Keeping Your Network Alive After You’ve Found a Job | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s important to keep your network active when you’re not looking for a job and how to do it.

Summary

Usually, when people talk with you about networking, is with the idea finding a new position. I also want talk with you about networking from the standpoint of what really advantages you and your career. There was a survey not long ago that said that 60% of chief financial officers saw that there networking value to them in their work from the standpoint of building their business, helping with the business growth of the organization. 10% of them spoke in terms of job hunting.

Notice that big disparity. In most of your life, in most of your career, it is about business growth. It is about helping yourself as a professional advance. As a matter fact, 1 of the best answers that I suggest people give to the question, "How do you use LinkedIn," is not the talk about job search, but about talking about having a ready supply of people to reach out to in order to help you in your career with being successful and getting input on problems that may crop up.

Once you have this network established, like any garden, it needs to be tended to. I suggest a couple of things.

First of all, keep you network growing. Do things to advance your network that could be something as simple as tagging articles and sharing them, posting new information, helping others. That's the idea of passing it on. It is the idea of helping others.

If your professional association, I know there is the temptation to be less involved with it once you are in your new job. However, the relationships that you build in the professional organization will go a long way toward helping you in your new career. Thus, it becomes really important for you to be out there networking all the time.

Lastly, and I know that is the tendency to slack off on this, keep your online presence up to date. Other folks have questions and they want advice. Be helpful. You never know when your relationship with someone is something that you are able to benefit from later on. And, from the good karma perspective, you're obviously doing a good deed by being helpful to others.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Keeping Your Network Alive After You’ve Found a Job | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/18/keeping-your-network-alive-after-youve-found-a-job/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s important to keep your network active when you’re not looking for a job and how to do it.

Summary

Usually, when people talk with you about networking, is with the idea finding a new position. I also want talk with you about networking from the standpoint of what really advantages you and your career. There was a survey not long ago that said that 60% of chief financial officers saw that there networking value to them in their work from the standpoint of building their business, helping with the business growth of the organization. 10% of them spoke in terms of job hunting.

Notice that big disparity. In most of your life, in most of your career, it is about business growth. It is about helping yourself as a professional advance. As a matter fact, 1 of the best answers that I suggest people give to the question, "How do you use LinkedIn," is not the talk about job search, but about talking about having a ready supply of people to reach out to in order to help you in your career with being successful and getting input on problems that may crop up.

Once you have this network established, like any garden, it needs to be tended to. I suggest a couple of things.

First of all, keep you network growing. Do things to advance your network that could be something as simple as tagging articles and sharing them, posting new information, helping others. That's the idea of passing it on. It is the idea of helping others.

If your professional association, I know there is the temptation to be less involved with it once you are in your new job. However, the relationships that you build in the professional organization will go a long way toward helping you in your new career. Thus, it becomes really important for you to be out there networking all the time.

Lastly, and I know that is the tendency to slack off on this, keep your online presence up to date. Other folks have questions and they want advice. Be helpful. You never know when your relationship with someone is something that you are able to benefit from later on. And, from the good karma perspective, you're obviously doing a good deed by being helpful to others.All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Who Should You Network With to Find a Job? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

It’s Easier to Network Than You Think!

As most of us get older, we find it harder to get out of our comfort zone and do new things. We stop learning and growing. We stop developing ourselves and our soft skills like networking, preferring instead the comfort of complaining and blaming rather than the discomfort of trying something new.

Even in adult education, the problem shows up. As Seth Godin points out, in courses that he has developed for different platforms, his completion rate is among the highest . . . 20%! Why is the percentage in real terms so low? He believes that in situations where people run into something hard for them and there is insufficient internal or external pressure, people will go off and eat M&M’s instead of doing the hard work (personally, I prefer ice cream).

Networking falls into that category. I’m not talking about connecting with people on LinkedIn. That’s the easy part of the process. It is the real connection with someone where you build or maintain a relationship, particularly in person, that is so incredibly difficult. The excuse of time enters the picture. (I don’t have time to network. I have (work, family, friends, faith obligations). I just can’t do it!

Of course you have time. You have time to go somewhere once a month to a networking meeting, a professional group, a faith based group where you connect with people . . . wherever and treat it like an insurance policy.

An insurance policy?

Yes, insurance. the statistics on the importance of networking in career development and job hunting are clear.  In an interview I did for “Job Search Radio,” the show with the second most episodes about job hunting of any podcast (my other show, “No BS Job Search Advice Radio” is the #1 show), my guest pointed out that 70% of positions are filled as a result of networking. This statistic has been known for quite a long time. However, 70% of the 70% (49%) are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search. Almost 50%! 

So let me coach you here since your discomfort about being in new situations has been stronger than what you know you should be doing. It is easier to network than you think.

Here are a few things you can do.

  1. Find a meeting. Meetups. Business groups. Attending your church, synagogues, mosque, meditation center . . . there are many places to network. If these aren’t enough, use Google, LinkedIn and other platforms to find a meeting. It's Easier to Network Than You Think!
  2. The next thing is NOT to arrive last minute unless you are looking for an excuse to fail. It is also NOT to run out the door. The times to network are before and after. Arriving late or running out the door is a blown opportunity and is a trick people use to rationalize whey networking does’t work. It works. You just aren’t playing by the rules of networking.
  3. Pretend there is no wall for you to stand next to. If you have trouble imagining that, recognize that it doesn’t need your help to stand there, nor do you. Look for a person or two who are talking and smiling and head for them. They know one another and probably have been there before. Walk over  and ease into the conversation. “I have the idea that you have been here before. How long have you been involved with the group (attending)?” You can also ask the people at the sign in desk for advice as to who you should get to know.
  4. Smile and soften your gaze to appear friendly. It is harder to connect with someone if you look intense, angry, distracted from your day, It's Easier to Network Than You Think!etc.. Keep smiling as you speak and listening. Listen for something that 
  5. Exchange business cards or contact information from the people you speak with to stay in contact. Thank them by email, text or another age appropriate medium for making your first meeting easier for you as a first timer. Continue the conversation. I don’t care how you do it but just that you do it.

Networking is pivotal for all of us but, like so many things, we only pay attention to how to do it when we have a real and pressing need. Acting that way is childish and foolish. We know better and ignore what we need like losing weight and eating right. Doing this is easy and will take less effort than losing weight, eating properly and doing high quality exercise. 

It’s time to do it.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017        

 

For more advice to help you with your search, read, “The #1 Lie Employers and Recruiters Tell.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me atJeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

 

 

Who Should You Network With to Find a Job? (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Who Should You Network With to Find a Job?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Executive Networking Mistake #1 (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the biggest mistake executives and others make when networking.

Summary

Have you ever gotten 1 of those emails that says, "Hey! How are you? How's it going?" The next line basically translates into I'm looking for a new job. Can you help me?

You just want to hit the delete key because you haven't heard from this person for the longest time and suddenly, they are sending a message to you, like they are your long lost cousin and they need $20,000 from you.

You hate those emails yet so many of you operate that way of doing networking. You see, the biggest skill that you can develop professionally (other than the core job skills that you have) is maintaining your network. That's because at the end of the day, there is going to come a point where you going to need them. You may want to hire someone that they know or you may need help finding another position. Not nurturing your network is a huge mistake that way too many of you people make.

I don't care if you are in the C suite, the have a corporation, or the most senior person that firm. You as an individual have to cultivate and nurture a network of contacts because, one day, you don't want to be in the position of lurching to someone and say, "Hey! How are you?? How's it going? It was going real well for me until…" And then having to ask for a favor.

How many favors like that you grant? Most people I know don't grant many of them… If any of them.

Nurture your network during the time that you don't need so that they are available during the times when you do need them.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
 
Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Leaving a Message? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an important tactic for leaving a message when you are networking.

Summary

If you are out there trying to find work, you're probably out there trying to network with people. How are you doing it? Your emailing. Hopefully, you are also calling not just simply hiding behind email and expecting that to do all the work for you. The hopefully not hiding behind LinkedIn and not just simply sending inMails to folks. Instead, if you are going to be calling someone, I want you to think about the message that you are to leave for them proactively.

I had a few calls recently were people left messages that were absolutely awful. It was clear that they were thinking of what to say on the spot and, as a result, 1 of them did leave a phone number, another one forgot to give me any way to get a hold of them... It's ridiculous.Just be clear about what you want to say when you call someone.

If you are networking, simply say, " I wanted to reconnect with you. It is been a long time. Please give me a call back at ..." In very simple ways, leave messages that are clear about what you are trying to accomplish AND MAKE SURE THAT YOU TELL THEM HOW TO REACH YOU!

By the way, follow-up with an email just because folks are busy, the more likely to get the email if they are in meetings and act on it quickly . Then they might with a phone call. Leave a voicemail but follow-up with an email.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

How to End a Networking Conversation

How to End a Networking Conversation | Job Search Radio

Sometimes you’re at a networking event and you find it is time to end your conversation. Here are a few ways to do it.

Summary

There comes a point in your chitchat where it's time to make the break. That you could blithely blab on, but, isn't it more effective to end the conversation when you know it's really over? There's a few ways that you can do it.

1st of all, you can say something to the effect of, "Hey! Can I introduce you to someone?" Then you introduce them to someone else in the room who spent some time with or who you happen to know.

In another situation, you might basically say, "Hey, I'm just to get another drink. Would you like something?" Then, when you come back with your drink, (or they can obviously say no) if they say, "No," you can respond by saying, "Good talking with you. I hope to see you around." If they would like something and bring it back to you, you can say, "While I was on line, I ran into someone excuse me, I need to chat with them."

The 3rd thing you can say is, "Can we exchange cards so that we can stay in touch." Normally, the card exchange is going to signal that you want to stay in touch and that's really the time to end.

There is 1 More Way that I think is the most blunt overt way of doing it. You say something along the lines of, "I have to use the restroom. I'm sure will have a chance to talk on another occasion. Have a great evening." They go off to the restroom.

There's a few different ways to in the conversation.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

The Basic Principles of Networking | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses two basic principles of networking that you must follow.

Summary

I have advice for you today about the importance of networking.  For many of you, you are doing it all wrong.  To you network is being online.  You are on LinkedIn. You're making connections with people.  You are doing a whole bunch of stuff.  But you're not really talking to anyone.

Yes, it is important to influence people with how you communicate.  You are absolutely right.  There is a difference, however, when you are talking with someone for real, with meeting with someone for real and doing online networking.

I want to encourage you to get out of the house, get out of your office, and start scheduling regular sessions where you start meeting with people.

There was a suggestion made some years ago to have lunch with someone every day. That was a networking strategy.  I want to encourage you to talk with someone every day about some professional circumstance where you are creating an influence, or you are creating your brand/an image in people's minds. Help them.  Chat with them.  See where they can use advice and counsel.. Doing things like that where you are actually sitting in talking with someone, as opposed to emailing or texting will go a long way toward creating the sort of influence is going to help you with getting an introduction at a time that you will need it.

Again, as I said in a recent video, the next recession is coming.  I don't know when it is coming but there is another recession that is going to be coming.  I have my opinions about when that is going to be, but it is irrelevant. If I am right or wrong.  Ultimately another recession is going to come.  You want to be in a position where people know you, like you and trust you.  And want to help you.  They understand what you do and they know you like you, trust you and want to help you.  

Get out and talk to people.

Help.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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