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How to Manage Your Job Search | Job Search Radio

job-search

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to manage your job search to avoid wasting time and put you in control, instead of it running you ragged.

Summary

Today, let's talk about how to organize and manage your job search in order to get into production more quickly. To put it in a nutshell, most of the waste a lot of time. I want to get everything consolidated in a good way so that you can get rolling quickly.

Step number 1. Find an old resume. It has a lot of the data that you need from the "antiquities" in order to lay the position or rewrite your resume.

Step number 2. Start writing down updated information about your role, responsibilities, accomplishments, technology utilized if that is appropriate, money saved, money earned. Start to compile that information.

The ideal thing to do to update your resume is to farm it out to affirm that actually does this. What you will receive back is "a core document" or sometimes called "a base document" to work from. You will need to tailor it a little bit for individual jobs that you apply for. But this is the base document that you start with (the one that goes up on job boards and other places).

Step number 3. Make sure your LinkedIn profile shows this stuff so that is congruent with what your resume is saying

Step number 4., In the summary area of your LinkedIn profile. Put your phone number and email address.

"The recruiters will start calling me then!"

Don't you want them calling you? You want them hunting you and not wasting all your time reaching out all the time, right? This is the time to make sure that your phone number and email address are in your profile.

Step number 5. Make sure your LinkedIn profile as well as your resume is SEO optimized. That is, it contains lots of terms that firms are going to look for when they are hunting for someone like you. After all, if your posting on job boards, firms are looking for someone with your background. You want to make sure that your resume and profile are SEO optimized.

Step number 6. Get your resume up on the job boards. Get that done with. Once you get it back from the resume writing service, put it up on the job boards. I'm not just talking about "the majors." Many of you are in disciplines that allow you to use specialty sites.

Step number 7. This is a tricky one because you're going to have to do a number of things concurrently. You need to start practicing what you are going to say and how you're going to say it for phone interviews, in person interviews to talk about your work (for you. Hiring managers who think you have a big gauge because you interview people all the time, trust me. Most of you don't do a great job of interviewing).

I'm going to throw in a commercial here for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. This is a site where I have a lot of video, podcasts, articles, all my books are there for one low price from. There's a lot of material there. That is going to help you because you need to practice. You need to be more effective. You need to use LinkedIn better than you are doing. That's at JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.

Step number 8. While you are practicing, you need to start networking. A lot of you spend a lot of time studying every ad that you see on the job board. Set up agents to deliver things based upon keywords. Just like the employers do, you didn't need to have agents set up based upon keywords delivering jobs to you.

Will you get a lot of crap? Absolutely. Just delete it. Don't make a fuss out of it. Start looking for things to cover the keywords that you are looking for. Then start tailoring your resume as you start to apply for jobs.

Practice. Practice for interviewing. Practice hard for interviewing. I can't stress this enough because most of you go to interview after interview getting "warmed up."

Meanwhile, you have had 3 or 4 bed interviews. You have a wife, husband, partner were all saying, "Hey! How is it going?". Then, you whine your answer back to them and say something like, "I didn't do a good job. They were so mean to me." You start whining that the employer is the problem when you're the problem. You haven't learned to do your homework yet.

Step number 9. While you are practicing, you have to start networking. You need to be out there networking with people, far more often that you are studying the results from your agents that are set up with the job boards, talking with absolute strangers. Get out to a Chamber of Commerce meeting.

I don't care if you are a senior individual or a junior person or recent college grad, Chamber of Commerce meetings is an underutilized resource for a lot of you. Get to chamber meetings and start networking with people they are.

Go to networking meetings with groups, alumni groups – – there are a lot of different places where you can get out there… And get a business card. They are not expensive anymore. Get a personal business card seeking handed out or get a few apps on your phone that will transmit from one device to another. Don't make the assumption that you can do this with everyone because not everyone has these apps.

While your networking, you want to continue to practice and practice and practice interviewing, tailoring your resume for individual jobs, networking till you're blue in the face and this, now, becomes your job.

If you are working now and deciding to look for a position, this process gets stretched out. You definitely need to hire a resume writer because most of you stink at resume writing.

Hire a resume writer. Get your LinkedIn profile up to date. You can hire someone like me to critique it. Once you get back from the resume writing service but, at the end of the day, outsource a lot of the nonsense, network, practice, go to JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and sign up. If you have questions during your search, I will answer them for you. That's the key thing about the site. You can ask me questions and get answers back so that you don't make mistakes.

And if you ask yourself, "Why do I have to pay for content," most of you never look for content and you need to get better at job hunting. This is a place where great content is consolidated in one place and you can talk with me and ask questions about your search.

I'm not functioning as a recruiter here. I'm functioning as your coach, answering their questions and I don't have a financial interest in which job you take

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Don’t Forget . . . | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 610 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not forget to ask about your retirement planning.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the criteria that fewer individuals are using when they evaluate job offers.

It's important to consider the money. It's important to consider the benefits. I want to point this one out because it was a mistake I made early in my career; I just want to make sure that you avoid it in yours. That is, look at retirement planning.

You may be 22. at this point and retirement may be 100 years from now. But, the fact of the matter remains, it can be free money that, when compounded over the course of your career, can be money that you can use and will need. And, trust me when I say this, I wish I had done it differently myself.

With that being the case, there's another thing that people need to evaluate when you evaluate offers-- career pathing. When a firm talks with you about a job offer, you have interviewed about the job they have available today and you need to also ask, "2 or 3 years from now, where am I going to be? What kind of options might exist for me. If I do a great job? What is this firm normally do to rotate people in the organization?"

This is important because, think about it for a second, if you were to do the same job for the next 5 years of your life, 15 years of your life, 40 years of your life, I think you might want to put a bullet in your head. I know from my experience as a recruiter, you kind of do the same thing over and over again. One of the reasons I do this podcasts is to keep myself fresh because, all day long, I am staring at resumes, I'm talking with people, I am doing business development to open up new accounts, I am responding to customer inquiries,, negotiating salaries and people… All the same tasks.

What I set out to do is to create a little bit of freshness. So I started to write books, do videos, do podcasts, do a whole host of things to make my work more interesting to me Because the job of recruiter is extremely repetitive.

Do you want to be in a position where you are doing the same job for 40 years? No change whatsoever? I don't think so.

So, asked him about career pathing. Asked him about where you can go a few years from now. No guarantees, obviously. But what is the pattern of rotating people into newer opportunities.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Strategic Job Change and Career Planning | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011). PLEASE DISREGARD ANY JOBS REFERRED TO LATER IN THE AUDIO. I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING AND THESE POSITIONS WERE FILLED YEARS AGO.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Radio: Owning vs. Renting Your Career


Once upon a time boys and girls, a person went to work right out of high school confident that they would be able to work for an employer until retirement, Fat chance of that happening now!

On this show, I speak with Kevin Kermes of All Things Career about constructive ways to look at your career. Rather than allowing yourself to get “stuck” doing work you don’t enjoy, Kevin offers a formula to help you think holistically about your career and come up with an answer for yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Owning vs. Renting Your Career | Job Search Radio


Once upon a time boys and girls, a person went to work right out of high school confident that they would be able to work for an employer until retirement; fat chance of that happening now!

On this show, I speak with Kevin Kermes of All Things Career about constructive ways to look at your career. Rather than allowing yourself to get “stuck” doing work you don’t enjoy, Kevin offers a formula to help you think holistically about your career and come up with an answer for yourself.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

9 Things to Do to Avoid Career Disaster (VIDEO)

Here are things you can do to avoid career disasters.

Summary

Although the US economy is chugging along fueled by low interest rates that have punished savers, the world as a whole is struggling. Whereas in 2008, the US was hemorrhaging jobs, there has been mediocre but consistent job creation occurring. It is nowhere near pre-collapse levels but nonetheless jobs are being created.

Where once job boards were the primary way that people were looking for work, now positioning on LinkedIn is as important if not more so, as well as quality of your professional network.

As one of my guests said in an interview for “Job Search Radio,” 70% of all jobs are found through networking and 70% of those (or 49% of all jobs) are found based upon a relationship that didn’t exist at the beginning of your job search.

When I released my first book, “Get Yourself Hired NOW!” in 2006, branding was an alien concept to job hunters (and to some of you it may still be one) but it is incredibly easy to do given the technology tools that are now available that didn’t exist 10 years ago.

One thing remains true today as it did in 2006. If you’re like most people, you think job hunting is hard, something about as pleasant as going to the dentist or a visit from the Internal Revenue Service. But if I told you that you could earn at least $50,000 or more than you do now over the next five years, would I get your attention (Statistically, it would be easier to earn more than $70000 following a simple strategy)?

In 1972, when I was looking for my first job, I applied for a position at an employment agency. I almost didn’t apply because the ad said, “Management Trainee: Inexperienced Preferred.” In fact, I had no experience and thus was not qualified for anything else. On that day, I stumbled into the field of job hunting and have spent the subsequent years learning how the job hunting system works . . . and doesn’t work.

Since April of 1972, I have spoken to hundreds of thousands of people that I was able to document (more likely, much more), learning from their experiences, successes, and mistakes, and have successfully coached people to use these different strategies to find their next job.

After all, the next recession is on the way. Usually after blow out growth, 7 years is an extremely long period for a recovery. We have passed that threshold and are living on borrowed time.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Here are several things to do in anticipation of a need or desire to look for work.

Write a resume update. When a good opportunity presents itself to you, you can’t wait a week to update yours and then send it to the search firm. By then, they will have gone on to other potential submissions and lock you out of the competition. Every 3-4 months update it. Write a paragraph reviewing your accomplishments during that period. In this way, updating your resume will take no more than 90 minutes instead of scratching your head to remember things.
Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. Resumes are for when you are hunting for an opportunity. LinkedIn is for when you are being hunted. The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. People who get ahead are the ones who remain alert to opportunity.
Cultivate your network. Networking is the most effective way of job hunting. As I said, 49% of positions are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search and 70% all told are filled through networking, out positioning by more than 2-1 to job boards and recruiters. A network, whether in-person or online is cultivated through regular care and feeding. Start reaching out to people you know at least twice a year.
Build a “success brand.” The ability to brand is probably the biggest change that has occurred since I released my first book. There are more places to speak and write to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to audiences locally and worldwide. They require very little time and have a huge potential return.
Read the tea leaves. Every day, there is another story about workers being laid off from major and small companies throughout the world. It is stunning to me that so many of these people were surprised by job cuts. Didn’t they notice no one walking in their store, buying their employer’s products or services or were they just “wishing and hoping” that it might not happen to them?
Practice interviewing regularly. No matter how experienced someone is, interviewing is an acquired skill. The most senior people in the world make stupid mistakes on their interviews saying dumb things that prove costly. Don’t be an amateur. Practice proactively.
Make sure your wardrobe is appropriate for the position you are interviewing for and fits properly. Although this may be a bigger issue with men, both men and women arrive at interviews wearing clothes that are ill-fitting and 2-3 generations old in style, even when wearing “classic styles.” Even the classics go out of style. Even the classics don’t fit properly when you gain weight and stop doing any exercise.
Look out for yourself. Trust me. Your employer really doesn’t care if you live or die. You are hired to be “a team player.” In fact, you are disposable. One of the most accurate statements of this is in the comedy movie, “Back to School.” The last line of the movie is said by Rodney Dangerfield playing the part of the obnoxious but lovable millionaire, Thornton Mellon. He says, “It’s a jungle out there! You gotta look out for number one! Just don’t step in number 2!”
Hire a coach to help you. A relationship with a coach with whom you can sort things out, can help you succeed professionally. Great athletes and entertainers have coaches that bring out their talents and help them succeed. Why do you think you don’t need one? Don’t be a fool and think you have all the answers. Many of you don’t even have the right questions, let alone the right answers.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Most Successful Career Strategy (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an attitude that you need to employ in order to be successful in your career.

 

Summary

I wanted to speak with you today about the most successful career strategy that you can employ.

Most job hunters, most professionals, most employees of companies joining like sheepdogs. You come to work at companies, you have that happy glow and feel good about the opportunity. You are dedicated and committed to the organization. You give it your all!

Here is one problem. I'm going to use an analogy from dating. What you have done is fall in love too soon. As a matter of fact you have fallen in love which isn't the best strategy to take with an employer because they are dispassionate. As much as your manager may tell you that you are fabulous and wonderful, it is a placebo that corporations get out that cost them nothing and causes you to feel good about yourself.

The reality is that when times get tough, you are gone or at risk of being gone, no matter how great a job you have done. This is true whether you're at the staff level or at a leadership level. The risk that you experience is enormous.

You have to look at your career as a consultant would. After all, it's not like you going to be able to go to work there when you're 20 and stay there until retirement age, right? You know that already! The days of the gold watch are gone.

It doesn't matter whether you are on private sector or government. With the new president, government workers feel at risk because he is spoken frequently about spending for government employees. Whether they are fighting back or not, they feel threatened. Thus, they feel at risk for whether their job is safe.

Private sector workers have gone through cycles of that. Certainly, in 2008 and before that in 2001, private sector workers got obliterated before they eventually came back and started working again.

If you are thinking of a career strategy, the issue comes down to what you give your power away to someone who doesn't really care and who only looks out for their interest of times get a little bit difficult? No! It makes no sense to do that! It's like being in a relationship, going out on one date and saying, "I love you.!" The other person then say it's with some amount of exasperation, "Okay. Okay. Umm. I have strong feelings for you, to." They are not as committed or is engaged as you are. An employer wants to see that level of commitment as part of the hiring process and you have to presented in a way that is believable.

Interviewing is theater. This is part of the theater, you have to use; you can't fall prey to their desire to get you emotionally engaged when they are only going to come back and hurt you later on.

Instead, think as a consultant would. I have a job to do. I'm going to do a great job. I'm going to get paid fairly for it. At the end of that work. If you have more than I'm going to find interesting and will pay me well for, fabulous! I love that! If you want to give me a promotion, TERRIFIC! I will make more money – – SUPER! I need to see work that makes sense for me and my objectives.

It's like I've said in another video, is like being the chairman of the board of your own Corporation. Your family, your wife, husband, partner, kids – – they are the shareholders, but you are in charge. In taking that kind of approach, you have a degree of detachment and objectivity about the treatment that you received from your manager and coworkers and from your employer.

You look at the work that you're doing with objective eyes. After all, they may say, "We have this very important project and you're going to be on it for the next 2 years. It's really important to us. We know it's not real interesting and your mind will turn to mush, but we need you to do it."

At the end of 2 years, you are at risk of being thrown out because they don't need you anymore. Often, these kind of special projects are particularly marketable to anyone other than your current employer. Your career has been destroyed all because you said yes to something you shouldn't have said yes to.

Again, my advice is to act like a consultant and be the chairman of your business. Look at things with critical eyes and decide whether it makes sense for you and your career. Don't give away your heart. Don't give away your power. Don't give away your ability to say, "No" and take on things that make no sense and put your career at risk.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Abdication Isn’t Just Done By Royalty (VIDEO)


Too often, professionals abdicate responsibility for their careers just like royalty does with their crown.

abdication

Summary

The term, “abdication,” is an interesting one.  I know I tend to think of it in the context of royalty– a king or queen abdicating the crown, removing it from their head and surrendering authority for the realm.  Other people abdicate as well.  Let me offer a few illustrations.

The 1st 1 comes from my work in headhunting.  As you know I did for many years before becoming a coach.  There was a firm I done a lot of work with filled a lot of positions with that came to me and said that they wanted to reduce my fee by 20%.  I pause for a moment as we were speaking over the phone and nodded my head and said, “When you go to the store and pick up a package of steak and it says $20 on it and then you offer $15 or $16 for it, what did they tell you to do?

The answer is that they won’t sell it to you and tell you to put it back.  I charge the price that I am going to charge him is up to you to decide whether or not you are willing to pay it.  If you don’t, that is perfectly fine. You can purchase from someone else but this is what I’m going to charge.”

Story number 2 involves people in their careers.

When was the last time you really did career planning for yourself?  When was the last time you sat down and said to yourself, “You know, this isn’t going the way I hoped.  I’m going to sit down and figure out where I want to take my career 5 years and how I’m going to get there.

Have you ever done that?  Most people never.  They go to a job and do the tasks that they been assigned to do.  They stop thinking about themselves and their needs, doing a great job for their employer so that mommy and daddy company will take care of them. How smart is that?  If you look at the last recession, it wasn’t too smart, was it?

And, we can expect another reces of course, not! S

I want you to start thinking for yourself ion because recessions always show up.  Do you think you’re going to be immune to layoffs because your good girl or good boy and did exactly what you are told? Of course, not.

I want you to put yourself into the equation, take responsibility for your career. Instead of abdicating it to someone else.  If you do abdicate, you put yourself and your family at risk.  Is that really all that smart?

If you are involved with job hunting or need advice with your search, visit JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and join there.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Career Planning for Your Next Big Move

For most people, the idea of following their passion is an exercise in futility. If you are young, you may not know what you are passionate about because you have been so conditioned to work for grades. If you are older, any notion of passion may have been “beaten out of you” by systems where you have been rewarded to “shut up and do what you’re told, or else.”

As a result, most people I have spoken with, whether in search or in coaching are checked out in one way or the other. They want to have an impact but have little idea of how to foster change in their organizations, let alone their lives.

The other issue I see too frequently as that people accept the commoditized work they are performing and, as a result, have become “ordinary” and “easily replaceable.” Little distinguishes them from the next person with the result being when management is deciding between people to advance or promote, they might as well throw a dart at a group of pictures

What can you do to get ahead? How can you plan to get catapult your career?

Continued

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2016

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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