How to Manage Your Job Search | Job Search Radio

job-search

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to manage your job search to avoid wasting time and put you in control, instead of it running you ragged.

Summary

Today, let's talk about how to organize and manage your job search in order to get into production more quickly. To put it in a nutshell, most of the waste a lot of time. I want to get everything consolidated in a good way so that you can get rolling quickly.

Step number 1. Find an old resume. It has a lot of the data that you need from the "antiquities" in order to lay the position or rewrite your resume.

Step number 2. Start writing down updated information about your role, responsibilities, accomplishments, technology utilized if that is appropriate, money saved, money earned. Start to compile that information.

The ideal thing to do to update your resume is to farm it out to affirm that actually does this. What you will receive back is "a core document" or sometimes called "a base document" to work from. You will need to tailor it a little bit for individual jobs that you apply for. But this is the base document that you start with (the one that goes up on job boards and other places).

Step number 3. Make sure your LinkedIn profile shows this stuff so that is congruent with what your resume is saying

Step number 4., In the summary area of your LinkedIn profile. Put your phone number and email address.

"The recruiters will start calling me then!"

Don't you want them calling you? You want them hunting you and not wasting all your time reaching out all the time, right? This is the time to make sure that your phone number and email address are in your profile.

Step number 5. Make sure your LinkedIn profile as well as your resume is SEO optimized. That is, it contains lots of terms that firms are going to look for when they are hunting for someone like you. After all, if your posting on job boards, firms are looking for someone with your background. You want to make sure that your resume and profile are SEO optimized.

Step number 6. Get your resume up on the job boards. Get that done with. Once you get it back from the resume writing service, put it up on the job boards. I'm not just talking about "the majors." Many of you are in disciplines that allow you to use specialty sites.

Step number 7. This is a tricky one because you're going to have to do a number of things concurrently. You need to start practicing what you are going to say and how you're going to say it for phone interviews, in person interviews to talk about your work (for you. Hiring managers who think you have a big gauge because you interview people all the time, trust me. Most of you don't do a great job of interviewing).

I'm going to throw in a commercial here for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. This is a site where I have a lot of video, podcasts, articles, all my books are there for one low price from. There's a lot of material there. That is going to help you because you need to practice. You need to be more effective. You need to use LinkedIn better than you are doing. That's at JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.

Step number 8. While you are practicing, you need to start networking. A lot of you spend a lot of time studying every ad that you see on the job board. Set up agents to deliver things based upon keywords. Just like the employers do, you didn't need to have agents set up based upon keywords delivering jobs to you.

Will you get a lot of crap? Absolutely. Just delete it. Don't make a fuss out of it. Start looking for things to cover the keywords that you are looking for. Then start tailoring your resume as you start to apply for jobs.

Practice. Practice for interviewing. Practice hard for interviewing. I can't stress this enough because most of you go to interview after interview getting "warmed up."

Meanwhile, you have had 3 or 4 bed interviews. You have a wife, husband, partner were all saying, "Hey! How is it going?". Then, you whine your answer back to them and say something like, "I didn't do a good job. They were so mean to me." You start whining that the employer is the problem when you're the problem. You haven't learned to do your homework yet.

Step number 9. While you are practicing, you have to start networking. You need to be out there networking with people, far more often that you are studying the results from your agents that are set up with the job boards, talking with absolute strangers. Get out to a Chamber of Commerce meeting.

I don't care if you are a senior individual or a junior person or recent college grad, Chamber of Commerce meetings is an underutilized resource for a lot of you. Get to chamber meetings and start networking with people they are.

Go to networking meetings with groups, alumni groups – – there are a lot of different places where you can get out there… And get a business card. They are not expensive anymore. Get a personal business card seeking handed out or get a few apps on your phone that will transmit from one device to another. Don't make the assumption that you can do this with everyone because not everyone has these apps.

While your networking, you want to continue to practice and practice and practice interviewing, tailoring your resume for individual jobs, networking till you're blue in the face and this, now, becomes your job.

If you are working now and deciding to look for a position, this process gets stretched out. You definitely need to hire a resume writer because most of you stink at resume writing.

Hire a resume writer. Get your LinkedIn profile up to date. You can hire someone like me to critique it. Once you get back from the resume writing service but, at the end of the day, outsource a lot of the nonsense, network, practice, go to JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and sign up. If you have questions during your search, I will answer them for you. That's the key thing about the site. You can ask me questions and get answers back so that you don't make mistakes.

And if you ask yourself, "Why do I have to pay for content," most of you never look for content and you need to get better at job hunting. This is a place where great content is consolidated in one place and you can talk with me and ask questions about your search.

I'm not functioning as a recruiter here. I'm functioning as your coach, answering their questions and I don't have a financial interest in which job you take

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The Salary Negotiation Mistake of Acting from Impatience and Anxiety | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistakes of anxiety and impatience and how to overcome them.

Summary

People make a lot of mistakes in their job search , but none are more costly than the mistakes made during the salary negotiation.

One mistake people make among the many is their impatience with the process of negotiating causes them to turn down offers prematurely. Let me give you an example.

Let's say you receive a job offer for salary that is $5000, $10,000 or $15,000 less than what you been looking for.. The firm won't budge. The job is one that you really like. It is still a salary increase; it is going to pay you market value for what you do. (Remember: market value has a range; it is not one specific number). The firm won't budge and you don't say to yourself, "Well, the cost of commutation is going to save me X number of dollars. They pay for my insurance. I'm getting an extra week of vacation. This adds up to some money for me." Instead, you say to yourself, "They won't budge." You get angry and frustrated because your ego has gotten in the way.

Instead of getting out of control here (You think you're in control here, but you are actually out of control), instead of letting your anxiety level about the negotiation build up so high, I'll start say that you need to start looking at the alternative benefits and start examining their value. Start looking at whether your taxes are going to be lower. Start looking at whether your health insurance costs are going to be lower. All of these add up to money..

Then, ask yourself this question, "Will the pleasure I received from doing this job outweigh the disadvantage of it not being perfect? Will this always get in my way?"

If you're like most people I know, you won't always get in your way. You have to pause before turning things down to ask yourself these questions and act on this advice. Ultimately, opportunities like the one that you are evaluating don't come around all the time. Remember, there may be another good job out there but there may not be. This may actually be what your value is.

Take the time and don't act impatiently and turned down an offer prematurely.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Sounding Like a Mexican Song

EP 853  There is a very dumb mistake that people make on interviews that I find reminds me of someone singing a Mexican song,

Summary

Here, I'm going to talk with you about 1 of those stupid interview mistakes; I use a goofy title for it but you will recognize a pretty quickly. I call it, "Sounding like a Mexican song." When they ask you a question about what you did for your firm or what you do for your firm, this is what you sound like--" I, I, I, I." All you do is talk about yourself. You don't put yourself into the context of how you work with your coworkers. You don't give people a bigger picture of where you fit in.

For example, let's say you are a staff level individual. You are answering the question like, "So, what you do for your firm?"

"I work as a team that is responsible for… The overall group does such and such. My piece of that is .. This. As such, I work with a small subset of individuals that has a budget of X number of dollars that is responsible for... blah blah blah blah." Do you get weren't coming from?

You don't say, "I do this. I do that." You don't just simply say, " I, I, I, I"

The idea is to always contextualize yourself. The people of the picture of where you fit

If you're in executive, you can say that you took over responsibility for a group that is responsible for. You can also say "I manage a slice of business that does such and such. As such, I have responsibility for a budget of $500 million. I have a staff of X number of people that is broken up by.." They you start defining your department. "I have some really talented people working for me who have really helped me look good. Obviously, I provide leadership for this group. But the fact of the matter is that I've hired some very good people and they are individuals who understand what I want and go out and deliver. My job is to really understand what is needed so I interact with people in the business unit so they feel attended to..." Again, do you get weren't coming from here

It is not just about "I I I I." It is about giving people a picture of where you fit in, which are role responsibilities are, size of the budget, size the department... It's all about giving people a sense of size and scope.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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