The Difference Between How You Deal With Recruiters and What C Level Pros Do


There is a very clear difference between how C level professionals deal with recruiters and how non-C suite professionals and non-professionals do. What are you doing wrong?

Summary

I was coaching someone this morning and it reminded me of something where I want to talk with you who are not executives, who are not in the C suite, in terms of how you deal with recruiters.

What I coach C level professionals, one thing is incredibly obvious. They treat every interview with the recruiter as though are an interview with the client. They prepare for it. They want to understand the job. They start researching their own background and how it meshes with where they have connections that can play into the organization that the search firm is doing the search for. They treated very seriously.

For most people, they don't work at that way. They view it as a nuisance and an inconvenience. Often, the the messages given, "They are wasting my time," or "They are getting in the way." They send all sorts of messages that in for nuisance an inconvenience. Sometimes, the contingency recruiters not seen as being as professional as the executive search firm. Sometimes, that is absolutely true. AND half and you don't know that going into the conversation; all you know is that you got a phone call or an email or an inMail talking about a particular search, maybe they are asking for help, and suddenly this is PAIN. Suddenly, you are whining and complaining vs. a C suite person who will offer a referral , make a suggestion to the search firm and prepare for the interview.

They get results and you get aggravation. They become successful the search was far more often than you do. What's the message in that?

Again, sometimes contingency recruiters are not competent. Sometimes, executive recruiters an optically competent either. You are times that executive search firms that in the contingency area AND it makes no difference.

One thing I want to leap in with is that sometimes those contingency firms are approached with racism.

"Some Indian firm called."

"Some Indian guy called."

Excuse me? I want to stop eating the tracks on that one. The fact that they have a particular national origin or from a particular nation and hired by a US firm to do recruiting for them? STOP IT. STOP IT!

Take a bias outside because you wind up being no different than any other bigot and cutting yourself off at the knees, even if they are a very junior individual and from a nation other than yours, no matter where in the world they are, does not make them incompetent, rude, or worse.

Slow down and work on creating a great impression. It is what executives and people in the C suite do.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/15/salary-negotiation-advice-for-executives-3/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Summary

I just want this speak with you and say that if you're working with a recruiter, I know this may be hard, but you just have to trust them to do the job. That job and I'm speaking of is to do the negotiation for you.

You get to the point where you have the offer or on the run up to the offer. There are 2 different approaches – – one from the contingency side, the other from the retained search side.

I think the retained search side finds it less difficult to do the negotiation. On the contingency side, there is a certain panic involved because there is that much more money that is involved in the way of a commission. Often, with a contingency recruiter, the relationship may not be as strong as it is with the retained recruiter. Again, knowing the relationship that your representation has with the client is going to be a big help to you.

Let's assume it is a contingency recruiter and you are on the run up phase and they ask, "So, how much are you looking for, again? I want to make sure I have the numbers right." By now, you should have an idea of how much you be looking for based upon what you know about the job, what you know in the way of comparables for people like you... I'm not talking about those broad salary ranges (just to pick arbitrary numbers) like $200,000-$275,000. Everywhere there's a $275,000, knowing here's the $200,000 and so they know your here's all the numbers in the middle. Recognize that that is a pretty broad range. You want to get more targeted.

When the recruiter starts to talk you down as often, they will try to do, that may be a signal that they already know what the hiring firm is going to propose. You can cut right through. "Have you spoken with the firm? What's the number they are talking about? Let's just go right to it." This way, you can start working for the case as to why they have to up the number and why they have to represent you to up the number.

When push comes to shove, you may already know that they offer $245,000, you will take it. They don't need to know that. You have to push for the biggest number because at this point, what they are trying to do is squeeze you into that pocket that your client has been trying to wedge you into and that may not necessarily serve your needs.

Again, given the idea that you're going to do this and is going to generate this amount of money. Save this amount of money. At the end of the day, the client may not necessarily shift AND you may go directly to the client. Initially, following the old Nixon proverb, trust but verify. You have to do a certain amount of trust because they represent you up until this point, you want them to represent you, across the finish line.

If you get to a point where the client hasn't budged asked them to schedule one more conversation for you. They will ask, "What's the intention?".

"I would just like to talk with them before I make my decision. It's a tough choice for me; it's important choice for me. I want to make sure I have all the information I need to make my decision."

Notice how noncommittal that is? You don't want to necessarily give the idea to the contingency recruiter that you will take the offer if the client doesn't budge. You want to get them to move a little bit And get them a little bit more flexible.

On the retained side, like I said, you can lay out the case more directly because they tend to be more forthright because they have less money at stake. Again, because of how you present it, you're always driving to the highest number. You don't have to be "nice." At this point, in the run up phase, they may have an idea of the number that is being proposed; they may not. Normally they will. Just go right to it.

"What's the number that they are talking about?"

You can respond by saying, "That's not going to be enough for me. I'm going to need them to make that 2nd number a such and such," and work from there. Start working through them and then again, go directly to the firm for one conversation. The ideal is if you walk in, but often that is not appropriate.
Skype, FaceTime, a phone call... However, works for you and them, set up one less conversation and then go for the close.

However, in situations where there is a retained search firm involved, be prepared to say yes or no on the spot. You don't want to let it dangle one because often offers are rescinded.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Being a Real Leader on Job Interviews | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/09/10/being-a-real-leader-on-job-interviews-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 861 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out the false “Hollywood Leadership Model,” defines what leadership really is and encourages you to show it on your interviews.

Summary

Today I want to talk with you about expressing your leadership on interviews.  Some people have the silly idea that people are born leaders, they are completely charismatic. It's like they walk into a room and the seas part and the heavens open up… And it's wrong.

In point of fact, most leaders are individuals who are passionate about what they do, can make a case for themselves and cause people to suddenly say, "I want to follow them."  Let me give you an example.

Whether you like his politics were not Pres. Obama is someone (communicated case out of his life) who, as teenager,  got high regularly, didn't show up for classes and is now president of the free world.  Is it they just hypnotized people along the way?  I don't think so.  Along the way, he exhibited qualities that cause people to trust him, unlike him and respect him.  There have certainly been a lot of people who have said, "No," to him along the way.  Yet, there was a and perseverance and determination about him that brought him to where he is today.

Again, let's not get into the politics.  I'm talking about the personal qualities the man has.

So, when you are interviewing, what is a firm looking for?  I talked about competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry, charisma, personal leadership.  This is the part of the conversation I'm having with you weren't talking with you about complete belief, your complete self-confidence. And, understand, people will say no to you.  It's not as though, again, the heavens will part and the seas will open up.  You need to display qualities that cause people to trust you, to have belief in you and have belief that you are the solution to a problem.  How do you do that?

I was listening to a podcast recently where Seth Godin was talking about You have no answers.  Most people walk into interviews and they are arrogant and they can tell an employer what they are doing wrong.  You 1st have to listen.  One may ask you, "How do you think you can help us," answer, "I don't know.  What problems do you have?  What issues do you have?  What have you tried so far?  I don't want to presume I know anything about your environment and make suggestions to you that are pointless.  You know, far more about this than I do.  Tell me what you have done so far.  Tell me what I can help you with."  Big difference in attitude!  My encouragement to you is to be someone who inspires confidence. Be the leader that you can be.

I was listening to a podcast recently where Seth Godin was talking about the ASPCA which most people don't know was originally an organization that puts animals to sleep.  Through the efforts of one person whose name I don't recall right now, they 1st set up a trial in San Francisco of no kill.  This man, who fought hard for this was supposed every step along the way.  He was nondescript. He was the antithesis of what in our Hollywood style culture is seen as a leader.  But he had faith, determination and persistence in him, that even though opponents flew in in the early 20th century to oppose his opinions, he still worked at it and persisted and eventually found the group of individuals to support them.  Eventually made that trial environment in San Francisco work.

He then took it elsewhere.. All the while he was the individual who was nondescript and, again, not exactly the image of a leader.  However, he became a leader.  He became someone who inspired belief in his ideas.  You can do that to you and you need to show that on your interviews.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/06/30/salary-negotiation-advice-for-executives/

EP 338 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Summary

I just want this speak with you and say that if you're working with a recruiter, I know this may be hard, but you just have to trust them to do the job. That job and I'm speaking of is to do the negotiation for you.

You get to the point where you have the offer or on the run up to the offer. There are 2 different approaches – – one from the contingency side, the other from the retained search side.

I think the retained search side finds it less difficult to do the negotiation. On the contingency side, there is a certain panic involved because there is that much more money that is involved in the way of a commission. Often, with a contingency recruiter, the relationship may not be as strong as it is with the retained recruiter. Again, knowing the relationship that your representation has with the client is going to be a big help to you.

Let's assume it is a contingency recruiter and you are on the run up phase and they ask, "So, how much are you looking for, again? I want to make sure I have the numbers right." By now, you should have an idea of how much you be looking for based upon what you know about the job, what you know in the way of comparables for people like you... I'm not talking about those broad salary ranges (just to pick arbitrary numbers) like $200,000-$275,000. Everywhere there's a $275,000, knowing here's the $200,000 and so they know your here's all the numbers in the middle. Recognize that that is a pretty broad range. You want to get more targeted.

When the recruiter starts to talk you down as often, they will try to do, that may be a signal that they already know what the hiring firm is going to propose. You can cut right through. "Have you spoken with the firm? What's the number they are talking about? Let's just go right to it." This way, you can start working for the case as to why they have to up the number and why they have to represent you to up the number.

When push comes to shove, you may already know that they offer $245,000, you will take it. They don't need to know that. You have to push for the biggest number because at this point, what they are trying to do is squeeze you into that pocket that your client has been trying to wedge you into and that may not necessarily serve your needs.

Again, given the idea that you're going to do this and is going to generate this amount of money. Save this amount of money. At the end of the day, the client may not necessarily shift AND you may go directly to the client. Initially, following the old Nixon proverb, trust but verify. You have to do a certain amount of trust because they represent you up until this point, you want them to represent you, across the finish line.

If you get to a point where the client hasn't budged asked them to schedule one more conversation for you. They will ask, "What's the intention?".

"I would just like to talk with them before I make my decision. It's a tough choice for me; it's important choice for me. I want to make sure I have all the information I need to make my decision."

Notice how noncommittal that is? You don't want to necessarily give the idea to the contingency recruiter that you will take the offer if the client doesn't budge. You want to get them to move a little bit And get them a little bit more flexible.

On the retained side, like I said, you can lay out the case more directly because they tend to be more forthright because they have less money at stake. Again, because of how you present it, you're always driving to the highest number. You don't have to be "nice." At this point, in the run up phase, they may have an idea of the number that is being proposed; they may not. Normally they will. Just go right to it.

"What's the number that they are talking about?"

You can respond by saying, "That's not going to be enough for me. I'm going to need them to make that 2nd number a such and such," and work from there. Start working through them and then again, go directly to the firm for one conversation. The ideal is if you walk in, but often that is not appropriate.
Skype, FaceTime, a phone call... However, works for you and them, set up one less conversation and then go for the close.

However, in situations where there is a retained search firm involved, be prepared to say yes or no on the spot. You don't want to let it dangle one because often offers are rescinded.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

Do executive search firms looking unsolicited resumes?

Do Executive Search Firms Look at ‘Unsolicited’ Resumes (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Unsolicited resumes. Do they look or ignore?

Summary

The question for today is, "Do executive search firms look at unsolicited resumes?" The way the question was originally phrased was, "Are executive search firms even looking at unsolicited resumes they get sent to them?"

You have to understand how the search business has evolved. It's history involves never looking at unsolicited resume. However, there might be someone in the office who parses unsolicited resumes; they have software that's going to input resumes that appeal to them into their system. There is this thing that you may have heard of called LinkedIn . . That part of the business is very data oriented. They are not looking for job hunters; they are looking for the best talent to fit the client's requirements.

A client hires them to do a task-- fill a particular job. The task has specific criteria. They may, but probably won't, input your resume to their system. You will need to have extraordinary skills to fit the search criteria that they tend to work on for clients; most firms have an orientation that focusing on certain lines of business or perhaps certain functions.

The question I have to ask back is, "Why should they?" Because you think your resume might be useful to them? How do you know? Oh! You want to get on the radar. Good. Do something great that fits their search criteria. Get written up. Get featured in an interview. Do things that turn your work into celebrity so that you are not just some person sitting at desk doing a job that you think is so valuable to other people. Get known!

This is the branding process that most people don't get. Search firms are acutely aware of how important the brand processes; it makes someone more salable to their client. It is not like they're trying to fill some staff level position. They are trying to fill positions for successful executives.

What makes someone appear to be successful? Answer. A vivid credential. I refer to it as a vivid credential because it is known, respected, been recognized, been written or interviewed about, has been on the stage talking about . These are criteria that allow them to recognize that other people have vetted you and identified you as being successful, smart and a leader.

Sending a resume to them? Useless! Let me restate that – – it's almost useless. You may get lucky. But the likelihood of you being lucky is so small that it is far better for you to put all that effort into developing a reputation so that you become visible and written about. You want to be published, you are on stage talking about your accomplishments, instead of simply being some guy who says a resume in.

Why do you want to be "some guy" or "some woman" who sins a resume in has some researcher look at it and ask themselves, "What we have this anyway? And then feel good about deleting it. Seriously. "Why do we have this resume?" If it's nothing that we are looking for.

Again, the nature of search has evolved so that data is more readily available. It's not like in the old days when I started often recruiting where you had to deal with microfiche and look at newspapers on microfilm and find the article that was written about you. There are so many places where you can get known! Focusing on that and not on, "whether they are even looking at your resume."

Who are you that you that they should even be looking at your resume?. That is what you should be focusing in on.-Who you are. That should make them want to focusing on you. -

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives | Job Search Radio

EP 338 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Summary

I just want this speak with you and say that if you're working with a recruiter, I know this may be hard, but you just have to trust them to do the job. That job and I'm speaking of is to do the negotiation for you.

You get to the point where you have the offer or on the run up to the offer. There are 2 different approaches – – one from the contingency side, the other from the retained search side.

I think the retained search side finds it less difficult to do the negotiation. On the contingency side, there is a certain panic involved because there is that much more money that is involved in the way of a commission. Often, with a contingency recruiter, the relationship may not be as strong as it is with the retained recruiter. Again, knowing the relationship that your representation has with the client is going to be a big help to you.

Let's assume it is a contingency recruiter and you are on the run up phase and they ask, "So, how much are you looking for, again? I want to make sure I have the numbers right." By now, you should have an idea of how much you be looking for based upon what you know about the job, what you know in the way of comparables for people like you... I'm not talking about those broad salary ranges (just to pick arbitrary numbers) like $200,000-$275,000. Everywhere there's a $275,000, knowing here's the $200,000 and so they know your here's all the numbers in the middle. Recognize that that is a pretty broad range. You want to get more targeted.

When the recruiter starts to talk you down as often, they will try to do, that may be a signal that they already know what the hiring firm is going to propose. You can cut right through. "Have you spoken with the firm? What's the number they are talking about? Let's just go right to it." This way, you can start working for the case as to why they have to up the number and why they have to represent you to up the number.

When push comes to shove, you may already know that they offer $245,000, you will take it. They don't need to know that. You have to push for the biggest number because at this point, what they are trying to do is squeeze you into that pocket that your client has been trying to wedge you into and that may not necessarily serve your needs.

Again, given the idea that you're going to do this and is going to generate this amount of money. Save this amount of money. At the end of the day, the client may not necessarily shift AND you may go directly to the client. Initially, following the old Nixon proverb, trust but verify. You have to do a certain amount of trust because they represent you up until this point, you want them to represent you, across the finish line.

If you get to a point where the client hasn't budged asked them to schedule one more conversation for you. They will ask, "What's the intention?".

"I would just like to talk with them before I make my decision. It's a tough choice for me; it's important choice for me. I want to make sure I have all the information I need to make my decision."

Notice how noncommittal that is? You don't want to necessarily give the idea to the contingency recruiter that you will take the offer if the client doesn't budge. You want to get them to move a little bit And get them a little bit more flexible.

On the retained side, like I said, you can lay out the case more directly because they tend to be more forthright because they have less money at stake. Again, because of how you present it, you're always driving to the highest number. You don't have to be "nice." At this point, in the run up phase, they may have an idea of the number that is being proposed; they may not. Normally they will. Just go right to it.

"What's the number that they are talking about?"

You can respond by saying, "That's not going to be enough for me. I'm going to need them to make that 2nd number a such and such," and work from there. Start working through them and then again, go directly to the firm for one conversation. The ideal is if you walk in, but often that is not appropriate.
Skype, FaceTime, a phone call... However, works for you and them, set up one less conversation and then go for the close.

However, in situations where there is a retained search firm involved, be prepared to say yes or no on the spot. You don't want to let it dangle one because often offers are rescinded.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

Executive Networking Mistakes

Executive Networking Mistake #1 | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the biggest mistake executives and others make when networking.
Summary

Have you ever gotten 1 of those emails that says, "Hey! How are you? How's it going?" The next line basically translates into I'm looking for a new job. Can you help me?

You just want to hit the delete key because you haven't heard from this person for the longest time and suddenly, they are sending a message to you, like they are your long lost cousin and they need $20,000 from you.

You hate those emails yet so many of you operate that way of doing networking. You see, the biggest skill that you can develop professionally (other than the core job skills that you have) is maintaining your network. That's because at the end of the day, there is going to come a point where you going to need them. You may want to hire someone that they know or you may need help finding another position. Not nurturing your network is a huge mistake that way too many of you people make.

I don't care if you are in the C suite, the have a corporation, or the most senior person that firm. You as an individual have to cultivate and nurture a network of contacts because, one day, you don't want to be in the position of lurching to someone and say, "Hey! How are you?? How's it going? It was going real well for me until…" And then having to ask for a favor.

How many favors like that you grant? Most people I know don't grant many of them… If any of them.

Nurture your network during the time that you don't need so that they are available during the times when you do need them.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
 
Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The Self Assessment Profile for The Executive Search Firm (VIDEO)


If you want to play in the big leagues, you will probably need to change your thinking about the self-assessment the executive search firm sends to you.

Summary

I want to talk with you folks today, particularly if you are a senior professional, and are working with an executive search firm. To be clear, I'm not talking about a contingency firm that is saying to you, "we do executive search, too." I'm talking about the real deal firms. You're up for an SVP role or a C suite position of some kind and you're dealing with "the big boys," and "the big girls." Often, they will send the document to you that requires a self-assessment. How do you respond to this?

I had a conversation with someone I coach received a three-page document that he was asked to complete before he met the partner who is responsible for the search. His 1st reaction was to blow through it pretty quickly. I said, "Stop! Your job here is to make the case for your candidacy. They have developed a specification for the client. They sat down with them and met them. You spoken with the head of corporate HR prior to speaking with them. You have an advantage over some of the others. But, at the end of the day, they use this is a legitimate screening tool AND it can be used as the basis for their presentation of you to their client for how you fit. Why would you blow through this?"

I decided and persuaded him to take this three-page document and turn it into 7 - 8 pages in length. It's more than 100% increase in length, not being on the questions that seem pretty straightforward (questions like, "what's your compensation?" How long is that going to take? 3 lines? 4 lines?") but on questions that go to the heart of your ability to demonstrate how you fit the role and demonstrate your communications style.

If you want to blow through that, you are not ready for the big leagues. If you want to look this is the eyes of how the search firm is going to view you, not just simply by what you say but by what you don't say, but what you communicate, by what your style of communications is, then you are ready to play at this level.

Don't give short shrift to this because in the past you were less experience than thought this was a trivial exercise and thought someone should call you and talk to you. To play in the big leagues you have to deal with how the big boys and big girls want to be dealt with. They want your best take on how your background fits in. You're going to take the time to reflect and answer the questions in detail to give them great material to make the case for why you fit this role.

DON'T BLOW IT because there is nothing worse from your vantage point, then to not take something like this seriously and then wind up losing an opportunity because you were dismissive of it. That's a mistake. Don't make it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

5 Things C Level Professionals Should Always Do When Engaged in a Search

When I would lead weekends for The ManKind Project, an international men’s organization that supports men live their lives with accountability, generosity and with missions of service, we often spoke of how men with different levels of experience staffing had a completely different perspective of the same weekend.

The less experienced staff might just be thrilled to be there and focused purely on their individual assignments. Those who had staffed several times could like at things beyond the individual task to be done and look to fill in where they saw gaps. Their view of the workshop was at a higher level. We discuss the staff hierarchy and then get to the weekend leader who could see things like an eagle from 100,000 feet and be able to zero in on pivotal moments in the weekend and swoop in and advance it. As leaders, we would mentor/coach key people at critical moments and, only if necessary, step in with the certainty of our authority and responsibility and handle a key moment.

As a C-level professional or other senior professional interviewing with a firm, consider that you are moving to a new land where you may or may not know anyone or understand what your assets are stepping into a situation?

Here are a few ways to explore the new land and come to a decision about whether this is an organization that makes sense for you.

  1. Ask yourself, “What’s most important to you in the next job or organization? What will I need to see or hear to believe it is a great choice for me?” Everything starts with understanding what your needs and desires are. I am not suggesting that you be so rigid as to create a statue or shrine to these desires that you worship at. You do need to understand your target and what you are willing to be flexible about BEFORE you begin your search. This becomes a key document when you evaluate your decisions later on so do not skip over this and think that you know what it is. Until you put it down in writing, you risk tricking yourself into doing things that you really shouldn’t.
  2. What is the firm’s mission? I wrote an article called, “The 1 Question Every C-Level Candidate Should Be Asked (And a Lot of Non-C Suite Potential Hires, Too)” that encouraged employers to ask C Level professionals to ask whether a potential hire understood the firm’s mission. Why is it here (other than to make a lot of money)? Does it have a calling that you can get behind? Is it purely transactional (we sell stuff and try to make customers happy). There is nothing wrong with that if you can get excited by that You need to understand your personal calling and what you hope to get from your next job or organization.
  3. What are their cultural values and how do they mesh with yours? Often, senior professionals lose their way and become purely focused on short term goals that their boss has set for them and lose track of how in the new job everything they do should provide meaning and value to the firm and to themselves. No one will say, “We love renegades and mercenaries. Are you that way?” No, they will talk about integrity and cultural fit. Don’t take this at face value. Ask, “With so many smart capable people, what challenges would you expect we will face in working together to achieve our institutional “Why?”
  4. Use the STAR method of storytelling in reverse . . . with a twist. You have probably learned to tell stories following the STAR method. Describe the situation you stepped into, the tasks you and your team engaged in including any challenges or constraints, the actions you took and the results you achieved. Ask them about the situation you will be stepping into, the tasks you will be asked to perform coupled with challenges and constraints to achieving them, the actions they will want you to take as well as the results expected (and in what time). The twist is to get a clear understanding of the assets and resources available to you. I remember someone I represented as a headhunter who talked about joining a firm and was not understanding what he was stepping into. 80% of the money had been spent but only 20% of the work had been done to date. Ooops! Doomed to fail.
  5. You have a network. Use it. Don’t simply use your network for warm introduction it to validate what you are being told and minimize surprises. Surprises are rarely good. Remember to use your network to validate and confirm.

For you in the C Suite or in senior roles, you have an opportunity to lead, to survey the landscape from 100,000 feet and provide your unique perspective while accomplishing something significant to an organization while satisfying yourself.

Take time and follow the model to get there.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017    

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Are you interested in 1:1 executive job search coaching or business life coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job non-executive jobhunters—videos, my books and guides to job search, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Get Off Your Butt. Do Something! | Job Search Radio

EP 273 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages executives to get offline but and get out of the house.

Summary

I want to talk to you as an executive who's trying to find work and what you need to do while you are looking for work.

You run a line of business you have been an important player in your organization. Now, you are channel surfing. You are watching Netflix. You are waiting for the phone to ring. You know you're supposed to be out there networking. But, the fact of the matter is, a degree of lethargy has said it because you're just not as busy as you once were.

Get busy.

What I find is, like the old saying from "The Shawshank Redemption," "Get busy living or get busy dying." You gotta get out there and make things happen.

Yes, that involves networking, but you're not in a network 8, 9, 10 hours a day. You know that already. Yes, you can go to the gym but how long are you going to work out? Do they get on the treadmill. You're going to walk or jog for a period of time. You're going to lift some weights. You will be out in an hour. Maybe you do a sweat and/or steam afterwards, then maybe it is 2 hours.

What are you going to do the rest of the time? Answer. Find the contract for yourself. Volunteer for an organization. Do something that floats your boat.

Find something that gives you some excitement and some joy. Here's why say that.

If you let the lethargy take hold, what ultimately happens is that is that you interview in a lethargic way. If you've got some joy going on in your life, if you're having some fun on a contract, if you're having some fun doing some volunteer work, lo and behold you perform that much better.

It is so important for you to stay active, rather than sitting around on a meditation cushion for 4 hours a day developing your practice. Don't get me wrong. I like meditating, too, and I do it regularly. But you know what I'm talking about. You have to be ready to perform for an interview.

You don't have to be high-octane workaholic Joe or Jane. What you need to be is "on." Doing something while you're looking for work will go a long way toward helping you

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes
. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

%d bloggers like this: