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Changing Careers | Job Search Radio


Sometimes, people find themselves in a professional boat that they no longer like and decide to change careers. Sometimes, people lose their careers because the economy has changed and suddenly discover that they have lost a career they have invested in for a lifetime.

On this show, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with career coach Marc Miller about changing careers and how people can figure out how to get going and land in something they love.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Making a Career Pivot? The Most Important Areas of Your LinkedIn Profile


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Your LinkedIn profile is skewered toward your past. You want to make a pivot but your history doesn’t support it., What are the most important areas of your profile, given that you want to make a pivot.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about those of you are trying to make a career pivot or a career change about using LinkedIn a little differently than you have been conditioned to use it. When you are creating a profile or have created a profile on LinkedIn, often. It is a recitation of your past, rather than an indication of your aspirations or desires for the future.

For example, I worked in executive search for more than 40 years and may depend it into being a coach. Part of the work that I do is around executive job search coaching; part of it relates to life and business coaching. I'm self-employed (I have a corporate entity that I can frame in this way) and if I left my profile intact. For you who is an employee wants to remain an employee of the firm, but pivot to something else, there is a problem here. The problem is that your bio is a recitation of your past rather than a presentation of your future, right?Here are the 2 areas on your LinkedIn profile that are most critical for you and then make a recommendation to you for the remainder of your profile.

To me, the 2 most important areas of your LinkedIn profile if you're making a pit are (1) the line underneath your name where you can talk about what it is you want to be doing and not continue with that statement of what your past was. The other one is (2) the summary area of your LinkedIn profile, where they give you a lot of space to talk about yourself. When you do so, remember that when firms are searching LinkedIn, they think in terms of keywords. You want to use relevant terms for your aspiring industry or field so that when people or firms are searching for someone like what you want to be, they can find you.

In addition, you want to make it easy for them to reach out to you. You don't want them spending the equivalent of $12 or $15 to send an inMail to you. If you are not connected to them. You want to make it easy for them. Put your email address and phone number in the summary area so that they have the ability to reach out to you.

Finally, for your older information, for the stuff that you done up until this point, think about minimizing it,if not eliminated if it is not relevant to what you want to be and what you want to be doing. Think about from the standpoint of the employer. If you think that the work that you've done is going to benefit them, you want to continue to included under each firm that you've worked for eliminated the extraneous. Speak of relevant information for the employer (let me use myself as an example) for my work as a coach. I would go into my background where I evaluate and assess people, advising businesses on improving operations and being more efficient might be part of the work I would convey for my time is being a headhunter that could be useful to a firm now.

You have your equivalent and you always want to be thinking in terms of what a firm wants to know about you and your past that your LinkedIn profile can address and eliminate the rest. I'm sure this is counterintuitive for a lot of you but minimize it, if not eliminate, all the unnecessary text altogether.

To be clear, I'm not saying to take out the jobs or lie. I'm trying to tell you that you always need to be thinking in terms of speaking to employers and so much of what you have done is relevant to what you want to be doing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Changing Careers Part 6


If you are interested in changing careers, this next step is a “can’t miss” video.

Summary

I started off doing a series of videos about changing careers and, along the way, I got distracted and did another series of videos. I want to return to this subject in this video. Let's talk about the next step in your process.

It's really a very important one that too few people follow through on. You can read as much as you want, you can talk to as many people as you like, you can take as many people's brains as you want and engage in lots of different testing that will help you determine appropriate career fields for you. But! There is nothing like spending some time with someone who is in the profession.

I want you to hear that again. There is nothing like spending time with someone who is in the profession.

In doing so, I would like you to do it in multiple parts. The 1st one is the equivalent of an informational interview in job search. You talk with them about the business of what they do and what their typical day is like, the things they wrestle with, the things they love about it and the things they dislike about it… That's really meeting number 1. At the end of it, you might just simply asked them, "Would you mind if I shadowed you for part of a day or volunteered in your office with an eye toward helping? This way, I can observe and notice what goes on."

You see, there is a fantasy that a lot of people develop about what it's like to be (fill in the blank). For example, you work in construction, but what you really want to be is a programmer. Find a way that you can work with a programmer and shadow them to see what their typical day is like. That's because you want to know what the downs are like to see if you can tolerate them. If you can't, maybe this isn't the right calling for you.

Think in terms of following through on something that allows you to learn more about the profession, not book learning it (book learning is fine up to a point, but it doesn't let you experience what it is like to be that person. Get out there and talk to someone in the profession that you are interested in.

I know what I was considering my move into coaching. I spoke to a number of people who worked in the field, got some ideas and spend some time following around with 1 or 2 of them to see what a typical day was like. I asked them questions about how they got clients which is a big part of being a coach. After all, you're not a coach unless you are coaching and thus the way you become a coach is by having clients!

So I followed around with someone, spent time with them in their office as they would speak to potential clients and coach some folks and took some notes down… I didn't hear anything horrible. What I heard was someone who really loves what they were doing and I hope you have that experience as well.

Get out there. Shadow someone. Do an informational interview before hand/ask permission. If you're exploring the field were being a shadow isn't the right thing to do, you can try volunteering. Volunteer in the workplace for the type of work that you want to do.

If you want to be a nutritionist, volunteer in a nutritionist's office. Volunteer in a public agency that does nutrition services for people. Do things that allow you to see what it is like in the field that you want to be involved with.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Change Careers Part 4


I discuss another step in your journey to change careers… This one is focused on you and the life that you want to live.

career-change

Summary

This is part 4 in my series about changing careers. I hope some things had been percolating so far but, if not go back and dig deeper. The idea behind all of this is to get clear about some things that you are weighing about what’s going to be important to you in your career ending your life.

Your life is the next part of this because we can’t partialize or divide work and life as distinctly as some think we should. How is that working for you to make those different things? 

I think that is all part of the same thing which is the life that you live. So I’m going to invite you to look at a few different things today and, again, as always, I want you taking down notes and spending time with this.

The 1st thing I want you to look at is your health. How are you physically at this point? I said in other places that one day I woke up and, try though I might, my weight got away from me. One day I woke up and weight and saw numbers on the scale that I never seen before

I have been working on my health, working with the trainer and that’s become really important to me… To get my health in shape and be fit. As a matter of fact, this morning I had the pleasure of my wife say I look younger!

What kind of environment do I want to live in? Is it an urban area? Is it a rural area?

If it is urban, what type of neighborhood? Where is your ideal place to live in the world? After all, these days, people can do work from a lot of places in the world.

What kind of income do you need?

What you need to support yourself and your family?

What kind of goals do you have for your future?

Is your family important to you? I’m not just speaking about your immediate family. I’m speaking about your extended family. Aging parents, for example or maybe you are the aging parent and you want to be closer to your kids. How does that fit in? Do you need to have some flexibility in order to spend time with them? Do you need time to go to the kids soccer games?

What sort of personal development goals do you have? We tend to focus on work so much that we tend to forget that we can be students in our lives, too. For us to really excel, we need to learn and grow in order to master our circumstances.

These are all things you need to sit down and think about. Take at least an hour with this. Seriously. Minimally, an hour with this exercise. Learn your lessons from it and apply it to your life.

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Change Careers Part 3


This is the 3rd in my series of videos about changing careers focused on helping you identify what you want.

change

Summary

This will continue the various steps I teach in order to evolve. Again, take out your iPad, pen and paper, whatever you like to write with and save , and get to a place where you have no distractions.

This 1 is a difficult exercise.

The question I’m going to ask you to think and write about is, “What’s going to be important to you in your next career?  What will you need to see or hear in order to believe it is a good choice for you?

Sounds easy, doesn’t it?

Usually, however, people define things by what they don’t want to do. They look at their current work and start thinking about the list of, “No’s” that come from the current work. By that I mean, “I don’t want to do this,” or, “I don’t want to do that.”

I will use myself as an example. After many years of doing recruiting, I have moved into coaching and 1 of the things I didn’t like about recruiting was the amount of multitasking (there’s multitasking in every profession but in recruiting, is obscenely heavy multitasking) with constant interruptions.  I became frustrated by that. So I start the think of things that would have less multitasking and fewer interruptions.  You are going to have your list of items that you are not going to want to do.

I want you to pause now and start working on your list.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

How to Change Careers Part 2


This is my 2nd video in the series about changing careers. Grab a pen and paper or your iPad and be prepared to do some homework.

Summary

This is the 2nd in my series of videos about changing careers after all, some of you, like me, have gotten to a point professionally where it feels like time to start looking at other alternatives.

I don’t care what your age is. Whether you are a geezer like me or someone much younger, you just come to realize that this is not fulfilling work that you’re doing and you just want to do something else but are not clear about what you want to do.

Today, we are going to answer some questions that will help you with your evaluation of alternatives. After all, if you are not sure about what to do next, I want to help you instigate your mind in order. Start thinking in new directions.

This is a homework assignment I’m giving you.  It is a series of questions that will help cultivate your thinking about what direction to take.

  1.  “What do I enjoy regardless of the opinions of others?” I think this is a great opening question that allows you to stand out from the influence of others that I certainly know I am influenced by.  “
  2. What would I love doing enough that I would do it for free?
  3. If I had to teach something, what would I teach?”
  4. What would I do that makes me lose track of time?”  It makes you get into the flow when you are doing a bunch of stuff.
  5. What do people typically ask me for help with?”
  6. What makes me feel great about myself?”

These are the starting questions for this part of the process.  So far I’m giving you 6 questions.  Let me add a few more.

7.  “Is there a cause that you really believe in or feel strongly about?

8. “What are your favorite thing is that you have done in the past?  What are they that you have done now?”

9. “What has occurred in the past that you don’t want others to go through?”

When all is said and done, I want you to connect with yourself in doing this process. I want you to really think about it, explore and “feel stuff.”I really think that is the way to go here.  Take some time and review.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Change Careers Part 1


This video begins a series I’m going to do about changing careers and how to go about doing it.

changing-career-at-50-plus

Summary

Changing careers is often will most difficult things a person has to decide to do. You have spent time working in one profession. You’ve been a business owner and, perhaps, decided to go back to corporate, you worked in corporate and now you decide to go into business for yourself or you decide to get a job in a completely unrelated field but you don’t know quite what to do.

These are pretty common scenarios for career changers. I’m beginning a series for those of you who are interested in changing careers with steps that you can take to start the exploration process.

Now, if you think you are suddenly going to have an epiphany, that isn’t the way I’m going to leave this process.  The way you will need to go through. This is with care, with time, and with concern.  So I want you to understand this going into the process, because if you aren’t prepared to take time

you will wind up barking up the wrong tree and not get the results that you want. If that is what you want to do, you don’t need these videos. Where we are going to go with these videos is through a number of steps that you can take that, hopefully, you can stare at and used to evaluate a number of potential opportunities and possibilities, to eliminate ones that don’t fit and stick with ones that do.

Let’s start by looking at this process from the viewpoint of being a child. My son has been looking at a career in the medical profession for the longest time. Recently, he’s come to realize the amount of effort that is going to go into becoming the kind of doctor he said he wanted to become. As a result, his aspirations have rolled back pretty profoundly.

For a lot of job hunters, for a lot of career changers, it is much the same thing. For example, many job changers will say (to use an example that I know), “Oh! I really want to be a quantitative analyst on Wall Street,” without really knowing anything about the profession. Then, when they start to look at it closely, decide that is pretty boring and not a lot of fun for them.

The Starting Line

Here’s where we start today. I want you to sit down and create an enormous list of what your strengths are. You may think of yourself as one way, but I want you to ask those around you about some of the things they see you as being particularly good at.

Are you empathetic with people?
Are you a great listener?
Are you a terrific speaker?
Are you great in front of a camera?

They can be things that you think are dumb… No filtering!

If you like sports on TV, that goes on the list. If you like playing tennis, that goes on the list.

Anything goes on that list for now. Make it long. Make a comprehensive. Take time with it. This is not spending 5 minutes with it and then you are done.

I want you really thinking about.

I like making dinner for my family can go on the list.
I like going to church/the synagogue/no mosque/the meditation center… Whatever it is, it goes on the list. Every last item.

That’s where we are going to start.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Change Careers Part 5


This is the next video my series about changing careers. I’m sure this is not what you would’ve expected.

 

Summary

This is part 5 in my series of how to change careers. It is a little atypical and I’m going to start off the story about myself.

After a while, I started to realize how conditioned I had been to think in certain ways and do certain things. From the time I got into school as a little kid until the time I graduated, the system was conditioning me to think in certain ways and do certain things.

The classic thing is being brought to school as a little kid and learning that what you are supposed to do is shut up, do what you’re told, regurgitate a bunch of things or else you will get into a good college. Eventually, you get into the college and you get the message that you’re supposed to shut up, do what you told, regurgitate a bunch of things or else he will get a good job.

The habit that I was conditioned into was to take direction, do what I was told (What a surprise! I’ve been told this since I was little and the message got through.), not thinking for myself in some ways about what would make me happy.

I got pushed through the system and,, I want to be clear, I got a lot of good stuff out of it, but my heart’s passion has it been the kind of work that I’ve done for so many years and what I had been conditioned to do.

As part of this exercise that eventually led me to coaching, I start to think, “Let’s go crazy!  Tell me some unrealistic things I might try to do.

That’s what the next homework assignment is going to be.  Be unrealistic.  Write down a few things for yourself that in no way, shape or form. Do you think you could possibly do.  

This is part of a liberation process because often the conditioning that you have received causes you to think small in self-limiting ways.  Once you start thinking about it, you might actually be able to do some of them.  It might take some practice and you might not be an expert.  The 1st time you do it.  You might need to get training but it is the sort of thing, that when you were a little might of love doing, but discovered that you weren’t a good enough pitcher to pitch for the Yankees.

Don’t worry if it’s realistic.  Think while. Go crazy!  Write down the sort of things that if your friends heard about it, they might tease you.  Remember, these are true for you and the reaction is their “stuff.”  Don’t let their opinions rule your life right now.  You are trying to figure out what is going to excite you in your life right now and ignite your passion and your career.  That’s the most important thing right now.

Maybe it’s something that you did when you were little.  I have a friend who decided he wanted to run a scuba business in the Bahamas.  He left his job to do scuba.  Maybe that’s your thing.  Just write down 3 things (and if you write down 5 or 10 or 50, that’s. Even better).

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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