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How to Learn from Being Rejected

How to Learn from Being Rejected | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/02/28/how-to-learn-from-being-rejected/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to use these ideas to learn from being turned down for a job.

Summary

You not going to get every job that you interview for and I do not get a get an interview for every job you submit your resume to. This isn't about criticism. This is about learning from the experience. I want to focus on the situations where you have been interviewed and rejected..

I think it's important to start off by acknowledging any feelings that you have. Are you feeling mad? Are you feeling sad? Give yourself a little bit of time. I'm not talking about weeks. I'm talking about an hour where if you are angry, beat up something in your home or apartment. I don't mean a person. I am referring to taking a tennis racket and hit the pillow. If you are sad, it is okay to cry.

Then, you move onto the next thing which is, "How did they analyze you?" How did they evaluate and assess you? What were they looking for in the course of the evaluation? How well did you answer their questions? Was that really your best or did you give them something that was 50% of your best?

Most people when they start doing their self critique, "I did a great job!" Maybe you didn't. Give yourself a little bit of time. Review your answers to their questions. Then, ask yourself, "Could I have done better?" That's asking your self just to be clear about that.

Here's the next thing to do – – within a short period of time of having the rejection communicated to you, send an email or text if that is available to you, directed to the person that you interviewed with and ask, "Could I get a few minutes of your time? I just want to get your feedback for areas of improvement. " Particularly in the case of final interviews where it is you, and 1 or 2 other people that you have been competing with, this is a great approach.

You called, set up a meeting, coffee, whatever, and then say, "I don't want to ask you why you picked the other person. I want to ask you where could I have done a better job? Where was my experience deficient in your eyes or how was the other person's experience, superior to mine so I can learn from that?" Especially, in a case where you are a finalist, this is a terrific approach. The reason I say that is because there are a lot of instances where the person they choose doesn't work out. Who do you think they start thinking of right away? You.

Getting that kind of feedback and then acting on it for your own benefit will help you develop the skills, knowledge and experience to be more effective in your next interview and, at the same time, allow them to maintain the contact with you, think of you should something happen and a new role opens up. As a matter of fact, you can say to them, "I was really so impressed with you and with your organization. If something else opens up please let me know."

This isn't about begging. I'm sure you didn't hear any sound of begging it and what I suggest you say. You don't want to sound like a beggar at that point. You just want to simply say what I previously suggested. Often, they will come back to you with something else.

This is an approach that really will be helpful to you. It may result in the job without firm. But, more likely, you can take that feedback, use it constructively and apply it to the next interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Will A Company Reject A Candidate with Excellent Technical Skills But Lacking Social Skills?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/28/will-a-company-reject-a-candidate-with-excellent-technical-skills-but-lacking-so

EP 848 I think this is a great question that affects so many people, particularly those who work outside of their native land.  I give my typical no BS advice but a solution so that does not affect you forever.

Summary

The question I received was, "Will accompany reject a candidate with excellent technical skills but lacking social skills?" I know what you want the answer to be but the fact is what you want and what the reality is are different. I want to take it across the life-cycle of your career to explain why.

As a very junior person, you have a chance. However, if you stay static with having poor social skills you won't have a chance.

Before I go further, let me ask, "What are poor social skills?" Generally, that would be interpreted as poor oral communications and/or more written communications. Rude behavior. Ineffective behavior In group situations while working in meetings or with others.

Who would want to work with someone who is rude or sullen. You work with other people. Whether it is in the US or other countries There is the hope that people will get along with one another. You may be dedicated to your craft, but part of your craft involves relating to others. For example, you as a technical professional have to attend meetings where you communicate your ideas. If you cannot communicate ideas, you are not an effective craftsman. That's the reality to it.

It's kind of like an artist he doesn't know how to market themselves or a coach who doesn't know how to promote themselves. I could be the greatest coach in the world (by the way, I'm pretty damn good) But if no one knows about it,, I'm not can be coaching anyone am I? If you have poor social skills, and you are not allowed to attend meetings, How will anyone know that you have great ideas to improve their environment?

So, at the beginning phase of your career, you have a chance; However, is not going to last long because they are going to push you aside pretty quickly. As you get mid-level and higher level, you cannot get away with poor oral communications, poor writing skills, bad behavior with colleagues, Ineffective communications. Why? Because it becomes magnified even more.

You are expected to lead situations. You are expected to be the person who talks to people within the organization outside of the technical areas to elicit information about what they need & how you can go about serving them. You are supporting them; you're working on budgets for a group; you are hiring people. How do you do that with poor social skills? You can't.

Social skills can be improved on. Like technical skills, when you were 6-year-old girl or boy learning how to code, were you great at that time? No, but you had an aptitude a you learned. You had mentors, coaches and teachers who helped you become better. The same thing applies with social skills. You can learn to get better at those, too. I don't care what profession you are in, we are talking about technical profession now, you can get better at these things if you work at them.

I want to be clear that I am a big proponent that you emphasize your strengths as being the core of your background but you have to improve the secondary skills in order to have a career in the primary ones. They go hand-in-hand, but your energy should be focused on your technical skills.

Again, will you be rejected? Probably, Because they'll never know what you know because you can't communicate, right? It is in life are going to hand you a piece of paper or a tablet And say, "Take this test and if you pass the test you will be hired." Managers want to know that you understand what they are telling you AND that you have growth potential. Without those, you are not going to get hired.

So, again, you have a chance if you're the junior level however, as you become involved in the organization, you have no chance.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why Interviews Die.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why interviews die and what you can do to avoid t him him him hat from happening.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about why interviews die.

You know, you're sitting with the employer and you just have that sinking feeling like this is a huge fail.

There are number of reasons why they fail. The 1st 1 is because the hiring manager reviewed your resume and interpreted something you wrote that you didn't intend it to say. That mistake is from the employer standpoint. That's not your fault. Sometimes, they read things into your resume and wish and hope and think and pray that maybe you have that particular experience. And, you know, within 5 minutes. Everyone knows that you don't have the background that they are looking for.

Another reason is that is your fault. Sometimes, you overstated skill or experience or success, and, if you desire to get that interview, you oversold yourself. That's your fault.

You wasted your time. You wasted someone else's time. I have that happen in resumes all the time. People send resumes and they really don't have the experience that the resume suggests I can tell within 2 minutes at that is the case. I just get them off the phone fast.

Don't overstate what you can do. By the same token, don't understated. Just be accurate.

Sometimes , "fail because, frankly, the interviewer gets lost in the thought. They have other things on their plate and interviewing is 1 of 25 things they may have, to contend with on a given day. So, for whatever the reason, the timing wasn't right for the interview. You are stuck sitting there or trying to talk with them and realize pretty quickly that you've lost them attention.

Finally, this 1 is your fault, you are boring. They ask you a question, you never organize your thoughts around this topic and you go off and drone on and are absolutely awful and how you present your ideas. You give long-winded answers to questions that need to be answered in 35 to 45 seconds.

What can you do to avoid this? The easiest thing is to ask them about the role that you're going to be interviewing for. Just don't accept the interview. Asked him to talk with you about the job and exploring a bit. This way, if they are projecting experience onto you that you don't have, you can investigate further and say, "I really haven't done what you're looking for. This is what I have done. Does that work for you?" If they say, "no," you save everyone a bunch of time.

Another thing you can do is don't exaggerate. Lay out exactly what you know and what you've done. Exaggeration just put you in the position of wasting a lot of folk's time.

If you get a sense that the interviewer is often thought (if you're in a phone interview this is a really easy one), this is one trick – – cough. Doing a quick cough will jolt them back to attention. If you are in an in person interview, shift your position a little bit and that will get them back.

To avoid droning on, pay attention. Here the question if you are in person and stay on point. If you're doing this over the phone. Very simply, shut down the question on a slip of paper (you do have your resume in front of you for a phone interview, don't you). Johnson notes down on your resume and let that remind you how to stay on point.

Finally, keep your answers to 30 to 45 seconds. Where possible. What I found is that when people go over 45 seconds. The interviewer starts to mentally "channel surf" and start thinking about other thoughts other than you. Keep your answers brief and to the point and. You'll find that you not going to wind up losing them.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about why interviews die.

You know, you're sitting with the employer and you just have that sinking feeling like this is a huge fail.

There are number of reasons why they fail. The 1st 1 is because the hiring manager reviewed your resume and interpreted something you wrote that you didn't intend it to say. That mistake is from the employer standpoint. That's not your fault. Sometimes, they read things into your resume and wish and hope and think and pray that maybe you have that particular experience. And, you know, within 5 minutes. Everyone knows that you don't have the background that they are looking for.

Another reason is that is your fault. Sometimes, you overstated skill or experience or success, and, if you desire to get that interview, you oversold yourself. That's your fault.

You wasted your time. You wasted someone else's time. I have that happen in resumes all the time. People send resumes and they really don't have the experience that the resume suggests I can tell within 2 minutes at that is the case. I just get them off the phone fast.

Don't overstate what you can do. By the same token, don't understated. Just be accurate.

Sometimes , "fail because, frankly, the interviewer gets lost in the thought. They have other things on their plate and interviewing is 1 of 25 things they may have, to contend with on a given day. So, for whatever the reason, the timing wasn't right for the interview. You are stuck sitting there or trying to talk with them and realize pretty quickly that you've lost them attention.

Finally, this 1 is your fault, you are boring. They ask you a question, you never organize your thoughts around this topic and you go off and drone on and are absolutely awful and how you present your ideas. You give long-winded answers to questions that need to be answered in 35 to 45 seconds.

What can you do to avoid this? The easiest thing is to ask them about the role that you're going to be interviewing for. Just don't accept the interview. Asked him to talk with you about the job and exploring a bit. This way, if they are projecting experience onto you that you don't have, you can investigate further and say, "I really haven't done what you're looking for. This is what I have done. Does that work for you?" If they say, "no," you save everyone a bunch of time.

Another thing you can do is don't exaggerate. Lay out exactly what you know and what you've done. Exaggeration just put you in the position of wasting a lot of folk's time.

If you get a sense that the interviewer is often thought (if you're in a phone interview this is a really easy one), this is one trick – – cough. Doing a quick cough will jolt them back to attention. If you are in an in person interview, shift your position a little bit and that will get them back.

To avoid droning on, pay attention. Here the question if you are in person and stay on point. If you're doing this over the phone. Very simply, shut down the question on a slip of paper (you do have your resume in front of you for a phone interview, don't you). Johnson notes down on your resume and let that remind you how to stay on point.

Finally, keep your answers to 30 to 45 seconds. Where possible. What I found is that when people go over 45 seconds. The interviewer starts to mentally "channel surf" and start thinking about other thoughts other than you. Keep your answers brief and to the point and. You'll find that you not going to wind up losing them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Avoid Premature Negotiation and Other Negotiation Tips

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with a few salary negotiation tips to help you when you receive your offer.

Summary

When all is said and done, some people start negotiating from the get go. All that happens is you piss off the interviewers because all they think you are in there to do is negotiate, negotiate, negotiate while they are there to evaluate and assess you.

Your initial job is to make them fall in love because as I've said many times, no love, no money, no honey. You don't get the opportunity to go to work at these places. If, at the end of the day, you don't prove your value to them. . Thus, the 1st thing is to make them fall in love because then they are more willing to negotiate. That is step number 1. Avoid premature negotiation issues.

2. Once you get the offer, that's when the negotiating really should start. You wait until the offer has been made. Some people start negotiating, thinking that the economy is booming when it isn't or they stop negotiating when it is booming because they think it isn't. You have to know the climate that you are operating in in order to know whether you will have an opportunity to really move the needle on the salary part of the offer.

3. This is something that students are often told-- don't negotiate just for the sake of it. I respectfully disagree. I want you to try negotiating and see if you can up the number. Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." It is a very simple and gentle approach to negotiating that won't piss anyone off. That's the 2nd thing.

4. Don't forget that if you are negotiating with the small to midsize firm, there are benefits that you might be able to negotiate. For example, there is that Masters program that you want to take. See if you can negotiate tuition reimbursement as a part of your offer. Big companies won't negotiate this kind of stuff. It's either in their policies and procedures or not because, from their vantage point, they are trying to avoid lawsuits.

After all, just to use an example, if you are the white heterosexual male and they did for you, why did they not give this concession to the non-white heterosexual male and they gave it to you. It becomes a lawsuit in the making. Big firms don't negotiate. Small companies may in some midsize firms will if there policies and procedures are not completely in place. Don't forget to negotiate some of the secondary items and just focus on salary.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Learn from Being Rejected

Will A Company Reject A Candidate with Excellent Technical Skills But Lacking Social Skills

EP 848 I think this is a great question that affects so many people, particularly those who work outside of their native land.  I give my typical no BS advice but a solution so that does not affect you forever.

Summary

The question I received was, "Will accompany reject a candidate with excellent technical skills but lacking social skills?" I know what you want the answer to be but the fact is what you want and what the reality is are different. I want to take it across the life-cycle of your career to explain why.

As a very junior person, you have a chance. However, if you stay static with having poor social skills you won't have a chance.

Before I go further, let me ask, "What are poor social skills?" Generally, that would be interpreted as poor oral communications and/or more written communications. Rude behavior. Ineffective behavior In group situations while working in meetings or with others.

Who would want to work with someone who is rude or sullen. You work with other people. Whether it is in the US or other countries There is the hope that people will get along with one another. You may be dedicated to your craft, but part of your craft involves relating to others. For example, you as a technical professional have to attend meetings where you communicate your ideas. If you cannot communicate ideas, you are not an effective craftsman. That's the reality to it.

It's kind of like an artist he doesn't know how to market themselves or a coach who doesn't know how to promote themselves. I could be the greatest coach in the world (by the way, I'm pretty damn good) But if no one knows about it,, I'm not can be coaching anyone am I? If you have poor social skills, and you are not allowed to attend meetings, How will anyone know that you have great ideas to improve their environment?

So, at the beginning phase of your career, you have a chance; However, is not going to last long because they are going to push you aside pretty quickly. As you get mid-level and higher level, you cannot get away with poor oral communications, poor writing skills, bad behavior with colleagues, Ineffective communications. Why? Because it becomes magnified even more.

You are expected to lead situations. You are expected to be the person who talks to people within the organization outside of the technical areas to elicit information about what they need & how you can go about serving them. You are supporting them; you're working on budgets for a group; you are hiring people. How do you do that with poor social skills? You can't.

Social skills can be improved on. Like technical skills, when you were 6-year-old girl or boy learning how to code, were you great at that time? No, but you had an aptitude a you learned. You had mentors, coaches and teachers who helped you become better. The same thing applies with social skills. You can learn to get better at those, too. I don't care what profession you are in, we are talking about technical profession now, you can get better at these things if you work at them.

I want to be clear that I am a big proponent that you emphasize your strengths as being the core of your background but you have to improve the secondary skills in order to have a career in the primary ones. They go hand-in-hand, but your energy should be focused on your technical skills.

Again, will you be rejected? Probably, Because they'll never know what you know because you can't communicate, right? It is in life are going to hand you a piece of paper or a tablet And say, "Take this test and if you pass the test you will be hired." Managers want to know that you understand what they are telling you AND that you have growth potential. Without those, you are not going to get hired.

So, again, you have a chance if you're the junior level however, as you become involved in the organization, you have no chance.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How Do I Turn Down a Job Offer With Class When The Money Is Too Low?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I am going to turn down their offer because they came in too low. How do I turn it down with class?

Summary

I received an interesting question is really geared toward a freelancer by think they can be applied to job hunters, as well. It's basically about turning down an offer. When the money isn't good enough and how do you do it with class. Here's the original note and then I will translate it for job hunters.

This person is a freelance writer and I get cold calls for job opportunities. They are in a position where they can afford to be choosy about which projects they take on. GREAT! This is exactly what everyone should do, whether you are freelancer or job Hunter.

He got a call from someone with an interesting job description but the money was way low for what he normally works on with his clients. He doesn't specify a percentage but just describes it as "way low."

"How do I turn this offer down with class while subtly making the point that they want to hire someone with my capabilities, they need to pay me 8 times what they offered me?"

As a job hunter, you are into problems like this all the time. You get calls from recruiters, you get calls from referrals, that land on your doorstep and the money is way off.

Job hunters often react foolishly by taking it personally. They get indignant. "WHAT!? This job should be paying . . . " They bark and they carry on like a little poodle. They bark at the recruiter. They bark at the manager who has the particular need. They bark at the person who wants to refer them. It's goofy.There is a better way to do it and one demonstrates class

What you simply say is, "I really appreciate you contacting me. It sounds like a great opportunity, but my rate is much higher than what you're prepared to offer for this role. I can recommend people to you and perhaps for the list over to you, but I think you may run into the same problem. For me, this is about 20% of what I normally charge. I will love to help you in the future, but this is way low for me. Here are few people who might be willing to take up on a project like this." Then you refer them to others.

Referring them to others is a classy thing to do. Then, is up to those individuals to decide whether it is good enough for them or whether they should refer the job out to others as well. Doing it in a way with style is to demonstrate that you have people you can point them to is to do it in a way that is not shaming, critical or disturbed in any way by what has been proposed. It is flattering that they reached out to you but, the fact of the matter is, the money isn't right.

Better to do it with style as you requested and just give them a referral to someone else.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

No B. S. Resume Advice: Templates?


In this short video, Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from using resume templates.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about resume templates. 1st of all, there are millions of them all over the web. Frankly, don't use them. I'm going to make it that simple. Don't use them. Here's why.

1. You have to comply with their format. Yes, you can look for lots of different formats. You really want to take that time?

2. The issue is that the template or the format. The issue is the content that you are putting in. You may think is attractive and presents very nicely, but it may cause problems for the reader. All of us, whether a corporation or a recruiting firm, are using applicant tracking systems. We are looking to parse data. We are not manually rekeying things. We don't want to copy your resume and pasted into your system. Whether a corporate recruiter or an agency recruiter, all the software is designed to parse resumes into particular fields. A lot of the templates have embedded headers. That can cause a problem because a lot of applicant tracking systems have trouble reading embedded header. They have to manually rekeying your information. You are now officially a pain in the ass.

3. Some people aren't cognizant of how the resume fits into the template. Sometimes, I see resumes that are cut off midfield or midsentence because a person didn't pay attention the fact that the sentence that they were writing didn't fit into the field correctly for the template that they were using. As a result, the sentence scrolls out of view. As a result, you always have to take a look at it.

4. The real issue is about parsing and ensuring that your resume is parsable by all of us who receive it. For large companies, the issue becomes about government reporting. They may delete your resume if it doesn't parse.

If you're using the template, you may have problems that you will never be conscious of, but are impacted by. If you're sending it to a recruiting firm, you don't want to be a problem resume to them and frankly, most of the template so you can look that good.

It is fine to copy the look of the template, but don't actually use one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

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How to Learn from Being Rejected

How to Learn from Being Rejected | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to use these ideas to learn from being turned down for a job.

Summary

You not going to get every job that you interview for and I do not get a get an interview for every job you submit your resume to. This isn't about criticism. This is about learning from the experience. I want to focus on the situations where you have been interviewed and rejected..

I think it's important to start off by acknowledging any feelings that you have. Are you feeling mad? Are you feeling sad? Give yourself a little bit of time. I'm not talking about weeks. I'm talking about an hour where if you are angry, beat up something in your home or apartment. I don't mean a person. I am referring to taking a tennis racket and hit the pillow. If you are sad, it is okay to cry.

Then, you move onto the next thing which is, "How did they analyze you?" How did they evaluate and assess you? What were they looking for in the course of the evaluation? How well did you answer their questions? Was that really your best or did you give them something that was 50% of your best?

Most people when they start doing their self critique, "I did a great job!" Maybe you didn't. Give yourself a little bit of time. Review your answers to their questions. Then, ask yourself, "Could I have done better?" That's asking your self just to be clear about that.

Here's the next thing to do – – within a short period of time of having the rejection communicated to you, send an email or text if that is available to you, directed to the person that you interviewed with and ask, "Could I get a few minutes of your time? I just want to get your feedback for areas of improvement. " Particularly in the case of final interviews where it is you, and 1 or 2 other people that you have been competing with, this is a great approach.

You called, set up a meeting, coffee, whatever, and then say, "I don't want to ask you why you picked the other person. I want to ask you where could I have done a better job? Where was my experience deficient in your eyes or how was the other person's experience, superior to mine so I can learn from that?" Especially, in a case where you are a finalist, this is a terrific approach. The reason I say that is because there are a lot of instances where the person they choose doesn't work out. Who do you think they start thinking of right away? You.

Getting that kind of feedback and then acting on it for your own benefit will help you develop the skills, knowledge and experience to be more effective in your next interview and, at the same time, allow them to maintain the contact with you, think of you should something happen and a new role opens up. As a matter of fact, you can say to them, "I was really so impressed with you and with your organization. If something else opens up please let me know."

This isn't about begging. I'm sure you didn't hear any sound of begging it and what I suggest you say. You don't want to sound like a beggar at that point. You just want to simply say what I previously suggested. Often, they will come back to you with something else.

This is an approach that really will be helpful to you. It may result in the job without firm. But, more likely, you can take that feedback, use it constructively and apply it to the next interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Final Interview Rejection

How to Learn from Being Rejected (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to use this device to learn from being turned down for a job.

 

Summary

You not going to get every job that you interview for and I do not get a get an interview for every job you submit your resume to. This isn't about criticism. This is about learning from the experience. I want to focus on the situations where you have been interviewed and rejected..

I think it's important to start off by acknowledging any feelings that you have. Are you feeling mad? Are you feeling sad? Give yourself a little bit of time. I'm not talking about weeks. I'm talking about an hour where if you are angry, beat up something in your home or apartment. I don't mean a person. I am referring to taking a tennis racket and hit the pillow. If you are sad, it is okay to cry.

Then, you move onto the next thing which is, "How did they analyze you?" How did they evaluate and assess you? What were they looking for in the course of the evaluation? How well did you answer their questions? Was that really your best or did you give them something that was 50% of your best?

Most people when they start doing their self critique, "I did a great job!" Maybe you didn't. Give yourself a little bit of time. Review your answers to their questions. Then, ask yourself, "Could I have done better?" That's asking your self just to be clear about that.

Here's the next thing to do – – within a short period of time of having the rejection communicated to you, send an email or text if that is available to you, directed to the person that you interviewed with and ask, "Could I get a few minutes of your time? I just want to get your feedback for areas of improvement. " Particularly in the case of final interviews where it is you, and 1 or 2 other people that you have been competing with, this is a great approach.

You called, set up a meeting, coffee, whatever, and then say, "I don't want to ask you why you picked the other person. I want to ask you where could I have done a better job? Where was my experience deficient in your eyes or how was the other person's experience, superior to mine so I can learn from that?" Especially, in a case where you are a finalist, this is a terrific approach. The reason I say that is because there are a lot of instances where the person they choose doesn't work out. Who do you think they start thinking of right away? You.

Getting that kind of feedback and then acting on it for your own benefit will help you develop the skills, knowledge and experience to be more effective in your next interview and, at the same time, allow them to maintain the contact with you, think of you should something happen and a new role opens up. As a matter of fact, you can say to them, "I was really so impressed with you and with your organization. If something else opens up please let me know."

This isn't about begging. I'm sure you didn't hear any sound of begging it and what I suggest you say. You don't want to sound like a beggar at that point. You just want to simply say what I previously suggested. Often, they will come back to you with something else.

This is an approach that really will be helpful to you. It may result in the job without firm. But, more likely, you can take that feedback, use it constructively and apply it to the next interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

Final Interview Rejection

How to Learn from Being Rejected | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to use these ideas to learn from being turned down for a job.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TO JOBSEARCHCOACHINGHQ.COM

Summary

You not going to get every job that you interview for and I do not get a get an interview for every job you submit your resume to. This isn't about criticism. This is about learning from the experience. I want to focus on the situations where you have been interviewed and rejected..

I think it's important to start off by acknowledging any feelings that you have. Are you feeling mad? Are you feeling sad? Give yourself a little bit of time. I'm not talking about weeks. I'm talking about an hour where if you are angry, beat up something in your home or apartment. I don't mean a person. I am referring to taking a tennis racket and hit the pillow. If you are sad, it is okay to cry.

Then, you move onto the next thing which is, "How did they analyze you?" How did they evaluate and assess you? What were they looking for in the course of the evaluation? How well did you answer their questions? Was that really your best or did you give them something that was 50% of your best?

Most people when they start doing their self critique, "I did a great job!" Maybe you didn't. Give yourself a little bit of time. Review your answers to their questions. Then, ask yourself, "Could I have done better?" That's asking your self just to be clear about that.

Here's the next thing to do – – within a short period of time of having the rejection communicated to you, send an email or text if that is available to you, directed to the person that you interviewed with and ask, "Could I get a few minutes of your time? I just want to get your feedback for areas of improvement. " Particularly in the case of final interviews where it is you, and 1 or 2 other people that you have been competing with, this is a great approach.

You called, set up a meeting, coffee, whatever, and then say, "I don't want to ask you why you picked the other person. I want to ask you where could I have done a better job? Where was my experience deficient in your eyes or how was the other person's experience, superior to mine so I can learn from that?" Especially, in a case where you are a finalist, this is a terrific approach. The reason I say that is because there are a lot of instances where the person they choose doesn't work out. Who do you think they start thinking of right away? You.

Getting that kind of feedback and then acting on it for your own benefit will help you develop the skills, knowledge and experience to be more effective in your next interview and, at the same time, allow them to maintain the contact with you, think of you should something happen and a new role opens up. As a matter of fact, you can say to them, "I was really so impressed with you and with your organization. If something else opens up please let me know."

This isn't about begging. I'm sure you didn't hear any sound of begging it and what I suggest you say. You don't want to sound like a beggar at that point. You just want to simply say what I previously suggested. Often, they will come back to you with something else.

This is an approach that really will be helpful to you. It may result in the job without firm. But, more likely, you can take that feedback, use it constructively and apply it to the next interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

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