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Instead of “Responsible for”


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2016/12/24/instead-of-responsible-for

EP 502 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers words you can use instead of “Responsible for” in your resume so that you don’t bore the reader.

Summary

Let's talk today about some No BS Resume Advice. This advice is very straightforward and simple; it is going be read to you, but ultimately comes down to a lot of resumes use the phrase, "responsible for." Read the 10 or 15 times and your eyes start to glaze over and it becomes hard to pay attention to what has been written.

Instead, here are a few alternatives for that phrase that you can substitute depending upon the circumstance. You can pick and choose which ones they are. But this will eliminate the repetition of the phrase, "responsible for."

Here they are:
Handled
Managed
Led
Chaired (as in, "chaired a committee")

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Ep. 602 all him. I don’t think we went tomorrow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

I’m Interviewing at a Company Where Someone I Didn’t Get Along With Works (VIDEO)


How do I handle this?

Summary

I received the question from someone that I thought was very useful. It describes a situation where a person (I'm not going to identify gender) was interviewing with the firm and had already met the president, but then discovered that someone that they fought with regularly, was employed at the firm in a senior sales role. And they handle it?

I'm sorry that this has occurred. Disagreements, sometimes political, sometimes in the course of selling, people butt heads with one another. That is sufficiently difficult for you indicates how vehement the differences were. Let me divide the scenarios into 2. One is big company environment. A few thousand people. This is a lead salesperson. I don't know the role that you're interviewing for. But, given that your writing, I will assume that is also a sales role, perhaps where you might even interact with this person regularly.

At a major corporation, I might let things roll. I might not really address the issue head-on. Again, I'm operating with a limited amount of information so I don't know whether this actually will be someone that you interact with daily or not. If you would interact with them daily. My advice might be more like the next piece of advice I would give. If this is with a big company, I might not call this person because (let me just pick the name of the bank and use it as an example). You are interviewing at Capital One-- there are tens of thousands of people who work for it. What is the likelihood that the president of this firm is going to contact the salesperson in that organization for permission to hire you? Pretty damn small.

So, in the monster firms I wouldn't bother unless you know for fact that this person would be interacting with you. If that were the case, the advice I would give would be also represents smaller companies. In smaller companies and in large firms where you would interact with the person, I would call this person up immediately.

"Hi! I just met with so-and-so. I know we had our differences for years. The fact is I am a different person than I was then. I've learned some things. I'm sure you are different person than you were then. I just wanted you to know that I'm interviewing with your company. I hope you can see that I am different that I was then."

This person may stand in your way. This person may say, "Yeah. It was a tough time then..." Whatever it is, they may say something more appealing in conciliatory, Just as you have said to them. I just believe it's better off to confront his head on with the person that you have the issue with. That's because if you believe they are going to be contacted, then you might as well get it done with so that in this way, if it is going to happen (or as a former colleague of mine once said, "You either blow it in or you blow it out."), It's either going to happen or it isn't. There is no gray here. This persons other than standing your way or they aren't.

If they aren't, great! If they are, get it done with by saying to this person, "I'm a different person than I was then; I hope you can put the past behind us. My goal is not to be rude. I just want to make a living. I hope you can put the past behind you." Then, let it go. That's because obviously there's enough history there that your concern, which suggests that there was a serious problem.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Naming Your Resume File | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/16/naming-your-resume-file/

Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter explains how you should name your resume before you start to email it to people.

Summary

I get tons of resumes. You save them. You have to rename them. That's because all of you take no time and name your resume, "resume.doc." That's a big help in finding your resume. Your is a very simple convention for naming your resume.

Ready?

1st name.last name.resume.doc

Really simple, isn't it? 1st name. Last name.resume.doc or put – 's between each of them.

Your resume needs to be found easily. Naming it resume.doc does nothing to help people find you in the morass of her applicant tracking systems, and the morass of our Outlook files. Just change the naming.

If you are sending a cover letter, I'm not good tell you to do the same thing. there. Only put the cover letter as the body of your email instead of as a separate file.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

It Starts With Courage

With appreciation to Lance Secretan

 

I remember my first day of kindergarten many years ago at PS 90 in The It Starts With CourageBronx, NY. My mother was an immigrant who spoke accented English, taking me to class two blocks from our apartment on The Grand Concourse. She and my teacher walked me to my desk and offered me the loveliest look that I could imagine. My mother told me that she would be back a little later to pick me up and that my teacher would be looking out for me.

After a while, I learned another lesson. The lesson was that if I were to succeed in school, my job was to shit up, do what I was told, regurgitate a bunch of things when I was told to do it . . . OR ELSE I wouldn’t get into a good college.

Some years later, I attended CCNY in Harlem. I attended my classes and lectures but quickly learned that the lesson of college I was being given was, “Shut up. Do what you are told. Regurgitate a bunch of stuff when we tell you OR ELSE,” I won’t get a good job.

And when I found my job in recruiting upon graduation, I learned a similar lesson– “Shut up. Do what you are told. Regurgitate a bunch of It Starts With Couragestuff when we tell you OR ELSE . . . “We’ll fire you! Is it any wonder that we live in times where people seem puzzled when they dedicate themselves to their employer, do their best and eventually are brought into a conference room and laid off. I have listened to many executives and staff alike lament about having done a great job and feeling betrayed.

“I did a great job!”

“My reviews were uniformly exceptional”

I keep hearing my own voice complaining about getting an B in a class when I thought I deserved an A. There was nothing I could say that would get the grade changed but I was seeking approval from an instructor who disagreed with my view of my work.

Yes, we all have bosses and teachers who evaluate our work. As a headhunter, I reported to the clients who paid me (and job hunters who didn’t pay me thought I reported to them), as well as to a business owner who demanded perfection from my work that was never achievable.

But the truth was I forgot the most important person who was part of my org structure.

Me.

You see, I fell prey to all the industrial conditioning I had received growing up wanting me to be “cooperative” or “a team player.” I lost track of myself with the push to be selfish in order to achieve sales goals (actual sales goals and, before that, grades).  I succumbed to the motivation (the external pressure to comply with institutions and systems that were making sausage) of the systems I lived and worked in and lost my inspiration (the internal desire, independent of external pressure for conformity).

I became a high achiever who really didn’t care but did great work. I became someone who kept looking for unique ways to do what I did differently than others yet still meet my performance goals.

I hated it because all I was doing was making “artisanal sausage” and not doing what I really wanted. Maybe that willingness to sacrifice is part of being adult. I just never really found the correct percentage of sacrifice vs. self-satisfaction.

I hope you have.

I was introduced to Lance Secretan and a model he has called, “The CASTLE® Principles

Courage

Authenticity

Service

Truthfulness

Love

Effectiveness.

 

Castle.

 

For a while, I wrestled with the idea of authenticity and truthfulness being redundant terms until I grew to see that authenticity was internal truthfulness or being genuine whereas truthfulness was how I might relate with the world at large.

However, as in the word, “Castle,” It truly does start with courage. It takes courage to face oneself and change.        It’s why I now coach instead of headhunt.

As a headhunter, I found too many instances where my truthfulness was encouraged to be compromised and, thus, my truthfulness disappear. It was hard to watch a large check evaporate into thin air after doing so much work.

I found not caring about the people I represented or my clients. The love was lost in what I did and in the people I was hired to serve.

As a result, my effectiveness started to wane, all because I lacked the courage to change.

 

It started with courage and the desire to live life on my terms according to these principles. I can help you, too.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunterwhat seems like one hundred years. His work involves executive job search coaching, business life coaching for self-employed people who have a lunatic for a boss and leadership coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in coaching from me?  Email me at[email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameH[email protected]

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Using Links to Stand Out | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/02/15/using-links-to-stand-out/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses. added adding links to your resume.

Summary

Over the course of time, most resumes are pretty obvious and predictable.

There's one thing that you can do is include URLs to other places where you have a web presence.. Whether that is LinkedIn, Twitter, Github, stack overflow... Whatever the site is will you have a web presence (and a good web presence, obviously), it serves you well because it gives you an opportunity to distinguish yourself from the people that you are competing with.

You can show samples of your work there. For example, creative people can take people to another site where they have a portfolio. If you're an IT person and have developed code is available for download, there's an opportunity to take people to a page where it is available through that link.

Don't just simply stick to her resume. Include a link to the sort of things that will allow an employer to get a richer view of you and your capabilities and you will stand out from the people you are competing with regularly.


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Surprise Third Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 867 What do you do when you have been led to believe or told that there would be two interviews and a decision and suddenly there is a third interview?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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