When he asks about what happens if they don't select me, the recruiter says that this is for sure them to stop talking negatively. Like I said, the recruiter is going to pay him back if he gets the job and if he doesn't get the job, he is out of luck.

Everything sounds find any books a flight from one city to Atlanta and rents a car. The night before, he goes to a friend's wedding and he is on a 3 AM flight the next morning. Let's get practical. He knows the guy for long time. It's a big decision to go to the wedding , but he is only 3 AM flight so his at the airport at 1:30 AM. He is sleep deprived when he lands; he has an interview going on for in the long and the short of it is, he doesn't get the job. His body just wants to get to sleep and he didn't perform on the interview.

He tells the recruiter what happens. I want to explain it to the company. "I don't even care about the expenses." The company doesn't want to talk to him; the recruiter has no interest. The company doesn't want to talk to him. At the end of the day, he asks this question, "Is it a good deal to go on these fly outs prepaid? Does it come across stronger to say that I want half the money up front? Is it worth taking the risk of the client not paying up front?" He is looking for a way to protect themselves.

Here's my thinking.
1. If you have a wedding the night before, it isn't like the wedding wasn't on the schedule when the interview showed up, right? You knew about that before hand and you miscalculated. As a result, you will that going out sleep deprived. That has nothing to do with whether or not you are going to get paid back. That has to do with you making a mistake.
2. The way you handle this in the future is that you don't put yourself in the position where you are going to be sleep deprived and unable to perform. This is nothing to do with the money. This has to do with you.

You didn't deliver the goods on the interview and who would want to pay for you to have an excursion to stink up the joint. At the end of the day, what you could've done is say, "I can't do Monday. I can do Tuesday. I have plans on Sunday that I cannot change. Tuesday I can be there on an early morning flight." Do you know what you could have also done? You could go out Monday afternoon for a Tuesday interview, get a good nights sleep in a hotel and then walk in refreshed.

Instead, you made a mistake. People make mistakes and you ask for my advice... I give no BS advice. In the future, don't put it back to back like this on yourself. You've already demonstrated that you can't deliver under these circumstances; don't do it again.

You can try asking for money, but the agency will pay and most of the time, the company will pay. They've already told the recruiter what they're willing and unwilling to do. So, at the end of the day, it's on you to arrange the schedule in a way where you can perform.

It's a tough lesson and an expensive lesson because you obviously wanted this job enough to get on a plane and go there at your own expense. Now, don't duplicate that again.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Saying Different Things to Different People | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 797 Using the example of the old John Lovitz character, Tommy Flanagan, the pathological liar, I point out another stupid interview people make.

Summary

This is a video that I think I can make my point best using an old Jon Lovitz character, Tommy Flanagan (in character) "Yeah, that's what I did. Yeah, that's what I did." This is a character that John Lovitz stated on Saturday Night Live years ago who is a pathological liar. He was say a bunch of different things and when questioned about that would course correct. You knew he was lying . . . "Yeah, That's the ticket," became the tagline for the character. You just couldn't contain himself and couldn't keep himself in line.

Folks, there are a lot of people who go on job interviews, you talk to 1 hiring manager and then to another person and just say different things to different people. It isn't just that they do it from the 1st interview to the 2nd interview; after all, that is one way to get rejected easily. There is an inconsistency in a story you forgot the lie that you told. But some people do it from minute to minute on their 1st interview!

It's ridiculous! "Yeah, that's the ticket! Yeah that's the ticket!"

Don't be a jerk and, to be clear, I'm not telling you to get your lie down straight. The fact of the matter is that organizations have so many ways to catch the lie these days and the simplest thing is that they have an applicant tracking system, you probably applied to the more than once over the course of your career; they out of the old resume; they have a current resume.

Why would you lie to them? Your resume is sent to them, they go to LinkedIn to check you out, they get a different story about you. What's the message that you're telling them?

You claim to be strong in such and such and it is not in your LinkedIn profile. What are you telling them?

"Oh! I forgot to put it there!" Yeah. They are going to believe that.

The fact of the matter is if you make up different things and tell different things to different people and put a different face on your background, there are so many different ways that organizations can find out about who you are and what you have done.

You may have heard of this thing called. . . What's it called again? . . . GOOGLE.

It's easy for people to find out the truth.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Treating It As Though There Is a Two Way Street (VIDEO)


This is one of the dumbest mistakes people make when they interview– not treating the interview like a two-way street.

Summary

The mistake I want to call attention to is stupid. It is not treating the interview like it is a two-way street. I understand that for a lot of you when you are young, there is the tendency to think of your potential hiring manager, your potential boss, as though they are some demi-deity looking down their nose at you, making it seem like they are superior to you. That could be furthest from the truth.

What the trying to do is evaluate and assess you. Most of them are not feeling as though they are high and powerful and all that sort of nonsense. Think of it from the standpoint that you have rights of the interview, too. You want to know what their expectations of you are, what the job is good be like, what it's like working there and need to arrive with some questions. After you answer something that they ask you about, you might just simply ask, "How does that fit into the role?" In this way, you can learn more about the job as you answer their questions.

For example, they ask you something, you answer and continue by saying, "How is that involved with the job that you are hiring me for?" They will tell you about it and it makes perfect sense. If it doesn't, you have learned something about them and that is useful to you.

Everything needs to be about you learning information about them as much as they learning about you. You need to understand what you will be stepping into in the way of a role, its responsibilities and have successful be measured. I want to come back to that one – – how success will be measured.

It's funny how often I talk to people who think success in the job is about one thing when it is about something completely different. Don't sell yourself short. Don't put yourself in the position where they are the powerful ones and you feel like a loser. Where they are up high and powerful and you feel weak and passive.

No one likes week people during dating; we want to talk to people who relate to at that doesn't involve superior-subordinate situations. The same thing is true on an interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes

Stupid Interview Mistakes Criticizing The Past | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

I talk about another 1 of those dumb things that people do on interviews – – criticizing the past.

Summary

Here's one of those stupid interview mistakes that people make so often… It's frustrating… I want to shake them. The mistake is criticizing the past.

It can be the lengthy rant about a coworker who would eat your lunch., . It could be the rant that goes "I've been with this firm for 5 years, passed over for one promotion or another and I have had it!" "My boss is an imbecile!" You may say that a more mild-mannered fashion. But what you say still translates into that.

You become super-critical of one thing or another to the point where you just sound like you are a complainer. Some of the sitting opposite you during the interview and you know what's going through their mind? "OK. I would how long it's going to take for this to happen to me? I could have brought cancer into our midst. So I'm going to nod my head for a while, smile and bring this 1 to an end."

Here's what you need to do in order to be effective communicating why you want to change jobs. For example, in the case of feeling passed over, you don't want to focus on the past over part of the story. "I am real good at my work and my firm likes me in this role, but I don't want to spend the next 25 years of my life doing the same thing over and over again. I understand I may have to join this firm and prove myself here in order to demonstrate my abilities. I am looking for an organization where I can learn and grow and get ahead. And, unfortunately, my firm seems content in me doing the same job for the rest of my life. That really isn't for me. Again, I'm willing to demonstrate to you that I'm capable, competent and willing to pay my dues here, but I also want to know that there is an upside."

They know right away that you are looking for promotional opportunities in the future. That isn't a bad thing, right? That's one way to do it.

For the example of the coworker who eats my lunch or the problem coworker… I work with a problem coworker who steal stuff from his colleagues. I have worked with this organization for a long time. After a while, there are some personalities that show up, people don't necessarily behave properly. And, I don't want to come across like I'm a complainer or whiner. I'm not. Yet, when people go to the refrigerator and take my lunch out or, as was in my case, they steal resumes from coworkers and present them to other recruiting firms, there is a problem in the office! When management doesn't want to address it because this person is making sales, eventually, I have to ask myself, 'Who is looking out for me?' That is why I am sitting here." You can come up with your own version of this story.

My boss is an imbecile. Never go down that road. Never ever go down the road of criticizing her boss. It is a losing proposition. You are better off doing the speech about, "I want to join an organization where I can learn and grow and get ahead," rather than being critical of your boss.

Again, you don't want to be criticizing the past. You want to be looking forward and using the example of the problem colleague, "People are people. I'm sure in this organization, if someone were stealing from the firm. This is not something that would be tolerated. I trust that you would handle things in a professional way and look after the people."

This is a very graceful way to wrap that one up.

I hope you found this video helpful.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

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