Executive Networking Mistakes

Executive Networking Mistake #1 | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the biggest mistake executives and others make when networking.
Summary

Have you ever gotten 1 of those emails that says, "Hey! How are you? How's it going?" The next line basically translates into I'm looking for a new job. Can you help me?

You just want to hit the delete key because you haven't heard from this person for the longest time and suddenly, they are sending a message to you, like they are your long lost cousin and they need $20,000 from you.

You hate those emails yet so many of you operate that way of doing networking. You see, the biggest skill that you can develop professionally (other than the core job skills that you have) is maintaining your network. That's because at the end of the day, there is going to come a point where you going to need them. You may want to hire someone that they know or you may need help finding another position. Not nurturing your network is a huge mistake that way too many of you people make.

I don't care if you are in the C suite, the have a corporation, or the most senior person that firm. You as an individual have to cultivate and nurture a network of contacts because, one day, you don't want to be in the position of lurching to someone and say, "Hey! How are you?? How's it going? It was going real well for me until…" And then having to ask for a favor.

How many favors like that you grant? Most people I know don't grant many of them… If any of them.

Nurture your network during the time that you don't need so that they are available during the times when you do need them.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
 
Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

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The Self Assessment Profile for The Executive Search Firm (VIDEO)


If you want to play in the big leagues, you will probably need to change your thinking about the self-assessment the executive search firm sends to you.

Summary

I want to talk with you folks today, particularly if you are a senior professional, and are working with an executive search firm. To be clear, I'm not talking about a contingency firm that is saying to you, "we do executive search, too." I'm talking about the real deal firms. You're up for an SVP role or a C suite position of some kind and you're dealing with "the big boys," and "the big girls." Often, they will send the document to you that requires a self-assessment. How do you respond to this?

I had a conversation with someone I coach received a three-page document that he was asked to complete before he met the partner who is responsible for the search. His 1st reaction was to blow through it pretty quickly. I said, "Stop! Your job here is to make the case for your candidacy. They have developed a specification for the client. They sat down with them and met them. You spoken with the head of corporate HR prior to speaking with them. You have an advantage over some of the others. But, at the end of the day, they use this is a legitimate screening tool AND it can be used as the basis for their presentation of you to their client for how you fit. Why would you blow through this?"

I decided and persuaded him to take this three-page document and turn it into 7 - 8 pages in length. It's more than 100% increase in length, not being on the questions that seem pretty straightforward (questions like, "what's your compensation?" How long is that going to take? 3 lines? 4 lines?") but on questions that go to the heart of your ability to demonstrate how you fit the role and demonstrate your communications style.

If you want to blow through that, you are not ready for the big leagues. If you want to look this is the eyes of how the search firm is going to view you, not just simply by what you say but by what you don't say, but what you communicate, by what your style of communications is, then you are ready to play at this level.

Don't give short shrift to this because in the past you were less experience than thought this was a trivial exercise and thought someone should call you and talk to you. To play in the big leagues you have to deal with how the big boys and big girls want to be dealt with. They want your best take on how your background fits in. You're going to take the time to reflect and answer the questions in detail to give them great material to make the case for why you fit this role.

DON'T BLOW IT because there is nothing worse from your vantage point, then to not take something like this seriously and then wind up losing an opportunity because you were dismissive of it. That's a mistake. Don't make it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

5 Things C Level Professionals Should Always Do When Engaged in a Search

When I would lead weekends for The ManKind Project, an international men’s organization that supports men live their lives with accountability, generosity and with missions of service, we often spoke of how men with different levels of experience staffing had a completely different perspective of the same weekend.

The less experienced staff might just be thrilled to be there and focused purely on their individual assignments. Those who had staffed several times could like at things beyond the individual task to be done and look to fill in where they saw gaps. Their view of the workshop was at a higher level. We discuss the staff hierarchy and then get to the weekend leader who could see things like an eagle from 100,000 feet and be able to zero in on pivotal moments in the weekend and swoop in and advance it. As leaders, we would mentor/coach key people at critical moments and, only if necessary, step in with the certainty of our authority and responsibility and handle a key moment.

As a C-level professional or other senior professional interviewing with a firm, consider that you are moving to a new land where you may or may not know anyone or understand what your assets are stepping into a situation?

Here are a few ways to explore the new land and come to a decision about whether this is an organization that makes sense for you.

  1. Ask yourself, “What’s most important to you in the next job or organization? What will I need to see or hear to believe it is a great choice for me?” Everything starts with understanding what your needs and desires are. I am not suggesting that you be so rigid as to create a statue or shrine to these desires that you worship at. You do need to understand your target and what you are willing to be flexible about BEFORE you begin your search. This becomes a key document when you evaluate your decisions later on so do not skip over this and think that you know what it is. Until you put it down in writing, you risk tricking yourself into doing things that you really shouldn’t.
  2. What is the firm’s mission? I wrote an article called, “The 1 Question Every C-Level Candidate Should Be Asked (And a Lot of Non-C Suite Potential Hires, Too)” that encouraged employers to ask C Level professionals to ask whether a potential hire understood the firm’s mission. Why is it here (other than to make a lot of money)? Does it have a calling that you can get behind? Is it purely transactional (we sell stuff and try to make customers happy). There is nothing wrong with that if you can get excited by that You need to understand your personal calling and what you hope to get from your next job or organization.
  3. What are their cultural values and how do they mesh with yours? Often, senior professionals lose their way and become purely focused on short term goals that their boss has set for them and lose track of how in the new job everything they do should provide meaning and value to the firm and to themselves. No one will say, “We love renegades and mercenaries. Are you that way?” No, they will talk about integrity and cultural fit. Don’t take this at face value. Ask, “With so many smart capable people, what challenges would you expect we will face in working together to achieve our institutional “Why?”
  4. Use the STAR method of storytelling in reverse . . . with a twist. You have probably learned to tell stories following the STAR method. Describe the situation you stepped into, the tasks you and your team engaged in including any challenges or constraints, the actions you took and the results you achieved. Ask them about the situation you will be stepping into, the tasks you will be asked to perform coupled with challenges and constraints to achieving them, the actions they will want you to take as well as the results expected (and in what time). The twist is to get a clear understanding of the assets and resources available to you. I remember someone I represented as a headhunter who talked about joining a firm and was not understanding what he was stepping into. 80% of the money had been spent but only 20% of the work had been done to date. Ooops! Doomed to fail.
  5. You have a network. Use it. Don’t simply use your network for warm introduction it to validate what you are being told and minimize surprises. Surprises are rarely good. Remember to use your network to validate and confirm.

For you in the C Suite or in senior roles, you have an opportunity to lead, to survey the landscape from 100,000 feet and provide your unique perspective while accomplishing something significant to an organization while satisfying yourself.

Take time and follow the model to get there.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017    

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Are you interested in 1:1 executive job search coaching or business life coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job non-executive jobhunters—videos, my books and guides to job search, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Get Off Your Butt. Do Something! | Job Search Radio

EP 273 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages executives to get offline but and get out of the house.

Summary

I want to talk to you as an executive who's trying to find work and what you need to do while you are looking for work.

You run a line of business you have been an important player in your organization. Now, you are channel surfing. You are watching Netflix. You are waiting for the phone to ring. You know you're supposed to be out there networking. But, the fact of the matter is, a degree of lethargy has said it because you're just not as busy as you once were.

Get busy.

What I find is, like the old saying from "The Shawshank Redemption," "Get busy living or get busy dying." You gotta get out there and make things happen.

Yes, that involves networking, but you're not in a network 8, 9, 10 hours a day. You know that already. Yes, you can go to the gym but how long are you going to work out? Do they get on the treadmill. You're going to walk or jog for a period of time. You're going to lift some weights. You will be out in an hour. Maybe you do a sweat and/or steam afterwards, then maybe it is 2 hours.

What are you going to do the rest of the time? Answer. Find the contract for yourself. Volunteer for an organization. Do something that floats your boat.

Find something that gives you some excitement and some joy. Here's why say that.

If you let the lethargy take hold, what ultimately happens is that is that you interview in a lethargic way. If you've got some joy going on in your life, if you're having some fun on a contract, if you're having some fun doing some volunteer work, lo and behold you perform that much better.

It is so important for you to stay active, rather than sitting around on a meditation cushion for 4 hours a day developing your practice. Don't get me wrong. I like meditating, too, and I do it regularly. But you know what I'm talking about. You have to be ready to perform for an interview.

You don't have to be high-octane workaholic Joe or Jane. What you need to be is "on." Doing something while you're looking for work will go a long way toward helping you

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes
. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The 1 Question Every C-Level Candidate Should Be Asked (And a Lot of Non-C Suite Potential Hires, Too)

Meaning.

Few of us like to think of ourselves as cogs in a machine. No where is that more true than in the C suite where a man or woman is hired to embody an idea or concept and lead an organization.

Yet so much of their interview, so much of how a man or woman is measured translates into two things:

Do you have what I believe are the requisite skills and experience that will need to execute in this role.

Do I trust you.

Of the two, usually by the time of the interview, what a firm is really doing is confirming your assertions that you have the requisite experience and looking you square in the eye to see if they believe you.

No wonder interviewing has become such an unsatisfactory way of evaluating potential hires. In most cases, it has turned into “business blind dating” . . . and we know how unsatisfying most blind dates have turned out.

What if I told you that there was one question you could ask that would allow you to identify the special people, the ones that should grade out head and shoulders above the others, would you be interested in using that question in your interview, whether you were a potential employer or C suite hire?

Here’s the question:

Are you familiar with our firm’s mission and what does it mean to you?

There’s only one problem with asking this question of Potential C-Suite Hires

There’s only one problem . . . Most corporate mission statements are as dry as sand and equally inspiring.

Here are a few examples that may yield defensive responses:

Serving Others. For Customers, A Better Life. For Shareholders, A Superior Return. For Employees, Respect and Opportunity” (Yawn)

To provide our policyholders with as near perfect protection, as near perfect service as is humanly possible and to do so at the lowest possible cost.” (I guess it wasn’t good enough to provide policyholders with the right protection; they had to give themselves some wiggle room)

Helping our customers manage document workflow and increase efficiency through best-in-class products and services. Fostering the growth and development of our employees. Providing a distinct advantage to our suppliers as a distribution channel of choice. Growing shareholder value through strong execution of our strategies.” (Are you excited?)

It is the policy of xxxxx to provide products and services to the market which meet or exceed the reasonable expectations of our customers. Satisfying our customers with the appropriate level of quality is a primary goal and a fundamental element of our business mission.”  (Not a mission statement. It is a policy statement, hence a goal).

Let me contrast these with:

(Our) mission is to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected. People use (us) to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them.”

or

to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

or

“We enable businesses to thrive and economies to prosper, helping people fulfill their hopes and dreams and realize their ambitions.”

When did business stop believing in becoming bold and breathtakingly great? In our search for meaning, do you think we will be more inspired by offering a leader the opportunity to help a firm become “near perfect” or “helping businesses thrive, economies prosper and people fulfill hopes and dreams?” Do mission statements that could be used in a greeting card help attract exceptional leaders or cause them to be repelled?

And, if you tell me that the mission statement means nothing and the last time it was referred to by management was during the last century, what are you telling the public about your words having meaning?

Mission statements should be a rallying point for everyone to be extraordinary so that your firm can be extraordinary. If they ave no meaning to you, take it off your website and abandon the lie. However if they do have meaning, ask potential hires if they are familiar with your firm’s mission (first tip off of adequate preparation) and what that mission means to them.

And if you are looking at a firm as a potential employer, ask the people you meet with about the firm’s mission and what it means to them. You will learn something about the leadership of the organization and its congruence with its avowed values.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

 

If you liked this article, read, “4 Things to Do to Find Your Next C Level Job (And None of Them Involve Writing a Resume).

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life 

coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, executive coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

LinkedIn Groups for Executive Job Hunters (VIDEO)


Job hunting for executives is a but different than for the non-executive population. Here is a simple strategy for LinkedIn groups that will serve you well.

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about LinkedIn groups for executive job hunters because I think they can be a great part of what can be a strategy of putting yourself in the position to be found and located, instead of needing to be, "aggressive." After all, it's not like using executive can go out in mass mailing resume to the Western Hemisphere like junior people can (but shouldn't). That is the easiest way to embarrass yourself.

With LinkedIn groups what you have the ability to do is join groups in areas of your expertise, areas of your business knowledge, Jerry is where people might be looking for someone like you. For example, joining a group that deals with private equity or joining a group that deals with a line of business that you are in. From there, look for key people in that group to drop a note to, not instantly (you don't want to do it in the same day that you join). Wait a week or 2. Participate.

Drop them a note that says, "Were both part of this group. I thought I would drop you a note and see if there was a place where I can help you and, perhaps, start a professional relationship with you. They'll accept and from there you can start formulating your contacts with them or your relationship with them over the course of time.

LinkedIn groups is very powerful in this way and is extremely underutilized by executives. Private equity groups in particular are a homerun for executive job hunters because from your vantage point, because you want to be perceived as being out aggressively looking. You want to be in a position where someone is looking for someone like you.

For example, I've always encourage people to go out on the speaker circuit and do keynotes. Put yourself in the situation where you are seen as the expert in what you do and you are presenting as the expert. A fun thing that you can do you share a photo of yourself at Ted Talk with 1 of the speakers. Lo and behold it's like their halo transfers over to you (By the way, be careful with politicians. These days, we never know how someone will respond to them).

Use groups to reach out to individuals on LinkedIn and put yourself in the position of being noticed so that you could share information, folks can find you easily and you can start developing relationship with decision-makers and influencers within your field. It will really help you catch up.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

4 Things to Do to Find Your Next C Level Job (And None of Them Involve Writing a Resume)

I have spoken to thousands of C level professionals over the course of 40+ years in executive search. Almost to a fault, they are all serious minded professionals who have worked hard to where they are today. Many have sacrificed days, nights and weekends to obtain education or serve employer needs and now are in a position where they have to look for work. Maybe they were “rightsized” (That is a wonderful lie organizations tell people. You weren’t fired. You were “rightsized) after a merger or business reversal. Maybe they feel stuck doing the same work they have done for the past 5,10, 15 or more years and have started to ask themselves, “Is this all there is?”  No matter, it is now time to face the fact that the organization you’ve given blood, sweat and tears to won’t be your future home.

I know that staff professionals can have similar epiphanies but it tends to be different for those of you in the C suite. If you aren’t yet there, you are rapidly approaching “the back 9” of your career. You maybe questioning whether ageism is going to make it harder for you to find work (it will) and how you will stack up to your competitors (you’re better than some and worse than some).

All your performance appraisals for your entire career now feel like little more than pablum as you plan on stepping out onto the battle field of an executive job search. Writing a resume. Networking. Interviewing. That’s what is ahead of you. Doesn’t seem like fun. After all, many of you will be working full time and adding to your “To Do” list of priorities. It is enough for many of you to give up, suck it up and slink back into your office, next flight or start blaming the economy and ageism.

Here are 4 things you can do to find your next C level job

1. Learn the lesson that Marshall Goldsmith teaches.

His book entitled, “What Got You Here Won’t Get You There” calls attention to a simple act of wisdom. People know they need to change but what what they really want is to do the same thing they’ve always done but get a different result. You are going to have to do things differently in your search and in your career, as well. Answering ads won’t work. 70% of positions are filled as a result of networking; 70% of the 70% are filled as a result of introductions to people who your network knows who you don’t (My interview with Dave Opton of Execunet on Job Search Radio. Listen to the interview). In addition, you are going to have to make changes. You achieved a level of professional success. To play BIG, you will probably need to make a few changes.

2. Stop working so damned hard on your job.

All work and no play has made you dull and boring. You sound like every other person and say the same things everyone else did. The system has chewed you up and is about to spit you out leaving you homogenized and pasteurized. As things stand now, you are not the interesting and certainly not that different than anyone else the search firm and their clients are interviewing. Running on the treadmill of your career has turned you into a machine and not a better human. Take a half step back and take some time with your husband, wife or partner. Go skiing or on a sail. Have a lovely dinner with them regularly. Spend some time with the kids. Ask them what could you do to be a better (husband/wife/partner . . . or Dad/Mom). You do it with customers and they don’t mean as much to you as your family. Ask your family and then try to do better.

3. Think Media, Not Social Media.

In days of old, executive search firms would ignore resumes that were submitted to them and look for newspaper clippings using microfiche4 Things to Do to Find Your Next C Level Job (And None of Them Involve Writing a Resume) (antique celluloid data bases of newspaper articles) resumes that are submitted, have access to their own data bases PLUS for stories about successful executives. Today, they still ignore that are submitted to them, buy access to LinkedIn Recruiter and search media for relevant talent. One thing hasn’t changed–finding people who are not “actively looking for work” and locating people via media outlets. These people are seen as subject matter experts. Play BIG. When they Google you, where will they find you. Annual report? Interview you did with CNBC, CNN or Fox? No where? Average people can’t be found. Being found is no guaranty. It is just the first cut.

4. Get help.

You don’t know what you don’t know. You may have hired people but that doesn’t make you an expert at job hunting at this level. After all,4 Things to Do to Find Your Next C Level Job (And None of Them Involve Writing a Resume) you’ve heard of the 10000 rule that points to how 10000 hours of deliberate practice, stretching you outside of your comfort zone has the potential for mastery. How much experience do you have with this kind of job search? How few hours of experience do you have. In addition to the captain of the plane (you), captains have various members to their team including crew, mechanics, ground control and airline staff supporting them. Who’s your team. Get a coach who works extensively in this space to help you. The search firms are there to fill positions and not help you find work unless it is with their client. Hire your team. Let your coach put you in touch with resume writers they like. Don’t let the resume writer captain the search. I am confident in many of their abilities to write an effective resume but their experience with the actual search may be quite limited. Hire a job search coach with experience working with an executive clientele.

I have skipped over some of the obvious things everyone knows they need to do whether they are C suite or not. Starting with 30 minutes a day working on your search if you are still working and at least 3 hours if you are unemployed leaves plenty of time for networking, preparing information for your resume writer and other search related activities like practicing for your interviews.

Don’t tough it out. Pretend you are delegating and outsource what you can to others and work on the things only you can do. 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching. He is also the host of “Job Search Radio,” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio” podcasts.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

For non-executives, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Will Be Our ROI If We Hire You? (VIDEO)


A question that is asked of senior professionals, here I ,explain how to answer it.

Summary

Someone wrote to me asking me to answer a question that's geared toward senior professionals. It's a stupid question; you and I both know that. I want to take it straight on so I can go into a little bit of depth with it.

The question is, "What will be our ROI. If we hire you?"

We both know it's stupid because it's impossible to really calculate. After all, you don't have the budget that you walking into, you don't have details of the challenges that you be facing, you don't know the quality of the people you'll be inheriting, how do you answer the question?

The answer is… You go through this with them.

"Great question and I think it is impossible to quantify now. Part of it is that I don't know who I am inheriting in this group. I don't know exactly what it is I'm walking into. I don't know if my user population is going to be challenging or supportive." You go through 5 or 6 things that as an outsider is impossible to quantify and to use that language specifically.

"I think it is impossible to quantify as an outsider."

Now, here is where the shift occurs.

This shift is now saying, "But I can tell you what I have done and other organizations. At my last firm, I walked into a number of different situations and was able to achieve (a 350%, a 450%… Whatever percentage it is) return on investment over my salary/over my budget." That sort of thing where you can specifically claim credit for it.

You can also say, "I want to be clear, no one operates as an island in these situations. I put together a great team and that is part of the measure of ROI-- getting people on board who buy into the mission here, who are inspired who have a desire to do great stuff."

What you doing is starting off by saying, "I can't quantify it with you. Here is why." Then, from there, you talk about how in the past. This is how it turned out, when people have hired you." Then, if you want, you can smile and say, "And in all candor, I have to say, I am here to be honest with you. Like the mutual fund industry says, 'Past performance is no guarantee of future returns,' there are so many variables here that I can't speak to is an outsider and give you such a measure."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

10 Questions You Should Ask Executive Candidates (VIDEO)


When you are interviewing executive candidates, here are 10 questions you should ask executive candidates.

Summary

I put together 10 questions that I thought should be asked of each executive that you or your firm interviews. I want to be clear that these questions don't deal with an objective evaluation of their knowledge. These fall into the category of "everything else." If you like to ask knowledge-based questions obviously can't be on the list because I cannot cover every topic. I can have questions that allow people to assess them for their leadership.

1. Describe a time you faced an unforeseen issue and how you diffused and resolve the situation.

2. How have you helped your firm make or save money? How much?

3. In your last position. What was your strategy for building relationships with your team? With your peers? With the people that you served?

4. Tell me about a time where you and or your team faced challenging odds and had you keep them motivated, engaged and inspired to overcome the situation and succeed. I personally like inspired rather than motivated. Inspiration is an internal force; motivation is external… But that's a conversation for another occasion.

5. Explain a time when you had to promote an idea or a project to a group and how did you go about persuading the others?

6. Describe a time when you had to deal with conflict in your department and how did you handle it?

7. (I love this 1 and the next one in particular) Why does your management style work? I think it's an interesting question because you're acknowledging that it does work , but why does it work? Is this just something that they pulled out of the seat-of-the-pants or has there been conscious decision-making about it? I trust that you as the leader of an organization can smell BS. That's the most important factor here.

8. Who are your enemies and how did you make them? This is a new favorite question of mine for leadership interviews. I learned it from someone I'm coaching who is a COO candidate and someone asked of him. I love this question because leaders usually make enemies along the way; you want them to be self-aware enough to notice them. You don't want them to say, " I have no enemies. Everybody loves me. I'm like a good puppy.. Everybody loves me."Everybody makes enemies.Someone has to be prepared to divulge that so you know that there are honest.

9. What professional accomplishments are you most proud of and why? This is a softball question. If they can't answer that one with a big smile on their face, there's something wrong here.

10. (Notice I built up through some challenging questions and then throw in a softball. Now this 1) What is the hardest criticism you've heard over the course of your management career ( or your leadership/Executive career)? This is an opportunity for the person to be self-aware in front of you; they have a chance to talk about their successes and mistakes..You want to hear about the mistakes and flush them outBut you also want to get a sense of the character of the individual here in order to find out whether they can be trusted with the keys to your organizational "car."

Most people this level have a great propensity for preparation and the ability to present things in cogent ways. Questions 7, 8 and 10 are designed to be personally revealing. You'll learn a lot from their answers but they are set up by the others.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Final Interview Mistakes That Will Send Your Candidacy Down The Drain (VIDEO)


3 mistakes people make at final interviews that will send their candidacy down the drain.

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about mistakes people make and final interviews The proof so costly and send their candidacy down the tubes.

1. You don't prepare. Preparation doesn't have to be A big dramatic thing. You can start off by looking at the LinkedIn profile the person you will be meeting with So you will have a degree of comfort Derived from knowing what their background is. Do a Google search to find any recent stories about them which, specifically, if you're an executive candidate, You want to know about these changes so that you can raise comments in conversation during the interview. If you are a staff level individual, you want to be familiar with some of them so that you can have a conversation with your future boss about them.

2. You start to feel bold. You start to feel cocky. As a result, you start to make new demands at the interview. That makes them scratch their heads and ask themselves, "What's with this person?" If you change your thinking about the role, you don't do it in the interview.You don't get arrogant. What you do is you stick with the program so that in this way there are no surprises.1 of the big lessons in recruiting is that surprises are rarely good. After all, If you're an employer and you start to hear a potential hire start to go crazy over money and talk about getting much more time off than raised previously, it just makes you scratch your head and go, "Where did this come from?" In much the same way for you as a job hunter you have been discussing one price and they come in $30,000 less, you go, "HUH?" They are no different.

If you start making crazy demands that come in and out of the blue, they will become turned off your candidacy.

3. This 1 can happen at any point in the interview, but final interviews are particularly treacherous about this Because in many organizations leadership is very good at it facilitating you taking your guard down. The mistake here is becoming too casual and to open in your conversations.

I remember an incident some years ago where client flew someone in for an in person interview because of the rare skill and experience this person possessed. They were prepared to relocate this person for the role. He met with his future boss and she asked him a question. His response was, "I will go into the detail once I am on board." In her mind, it was a brutal response even though what happened is they were so friendly with one another that he got to a point where he forgot that she was assessing him. As a result, he was turned down for this role and they hired someone else.

For you as a job hunter,, as much as they may be friendly and open and all sorts of happy along the way, they are still evaluating and assessing you. They are doing it in every moment of the conversation AND even in the pre-conversation. During the scheduling. At the receptionist desk, how you interact with the receptionist. In organizations that have them, 1 of the things I have heard time and time again is how candidates were obnoxious with the receptionist and he or she comes back And comments, "Where did that come from?" And people pay attention. This is an individual that they know, like and trust and, although they may not be performing the role, they taken as a signal.

Again, there are no "formalities" In ian interview. Everything offers them an opportunity for their BS detector to go up and cause you to be rejected.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Start Your 7 Day Free Trial Today

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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