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Make a Decision!


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages firms to either make a decision and explains why this is important.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Skilled labor

No B.S. Hiring Advice: Hiring Skilled Junior Staff

 

FROM THE ARCHIVES
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter paints a picture of why it may be difficult for you to locate experienced junior skilled talent.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Pick Up the Pace

Pick Up The Pace (VIDEO)


Take it or leave it. Too many firms are still operating with this recession era mentality and losing candidates to other firms.

On this show, I walk through some of the BLS numbers and point out some changes you need to make.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Hiring Someone? You and Your Team Don’t Know What You’re Doing.

Hiring Someone? You and Your Team Don’t Know What You’re Doing

When I worked in search, I filled more than 1200 positions plus consulting assignments. I interviewed clients about how they evaluated and assessed potential hires and did tens of thousands of post-interview debriefings with people who were interviewed. I also followed up with people who joined my clients to learn about disconnects between what they were told and what the reality was.

Here’s what we know.

Employee engagement rates are ridiculously low despite all of the effort that has gone into employee engagement. One statistic I saw indicated that half the workforce was actively disengaged with their work. The percentage of employees who were engaged with their work is Employee Engagementat 32% according to the most recent Gallup survey I found. That means that two thirds of the work force in the US is ambivalent or actively disengaged. And the US is the best in the world at this!

On the other hand, I have seen an interesting statistic about hiring managers and “buyer’s remorse.” Jeff Hyman from “The Strong Suit Podcast” and I discussed the fact that somewhere between 50% and 65% of hiring managers think they made a mistake hiring someone on their staff within the first year of the first year of a person joining (Jeff H stated it at 50%; I’ve seen it at 65%. You pick the percentage you want between those two percentages).

Why is hiring so broken?

Hiring is BrokenI think there are many reasons that when added together explain the problem. Starting off with

  1. Poor job descriptions. Job descriptions are pulled out of HR systems or copied from websites as the foundation for the approval process. That job description may be good enough to get an approval but may not be a clear depiction of what is needed to be qualified and succeed in the job. Thus, capable people screen themselves out of consideration because the job description doesn’t really accurately represent the job.
  2. Lack of clarity as to how to evaluate of skills competence. Have you ever been involved with an interview when your boss says, “I’ve got another 25 minutes on this call. Talk to them and tell me what you think.” Happens all the day. There’s one problem. The person covering may be told which job they are screening for (This is for Jerry’s replacement) but isn’t told what knowledge and experience their boss really wants.
  3. Everyone is putting on a good façade. We all know job hunters are selling themselves and their knowledge and presenting it in the best light We politely call that, “Exaggerating.” When we are impolitely, it is referred to as “lying.” We forget that hiring managers lie, too. No person being interviewed ever told me that, while on their interview, their future boss said to them, “You know, I just took over this position and the last three people who have held it were fired in the first 9 months. The last four people who interviewed for the job you are up? They quit within 120 days. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out that my butt is on the line and I need someone to help me save it!” No, they put on a happy smile button face and talk about how your predecessor quit for a better opportunity (Translation: Any opportunity would be better than this!) and that they want to hire someone exceptional, a team player (Translation: Someone who won’t question what I tell them and will be completely compliant) . . . Did I mention we’re like family? (Translation: Maybe a family like the ones we are shown in modern Thanksgiving and Christmas movies that want to remove one another’s lungs by sticky their hand down their throat). Yes, hiring managers (and recruiters) lie.
  4. They attempt to hire for fit. So we know job hunters are on good behavior and so are employers and their teams. How are you and the job hunter figuring out this person will fit? Have you administered profiling tests to your staff before you started interviewing? After all, they change and grow while working for you. You need to test them prior to hiring anyone in order to be accurate and not just rely on the test administered to them when they joined 4 years ago. You don’t do that? Oh! You’re trying to figure it out for yourself using little more than deciding that “I like them.”

 

Well, given that at best half of your hires engender buyer’s remorse, you could just save a lot of time and just flip a coin. After all, you have no training or expertise to do this. You are just “projecting qualities” onto this person based upon their “act” and deciding how they will fit in with your team or company.

And by being as phony as the job hunter, you and your team are hiring people who are ambivalent or actively dislike working for you and your company.

Here’s 5 things you can do.

  1. Get clear about what you are looking for. Stop being lazy about writing your job descriptions. Get clear about what people need to know and stop piling nonsensical criteria on top of your core requirements.Hiring Someone? You and Your Team Don’t Know What You’re Doing.
  2. Be clear about how you will evaluate and assess people. To avoid bias leaking into interviewing, create prearranged core questions everyone will be asked. Follow up questions make take you down a different road but the core questions have to be the same.
  3. Stop lying about the opportunity. The last person left because they were dead-ended. If statistics bear out, you won’t be there long enough to betray them because you are going to change jobs. Tell them that you want them there for 2 years. After that time, if they want to leave, you will open up your phone and start making calls to your network and help them get a more satisfying role. Until then, you want them “all in.”
  4. Stop hiring for fit. The numbers prove it. Employee engagement is terrible. Admit that you don’t know what you’re doing and just flip a coin.
  5. Tell people the truth about what they are stepping into. Tell them about the demands upon their time, emotions and health. Hide nothing. If they join, they knew what they were getting involved with.

 

HR organizations claim a science exists to employee engagement yet if this is science then I am Louis Pasteur (look him up). Employee engagement fails from the very first time an employee meets with your firm.

If you want a more effective model for evaluating people, read “It Starts With Courage.” 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017        

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search AdviceJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.  

What do Rockstars Really Want from their Employer? | Strong Suit Podcast

Why can’t companies seem to give the best talent what they’re seeking? And why do so many great candidates fail to impress employers?

Most importantly, why is there a 50% failure rate in new hires? That’s right … 1 out of 2 new hires bomb in their first year.

So, I went in search of answers. And I found Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter. For years, he was a top executive recruiter – helping companies fill their vacancies with Rockstars.

Then, Jeff switched sides. And began to coach executives on their career progression & leadership.

So he’s uniquely-qualified to diagnose the disconnect that exists top companies and top talent. Invest 20 minutes with Jeff – your company will thank you, and your personal career will thank you.

Summary

Announcer: Welcome to the strong school podcast where a growing company has to learn the right way to recruit rockstars. Each episode features one of the world's experts on recruiting the best talent to your company. Now here's your host and five time entrepreneur Jeff Hyman. Hello.

Jeff Hyman: Welcome to The Strong Suit podcast this is episode 155. And I'm your host Jeff Hyman every Tuesday and Thursday I interview a world class expert on talent and recruiting so you can build the companies filled with rock stars. Why is there such a disconnect between great companies and great people. When you think about it. Kind of weird right. I've been in this business a long time and there's some great candidates and they just can't seem to entice a really good company to take a shot with them. And then similarly there's a lot of great companies that can't attract the right talent. They've got tons of positions open.

Jeff Hyman: So this episode I really wanted to get at that disconnect and so I chased down this guy who knows it from both sides. His name is Jeff Altman. He's known as The Big Game Hunter and he's a rare person because he's been an executive recruiter for many years. A headhunter and worked with companies to fill their positions. But then he switched sides to become a career coach a leadership coach for individual executives so he's seen it for both from both perspectives and in this 20 minute interview we talk about this disconnect and really try to drill into where are the big mistakes that they make and then how do we fix it. If you're a company looking for great people how do you attract this great talent. He's been at this for 40 years in recruiting and then like I said career coaching. So you're going to get a ton of value with this interview with Jeff Altman in the next 20 minutes. Here we go. Ready. Aim Higher.

Jeff Hyman: OK Jeff has it going my friend.

Jeff Hyman: Fabulous. Thank you!

Jeff Hyman: It's a little confusing for the listener because we got two Jeff's but I think yours is low and husky mine is squeaky. I think we'll be fine. I'm really excited about this conversation for the next 15 20 minutes. I've

Jeff Hyman: been looking forward to it because I've been looking for someone who is an expert on the employer point of view in what is so broken about this recruiting process and why we have 50 percent failure rates or higher. And also is an expert on the candidates side and brings that point of view to the party.

Jeff Hyman: And you're the man, right?

Jeff Hyman: You betcha I am! I am so looking forward to beating up employers

Jeff Hyman: I would say you can beat up anyone you want on the next 15-20 minutes.

Jeff Hyman: But I'm really up I think we would both agree we were talking to pre-interview about how dysfunctional this thing is and it would be great if we can use your experience to understand why is it dysfunctional and then get into some of the big mistakes you see people make. Both candidates and companies and then we can get into how to fix it. Right. How do we have a chance what are the best practices. So I think we're going to a lot of fun. Let's start with just 60 seconds. Very high level. Give us your hypothesis or your thesis as to what is so broken and why is it so broken in finding the connection and the love match between the right job and the right person.

Jeff Hyman: I want to start by saying for the large institutional employer that's organized by systems that want to hire people that will fit into their square peg. And they themselves are square pegs a lot of the system is perfectly fine because they're looking for compliant individuals who the next time they will say will probably be the first time in the last five years.

Jeff Hyman: For our listeners who run and lead growth companies that probably where the boxes are still kind of morphing on the org chart, we need people that are leaders, are drivers, that are there are not maybe not so compliant right.

Jeff Hyman: For growth companies the system is completely wrong. And to me it starts off with the fact that you think that you can assess for fit and you're completely incapable of it. The proof of the matter is that all of you firms that hire and are so concerned about fit, as you said Jeff, the statistics are I've seen as high as 66 percent . . . but I'll take your 50 percent. Half of the hires within one year. The employer has buyer's remorse. Had they both words right and employers blame the employee but they never look in the mirror to see whether or not they have any culpability in this process. And I will tell you where it breaks down so simply. It breaks down because employers forget that everyone's on good behavior, right.

Jeff Hyman: In the interview, it is not representative of the real world.

Jeff Hyman: Forget the real world. They're on good behavior; they're trying to present themselves in a good light. They're being dishonest as an employer about what it's like to work there they want to get that person in the chair. And the candidate is as well.

Jeff Hyman: So it's like a first date where you really don't get to the 10th date before you see his or her flaws and problems and bad breath and what they look like in the morning and all that stuff. It's very analogous right.

Jeff Hyman: The entire job search process is like blind dating. Everyone's on good behavior, no one is going to present themselves honestly because they're afraid that if they do so, they'll be rejected.

Jeff Hyman: It's almost refreshing when you meet a candidate or an employer who tells you what works right. Early on. I mean you're like wow that person's being vulnerable actually you tend to believe them more.

Jeff Hyman: It's so true. And you know it's also true from the employer's side; it's true from the candidate side. The imperfections are really where the richness is and the candidate that is willing to take the risk of saying, " You know if you're willing to take a guy who is imperfect because somewhere along the line you're going to find out that I'm not the idyllic individual that you hope I am and I'm going to make mistakes. And my hope is at the end of the day you're not going to blame me or fire me. I'm going to learn from this experience. I'm going to learn and grow. Was it Thomas Watson from IBM who talked about not firing someone who made a 30 million dollar mistake in the 1950s because he said, "Hey you've learned on my money. Why am I going to send him somewhere else."

Jeff Hyman: As long as he doesn't make the same mistake over and over again. You mentioned you can't you can't find and hire for fit. Which would imply you should focus on competencies and skills which we'll get to in a second. But isn't, just to play devil's advocate isn't culture fit so important?

Jeff Altman: Define culture fit for me. Whether they work whether they can function in a workaholic environment?

Jeff Hyman: Whether they can be successful whether they value the same things that other employees value and hold dear.

Jeff Altman: And when I think in terms of fit I'm not sure whether it would means for most employers. Even in a startup environment even in the firm that has passed startup phase you know they are still evolving and so the question is can they operate at the pace? Can they deliver the goods? Can they help you grow? Knowing full well, as Reid Hoffman said during a wonderful interview on his podcast. He said, "One of my favorite questions is 'What's the next job five years from now when you leave me. Where do you want to be? These people aren't going to be around for five years. You're lucky to have them for two years!

Jeff Altman: So we're still in the marriage model of hiring. We want them to . . .

Jeff Hyman: Once an employee-employer bond was broken years ago, your thesis is that now we're basically renting talent for a short period of time a year two years three years. And therefore the culture is less important because there not going to be around.

Jeff Altman: And the truth of the matter is neither is the employer. They are going to go somewhere else.

Jeff Hyman: That's a good point, too.

Jeff Altman: The realities are very different than the model that America has raised its people to believe in. As a result you have to start evolving. And the notion that you want to hire compliant docile people who will sit in the same seat for the next 20 years of their life and interview them. "So where do you see yourself in the next five years?" "Working somewhere else obviously."

Jeff Hyman: So then let's talk about well before we get to solutions and how to improve it is your premise that the it's the interview part of the recruiting process that is the most broken or is it a whole recruiting process where where is the key issue?

Jeff Altman: So let's go to the selection process -- the selection to interview process and that involves the resume, the LinkedIn profile, rather than the referral. So often once we go past road use the old time language Rolodex

Jeff Hyman: I wonder what a Rolodexes is?

Jeff Altman: Once you get past the Rolodex, people are kind of tapped out so they all have the same database called LinkedIn. So they're in there trolling, they are all pitching a job, putting on a happy smile button face about, We've got a terrific organization and a great corporate culture. Did I mention we're kind of like family?

Jeff Hyman: We have a ping pong table

Jeff Altman: Right we've got a ping pong table and we've got donuts!

Jeff Hyman: Free donuts!

Jeff Hyman: Who doesn't like donuts, Jeff? do you.

Jeff Altman: Well, no, I go to a different kinds of sugar but that's a different conversation.

Jeff Hyman: How do you get past all that noise?

Jeff Altman: You get past the noise, from the employer's perspective, by being the first to disonnect from it.

Jeff Hyman: What does it mean?

Jeff Altman: To me what it means, number one is when you evaluate and assess, understand that you don't know what you're doing when you're hiring for fit; you are lying to yourself and you're lying to the employee. Or potential employee You're looking for skills and where you can come together cooperatively for the next few years.

Jeff Hyman: We have an opportunity. We have a chance for you to be involved with this kind of a project and we're looking for someone with particular types of skills and successes. Where we're going to be three years from now . . . we have an idea. You may want to be in a different place and I respect that and I'll open up my phone and help introduce you know people that I know who have this kind of opportunity.

Jeff Hyman: Right.

Jeff Altman: So instead of the marriage model, it's the dating model.

Jeff Hyman: is your premise that companies, while they suck at assessing fit that they're better at assessing competencies and skills or that at that as well.

Jeff Altman: They can do well but where it breaks down is often hiring managers are not clear about what it is that they're looking for and, even worse, they are terrible at communicating to the staffer or staffers who are involved with the assessment process ecause often they wait too busy to do it what you know someone wants to talk with them or they have a call scheduled that particular time and they turn around and say hey could it be with me that they have therapy to cover with me and talk with them about such and such.

Jeff Altman: And that's as far as they are heard. Right.

Speaker 11: And the result once a day you get someone who just wants the top candidates off at the knees rather than coming up with a clear assessment criteria for how someone would be able to help them so that if you can the equivalent of the pixie for interviews where you said I want you to cover these five basic wage air drill down deep so we understand exactly what they know what they don't know. We don't expect perfection. We expect real good. The more that they tell us more that there are just the more I work on because if they aren't if they're strong enough to say I don't know on an interview but I'm sure that they're vulnerable and open to learn.

Jeff Hyman: Right.

Jeff Hyman: And they're smart enough to make it rather than trying to lie to you.

Jeff Hyman: What percent of candidates you work with the shell of candidates what percent of candidates.

Speaker 12: R R R I don't know.

Jeff Hyman: I'm mostly intelligent enough to have those characteristics.

Speaker 13: The system isn't really set up for them to demonstrate to take it out of the job search process and certainly have more open more honest individuals in the candidate's job hunters you the successful individuals. If I hated dealing with this model of the job hunters are looking the passive candidate I have to correlate them with many years ago whether it is a myth. The myth is that the passive job hunter is a superior candidate the the active job.

Jeff Hyman: Everyone has a book. So why did you create Akhmed. And why is that persistent.

Jeff Hyman: Well back in the Stone Age has been restored in recruiting I didn't have the budget for amortizing the newspapers. So I had to create a methodology or a mythology that would justify the fact that I was not delivering the same volume as others were just running an ad in the New York Times so the notion became that you know I find the best person for you not just the best one who reads the Sunday Times and it becomes translated to today as being you know the passive job hunter is superior to the not in the service or seem to think so.

Speaker 13: When I interviewed someone who is out of work they look at me like I'm nuts some out of work you know sometimes in the 2008 2010 everyone was out of work. So why were they defective. You are right there with them. And firms were imploding but they blame the train wreck and punish them some more but you know these days if someone is lucky found their resume in some way shape or form suddenly they're less appropriate than if you get a job and we're all linked in a second person. But the sourcing place is different. And suddenly you have on the one hand I would want to talk to him on the. You are fruiterer's All right. Right. And two different recruiters are doing the same page. So why is this person not good at this what it is.

Jeff Hyman: So let's flip it on its head. Why. What do candidates make of this whole thing. All right you worked with many executive level candidates. They must be frustrated beyond belief which in turn you'd say as an employer who cares. You should care. Because if employers and employees and candidates are frustrated you've got a problem.

Jeff Altman: And the way it impacts employers is that they have a workforce that's resigned. And by that I mean they accept the fact that no one really wants them to excel isn't it.

Jeff Altman: And if we look at it and I'm sure you've examined different ways it's hard to get that person to be bold bold is not the quality that organizations really hire and very often unfortunate what like seeing jobs get a job these days. Larry I've listened for more than a week forgetting about whether he'd walk out the door. That's a different conversation. But clearly he is a 24 year old.

Jeff Altman: I've got the job decline and just I'm clear Jeff you're saying that he is he's a bit of an odd duck and companies are looking for what they are looking for people who continue to live in the box that the school system is in the United States and elsewhere have conditioned people to want to live.

Speaker 13: Because we get sick about it from the time we arrive in the school system in most schools there are exceptions but in most school systems the basic lesson of school is the factory model shut it up fit it in and then regurgitate a bunch of stuff. Do we tell you to do what we tell you to do it or else. We're not going to get into college.

Speaker 14: OK so in the five minutes remaining let's turn to solutions because if I'm the kind of leader that wants to attract Steve Jobs it's creative difficult sometimes. Geniuses who think out of the box and really propel my business what I have to do differently. Do you see any employers that can do it.

Jeff Altman: I don't want to identify firms partly because they can't do it every firm can do but requires a top down in college not because number one is people are going to make mistakes. And unfortunately one of the things that we have drilled into us is this accountability model that basically says if you screw up we are going to punish you're not talking about embezzling money.

Jeff Altman: Legal ethical breaches right. This decision lapse but I made a mistake.

Jeff Altman: I missed this point so I don't think it was you can do a post mortem with and said Where pray pretend. Let's go through this. Let's you know evaluate it.

Jeff Hyman: Is actually what you're saying Jeff is that's a commitment to hiring managers even at the mid level who are exceptional and focused on learning and teaching and growing people as opposed to functional experts right.

Jeff Hyman: Promoting the sales rep who had the best numbers or promoting this software developer who wrote the best code into a manager role and his managers.

Speaker 13: They suck as managers and even they can learn. The question becomes if they don't want to learn they shouldnt be managers create systems that reward them. The guy is a guy that I coach he heads up sales for medical device from somewhere. A good performer of his wound up giving notice he didn't want to lose the car suddenly he has to become a manager so get the compensation increase and he isn't really mentally capable of this for what he is is a good sales guy who can afford to lose at the time.

Jeff Hyman: So what defines then because the stench from the head down. What defines the CEO or or functional leader. You know people sales people marketing Sahra who can create that kind of environment that attracts rock stars that can do their best work. What characteristics do those leaders have that most leaders. Sounds like you would argue dont have.

Speaker 13: What are they what sets us apart. I think number one is the freedom to express themselves in this kind of way. So again institutions whether it's a bank or a start startup tend to think in terms of great things. Right. You are afraid of having things fail because of the impact of failure. Forget that on the Enterprise because then the prices can recover start up. Its a different story than you're saying.

Jeff Hyman: And Amazon a cell phone ad bombs.

Jeff Altman: Whatever. And hopefully that person isn't taken back and had a bullet put in they should be promoted if they tried something right out.

Jeff Hyman: So the question is let's deconstructed Let's learn from this experience. Where did this what could we have done differently earlier are going to make this a win rather than a round of big. Maybe it's not a committee maybe it's the skunkworks in a different building that doesn't have to report to management all the time until they have to actually prototype for whatever it is. The

Jeff Altman: idea is to train and retain people as long as you want them who can really thrive in organization because you've given them freedom. Shammi what's hard. I mean they say it's a semi autonomy. Because ultimately you have to write checks.

Jeff Hyman: Sure. Right. Yes. So. So in the in the two minutes remaining let's make this really actionable.

Speaker 14: What is the first step to making this change so let's say I work at a company I'm CEO or a VIP whatever and for whatever reason my own failings are just the way it's played out. Our company is now this way. Right. It's more risk averse. It's more the type of mentality that punishes mistakes etc..

Jeff Hyman: How do we start. What is the first step to get on that path the sudden overnight transition but how do we begin to make that change so that I attract these rock stars who want to do big things.

Speaker 15: The simplest way is to go or were hiring manager the one who has the greatest turnover and basically sit with him or her and say to them you know something's not working and what you're doing. Right. So let's try something a little bit different. What good invites you to do is take personality out of the equation instead of throwing effect the darts up against the bar a dart board to see whether or not by some miracle you hire the perfect fit. I think in terms of bringing people with qualifications carry it become clearer about what you're looking for. Not only bad job distractions because most job descriptions are such that even if they're somewhat really all made over something that someone's pulled out of there's just so much to get her to told them that they need to get her approval will they grab it from some web site or copy from some other company.

Jeff Altman: Right. And they share it with their internal external recruiting sources without communicating where their job is different how it is or not. And I'm always believer that you want people to be forthright every step along the way and tell these folks look you probably make mistakes you're making mistakes before. Let's try something a little bit different. Your first gifts are reminder to folks is one of the ways we complain about politicians about our presidents is they only have people who say yes to the young people to hire people who will disagree with us and get that kind of input instead of hiring them to the employer on getting me to tell people that you want to hire the team players is required.

Speaker 15: I want them to stop thinking around compliance and there are some jobs that require compliance or most don't.

Speaker 14: But that also means you said sit down with the worst hiring manager if if that's what he or she is looking for because they lack the confidence for employees on their team to challenge them to disagree or that manager has to go right is that's not a changeable fungible.

Jeff Altman: You can try it with them for six months see whether how they respond to this will go back to the old model do with the more honorable some of the offenders and then give them the option to go because my belief is most people if they if they're not willing to play ball with you when you're giving them this amount of freedom they don't believe that they have this freedom.

Speaker 13: Right. Right. So yeah it does give them permission to give them permission to make mistakes. One

Jeff Hyman: fisherman I'm glad to get that permission and they still don't do it then you get from you me. You need to make a change. Jack it's been phenomenal. How can people learn more about you or get tougher.

Speaker 16: You know I coach people in organizations that want to be effective and successful. Send me an e-mail. Jeff Lunden has the big game hunter got us. Tell me what it took on the subject line. Give me a story. My web site is the big game$100 US. I love that. Awesome awesome. I love it.

Jeff Hyman: Thank you for making the time we really appreciate it. You're

Jeff Altman: welcome. Have a great difference.

Announcer: That's all for this episode of the strong student podcast. The next step is to head the strong suit dot where you can join our very live Web and our your proven method for recruiting rock stars to your company. If you like what you heard today be sure to subscribe to the podcast and write us a five star review on iTunes. This is the strong super podcast where we show you how to recruit rock stars.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

5 questions to ask at any interview

5 Questions (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests that you develop five questions that are asked on every interview with your firm.

Summary

This is a simple philosophical approach to interviewing vice think should permeate most organizations.

The simple suggestion I want to make is, there should be 5 questions that are asked on every interview. I'm not talking about for example, objective questions about accounting, if you are interviewing an accountant. I'm not talking about programming questions. I'm talking about core philosophical questions that should be as fun every interview.

I understand that this is easier to implement in a smaller firm where there might be face-to-face conversations between participants of the firm. It can certainly be developed in midsized organizations because 1 of the things that can come from this is that you can track the top characteristics of high performance the organization of the course of time based upon how they answer these questions.

Think in terms of what are the core values of your firm and how you would want to assess someone for those core values. I don't care what type of organization it is, all of you represent firms that have core values. All of you have organizations within those firms that have core values. Find what those common elements are and then ask questions that will help you to deduce whether someone might be a cultural fit for your organization. Then, what someone is on board, track have someone actually measured up with some of your bigger successes.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

The Best Tools for Evaluating Potential Hires (VIDEO)


Everyone was in magic solution that prevents new hires from failing and people getting tired easily and quickly. There is no “miracle solution.”

Summary

Someone asked me a question about the best tools for hiring. People keep looking for the solution that will cause people to walk at the door, be evaluated and hired with no problem whatsoever.

Sorry folks, it doesn't exist.

People are selling you panaceas and you are getting a placebo.

Here's the reality to it. The biggest mistake that most of you make isn't with your applicant tracking system. It is relevant to the equation. It isn't with how you screen resumes. It is really irrelevant. The biggest thing you need to do is come up with standardized questions instead of going off ad hoc when you interview people.

Here's the problem. You're the hiring manager and someone is coming in to meet with you. You ask someone, "I've got someone here to speak with me. Would you talk with them and tell me what you think?"

"Which position is this for?" Okay, they know the job that this is for.

Okay, they know the job that this is for, but don't know what to evaluate them for.

Come up with questions. Come up with Q&A. Get predictable. Get the bias out of the situation.

You see, for a lot of organizations, bias rears its ugly head at this point. Suddenly, the person with poor oral communications or average oral communications gets turned down because they did not give the "splendid, wonderful answer." that your 3 year person thought was exquisite when their skills and experience were adequate for the job. You are missing out on people who would be well-qualified, wasting a lot of time on nonsense and it is costing you dearly.

The best school you could have for hiring or screening people is really the standardized interview, instead of the ad hoc 1. You may went to make some of the conversation conversational You want people to have a warm feeling. You don't want to necessarily start off with rigid questions. You want people to be asked the same questions so that this way, you have a reliable indicator of the person's experiences, rather than some people will ask this and others might ask that.

The last point I want to make-- STOP THINKING ABOUT FIT. You are completely incapable of evaluating for fit. I can prove it to you.

1. The statistics on employers remorse/buyers remorse for choosing a particular candidate, within one year of a new hire, almost 2/3 of employers wish they hadn't hired the person.
Come on folks. What does that tell you?

Here's another thing that shows up. Employers make mistakes. After all, everyone is on good behavior. You are in good behavior and so are they.

Everyone is on good behavior. . You're on good behavior. You are on good behavior… And so are they. How are you able to determine fit?

"They remind me of so-and-so. It is not like you are giving that an industrial psychology test" it is not like you are giving your existing staff industrial psychology tests. All you're doing is very simple. You are sitting there thinking, "Are they smart or not?"

Stop it! Just go for qualifications.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.  

What to Look for When Reviewing “At Risk” Employees


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

For many managers and business leaders, the first clue they think they are given is when they are asked if they have a minute on a Friday afternoon to given notice. That couldn’t be the furthest things from the truth.

Here’s the simplest thing to keep an eye out for.

Summary

This 1 came from an institutional customer of mine who asked for some advice about something. The advice is about recognizing the signals employees are sending about being "at risk." To me was an easy question before her was a bit different. I thought I would walk through stages of employment so that you could spot the evolution with your people.

Jimmy, there are a few stages beginning with the one where they joined and they are all sorts of gung ho and they are really into it and they are trying to prove that you made a great decision hiring them and that this is a great job. Then, they get into the rhythm of the office where they start to play to the level of everyone else. It is not an ideal set of circumstances. if you have average staff or mediocre because they start to adapt to them, rather than your existing staff adapt to the new hire.

It's like I heard said many times, environments tend to win. If you think about the language and offices, "Oh! He is a brown nose," what are they trying to communicate? He is trying to get on the boss's good side. As a result, he is not 1 of us. He is someone who is catering to the boss. Until that individual levels out on the same plane as everyone else, they are not seen favorably by their peers.

Then there is the phase where they have adjusted. That's because environments win and they have adapted to it. In doing so, there will be times where they are hitting your head against the wall because you are not communicating with them the same way as you used to. The result is that frustration starts to set in. That's what happens. That has been my experience and the experience of everyone I work with as a recruiter and now as a coach. Resignation starts to set in.

Then there is the phase where they just don't give a damn until they walk out the door.

If you see this is a few natural progressions, you need to look out for the "noticing the resignation" phase that they have leveled out to their existing staff, they have become 1 of them, and are not trying to rock the boat anymore. "Not rocking the boat" is the 1st signal.

Then they start bumping up against you in some way because they start parroting the staff about something, instead of thinking like you. Until they become so frustrated that they start to neglect stuff. Maybe they're going through the motions… minimally. However, at the end of the day, they are really putting on a good performance anymore. That's a real problem because the next step is that they start heading out the door.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. 

Two Questions to Ask if You Want to Hire Someone With Ambition? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here are 2 questions that you can ask in order to identify potential hires who are ambitious.

Summary

Money, power, recognition, status, variety, career.

Today I have a question for employers that is designed to identify people who are ambitious. Here are 2 questions you can ask in the course of the interview.

The 1st question comes from Reid Hoffman. It is apparently a question he uses and encouraged to be used at LinkedIn when they were interviewing staff. The question is, "What job do you want to have after this 1?" Interesting question, isn't it?

The assumption the question is that you're not going to stay here forever and the truth is, no one does, right? So let's not kid ourselves. What is this job going to be the steppingstone for? Is the elephant in the room for employers. They know you're not going to stay. They know you're not going to jointly work for the company for 40 years, right? Let's find out how ambitious someone is.

If you are beginner and start talking about becoming the Grand Poobah a C level professional, you can work with the assumption that there going to be there for a long time , but I don't think that I believe it and think your unrealistic. Again, I think it's a great question for identifying ambition.

Here's another one and I think you have to recognize the subtlety in it. I want you to rate these factors: happiness, Money, power, recognition, status, variety, career.
Happiness is a throwaway answer because everyone should want happiness.  The answer isn't necessarily in the answers themselves but in the follow-up.

When I would use this question, I would only be curious about happiness if it wasn't their 1st choice.  To me, not putting happiness. 1st was the quirky answer.  From there, money, power, recognition, status, variety and career… You want to ask questions . . . Why is this important to you?  It is in the follow-up that you learn.  There is no right answer to this.

So, for example,  if you are in the business for you want people more money motivated, you might want money is the 2nd choice But you have to ask the follow-up question.  What is a lot of money to you means different things to different people.  I  remember following up with one person with that question and learned that he would buy a used car and fix it up.  His definition of a lot of money and other people's definition of a lot of money were very different. Had I not asked that question I never would have known and would have wound up with what someone with low drive on the financial side. 

So, again, it's not important what the specific answer is until you start collecting data about who works in your organization and who works out well. That is going to take time. With time, you can find that help people with certain qualities work out for you. Again, It is a very simple question where all you have to do is hand them a sheet of paper, s pen and asked them to rate the 7 factors for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B011GK0ADE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Making Assumptions About Sexual Orientation

EP 825 I discuss a mistake many make, job hunters, corporate and third party recruiters make.

Summary

This is another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes I see people make all the time. It involves the habit of how we were acculturated in the US that comes into play that shows up in interviews where you make assumptions about "the other" that you can't make. There's so it goes.

You look across the table. There is a woman sitting there and you referred to her husband. Well, I'm gonna remind you of something. Same-sex marriage in the United States is legal. You now have to say something different. You now have to say something like, "husband, wife or partner. " If the role, she may be married to a man… She may be married to a woman she may have a partner. As a result, if you start saying things that assume that she is heterosexual, you are going to send up flags for the gay audience, and rightly so. You are denying the fact that they could be married.

Folks, I know some of you may be rolling your eyes and say things like, "Oh! Man!" Get over yourself! This is a fact. I'm going to say the from the job hunter perspective, you make the same mistake as employers do when you reference people as though they are heterosexual. You may see a man sitting opposite you; 35 years old. You notice a ring on their finger on the way in. You feel good that you notice that he's married... And then you refer to his wife... And maybe he is married to a woman. But maybe he isn't. In not referring to, "wife, husband or partner," I can assure you that he would hear an "ouch" that hits them in the gut. When it comes time to evaluate you to consider accepting your job offer, it weighs heavily. You can't help it. Nor would you want to.

People couldn't deny it does because they tend to be kind and say things like, "it takes time to change the habit." Saying, "wife, husband or partner," isn't necessarily going to get you "brownie points." But the fact is, you don't want to offend, right? That's true whether you are a third-party recruiter, a corporate recruiter or job hunter.

At the end of the day, same-sex marriage is legal. Get used to a different language because otherwise, you are going to hurt yourself somewhere along the line, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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