What to Look for When Reviewing “At Risk” Employees


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For many managers and business leaders, the first clue they think they are given is when they are asked if they have a minute on a Friday afternoon to given notice. That couldn’t be the furthest things from the truth.

Here’s the simplest thing to keep an eye out for.

Summary

This 1 came from an institutional customer of mine who asked for some advice about something. The advice is about recognizing the signals employees are sending about being "at risk." To me was an easy question before her was a bit different. I thought I would walk through stages of employment so that you could spot the evolution with your people.

Jimmy, there are a few stages beginning with the one where they joined and they are all sorts of gung ho and they are really into it and they are trying to prove that you made a great decision hiring them and that this is a great job. Then, they get into the rhythm of the office where they start to play to the level of everyone else. It is not an ideal set of circumstances. if you have average staff or mediocre because they start to adapt to them, rather than your existing staff adapt to the new hire.

It's like I heard said many times, environments tend to win. If you think about the language and offices, "Oh! He is a brown nose," what are they trying to communicate? He is trying to get on the boss's good side. As a result, he is not 1 of us. He is someone who is catering to the boss. Until that individual levels out on the same plane as everyone else, they are not seen favorably by their peers.

Then there is the phase where they have adjusted. That's because environments win and they have adapted to it. In doing so, there will be times where they are hitting your head against the wall because you are not communicating with them the same way as you used to. The result is that frustration starts to set in. That's what happens. That has been my experience and the experience of everyone I work with as a recruiter and now as a coach. Resignation starts to set in.

Then there is the phase where they just don't give a damn until they walk out the door.

If you see this is a few natural progressions, you need to look out for the "noticing the resignation" phase that they have leveled out to their existing staff, they have become 1 of them, and are not trying to rock the boat anymore. "Not rocking the boat" is the 1st signal.

Then they start bumping up against you in some way because they start parroting the staff about something, instead of thinking like you. Until they become so frustrated that they start to neglect stuff. Maybe they're going through the motions… minimally. However, at the end of the day, they are really putting on a good performance anymore. That's a real problem because the next step is that they start heading out the door.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. 

Two Questions to Ask if You Want to Hire Someone With Ambition? (VIDEO)


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Here are 2 questions that you can ask in order to identify potential hires who are ambitious.

Summary

Money, power, recognition, status, variety, career.

Today I have a question for employers that is designed to identify people who are ambitious. Here are 2 questions you can ask in the course of the interview.

The 1st question comes from Reid Hoffman. It is apparently a question he uses and encouraged to be used at LinkedIn when they were interviewing staff. The question is, "What job do you want to have after this 1?" Interesting question, isn't it?

The assumption the question is that you're not going to stay here forever and the truth is, no one does, right? So let's not kid ourselves. What is this job going to be the steppingstone for? Is the elephant in the room for employers. They know you're not going to stay. They know you're not going to jointly work for the company for 40 years, right? Let's find out how ambitious someone is.

If you are beginner and start talking about becoming the Grand Poobah a C level professional, you can work with the assumption that there going to be there for a long time , but I don't think that I believe it and think your unrealistic. Again, I think it's a great question for identifying ambition.

Here's another one and I think you have to recognize the subtlety in it. I want you to rate these factors: happiness, Money, power, recognition, status, variety, career.
Happiness is a throwaway answer because everyone should want happiness.  The answer isn't necessarily in the answers themselves but in the follow-up.

When I would use this question, I would only be curious about happiness if it wasn't their 1st choice.  To me, not putting happiness. 1st was the quirky answer.  From there, money, power, recognition, status, variety and career… You want to ask questions . . . Why is this important to you?  It is in the follow-up that you learn.  There is no right answer to this.

So, for example,  if you are in the business for you want people more money motivated, you might want money is the 2nd choice But you have to ask the follow-up question.  What is a lot of money to you means different things to different people.  I  remember following up with one person with that question and learned that he would buy a used car and fix it up.  His definition of a lot of money and other people's definition of a lot of money were very different. Had I not asked that question I never would have known and would have wound up with what someone with low drive on the financial side. 

So, again, it's not important what the specific answer is until you start collecting data about who works in your organization and who works out well. That is going to take time. With time, you can find that help people with certain qualities work out for you. Again, It is a very simple question where all you have to do is hand them a sheet of paper, s pen and asked them to rate the 7 factors for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B011GK0ADE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Making Assumptions About Sexual Orientation

EP 825 I discuss a mistake many make, job hunters, corporate and third party recruiters make.

Summary

This is another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes I see people make all the time. It involves the habit of how we were acculturated in the US that comes into play that shows up in interviews where you make assumptions about "the other" that you can't make. There's so it goes.

You look across the table. There is a woman sitting there and you referred to her husband. Well, I'm gonna remind you of something. Same-sex marriage in the United States is legal. You now have to say something different. You now have to say something like, "husband, wife or partner. " If the role, she may be married to a man… She may be married to a woman she may have a partner. As a result, if you start saying things that assume that she is heterosexual, you are going to send up flags for the gay audience, and rightly so. You are denying the fact that they could be married.

Folks, I know some of you may be rolling your eyes and say things like, "Oh! Man!" Get over yourself! This is a fact. I'm going to say the from the job hunter perspective, you make the same mistake as employers do when you reference people as though they are heterosexual. You may see a man sitting opposite you; 35 years old. You notice a ring on their finger on the way in. You feel good that you notice that he's married... And then you refer to his wife... And maybe he is married to a woman. But maybe he isn't. In not referring to, "wife, husband or partner," I can assure you that he would hear an "ouch" that hits them in the gut. When it comes time to evaluate you to consider accepting your job offer, it weighs heavily. You can't help it. Nor would you want to.

People couldn't deny it does because they tend to be kind and say things like, "it takes time to change the habit." Saying, "wife, husband or partner," isn't necessarily going to get you "brownie points." But the fact is, you don't want to offend, right? That's true whether you are a third-party recruiter, a corporate recruiter or job hunter.

At the end of the day, same-sex marriage is legal. Get used to a different language because otherwise, you are going to hurt yourself somewhere along the line, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Most Accurate Predictor of Employee Turnover


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Adam Grant’s book, “Originals” starts with a discussion of the most accurate predictor of employee turnover. It is probably not what you think.

Summary

I started reading Adam grants book, "Originals," and it starts over the very engaging story. It is a story about employee turnover in call centers. Grant says that in doing research for this, he was trying to figure out why turnover exists and what was possible to predict turnover and who the most likely people would be to turnover. They measured all sorts of statistics.

The classic HR theory is sort of like a mutual fund except they believe that past performance IS a predictor of future behaviors. The classic HR belief is that if this person has changed jobs a bunch of times in the past, they will change jobs a bunch of times in the future. However, in call centers and other places, Grant points out that the statistics did not warrant that conclusion.

Instead he found something very interesting. Believe it or not, what he found is that the browser used to upload the resume was the most accurate predictor of how soon a person might leave. Interesting! Browser type. Which browser was the most conclusive ones? Safari. Internet Explorer. People who use those browsers were more likely to turnover quickly than those who used the Chrome or Firefox.

Now I know some of you are going to say, "Well, what about the people who had the bad job histories?" Even with bad job histories, people who use the particular browser type more more (or less) likely to change jobs. As a matter of fact, he points out that with people that he was measuring, he found that people who had been job histories stayed longer if they happen to use Chrome or Firefox.

It begs the question, what is it about the browser type that results in people staying? What he concluded was that using a default browser (this is my choice of terms) is indicative of "lazy thinking." Default mode. People who use Chrome or Firefox have to consciously take action to improve their circumstances whereas the IE or Safari user doesn't.

He encourages you to think in terms that might be a little bit different than what you've done up until this point to think, not just in terms of a past behavior, but some other indicator to accurately determine whether this person will actually turn over. As he wrote, his statistics did not indicate any correlation between past behavior and future behavior. The correlation he found was browser type.

Where have you been misreading? Where have you been thinking that it is all about what they have done previously, making assumptions without using valid data.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Is It OK To Hide a Job on My Resume? (VIDEO)


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What do you think? I have my opinion.

Summary

A message from someone asked, "Is it okay to hide the job on my resume?"

There are so many different things I don't know here; I will just start by saying that if you are an employer and they find out, what is the impact on you? Answer… They fire you. Is it okay knowing that? You have to make the decision.

I also want to say that if we are discussing a job you have for 2 weeks, 15 years ago, no one cares. However, if what you are doing is changing your resume to hide something that (I'm picking something at random) one year 3 years ago and you are extending job dates and extending both dates in order to hide that one year that you don't want anyone to know about because you got a bad reference and were fired for cause, that's going to be a problem because they will find that one out. You see, employers to post employment background checks. Sometimes, they will do it before you join. And they will find out because they will contact your former employers directly and when a former employer hears an inconsistency in the date, they are going to out you. The firm that you have worked so hard to get the job with will probably withdraw the offer.

Again, if we are talking about something from 6 years ago, 10 years ago, 15 years ago and it is a very short duration, no one cares. However, if it is something more recent, would you care for was then and finding out that you are lying to? What other lies have they been told? That's the message they take from this.

Is it really okay to hide a job on your resume? No, it isn't okay. That's because if they find out, they will fire you. It doesn't matter how long you have been on board, that is going to happen. Just like those executives who, when they find out that they don't have the college degree that they claim, this is no different.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

A Free Tool to Expand Your Small LinkedIn Network

 

On this video, I discuss a free website, www.LI-USA.info, to help you identify people to recruit or network with in case you have a small LinkedIn network.

NOTE: I no longer do recruiting so that part is no longer relevant

Summary

This is a show about a free website so that if you are looking for people in the United States and don't have access to LinkedIn recruiter, and you want to expand your network, this is a perfect tool for you. It's a Google custom search engine that's designed to search the entire list of LinkedIn public profile is in the United States. It's completely free. There are no hidden costs. The only thing you need to know is the basics of Boolean search.

If you go to www.LI-USA.info and do a search, you will find the search box in the middle of the page. Nothing more. Nothing less.

What you do is enter the search terms just as you would in a Boolean search. You will also need to include how LinkedIn describes the geographic area that you are trying to find someone in.

Using the example of the New York area, If you are doing a search in New York, it might say,, "New York area." Whatever the LinkedIn term is for that particular area, put it in quotes. Hit enter and will return results from everyone who has a LinkedIn profile in the United States in that area.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Interviewing Is Broken

By Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Why Interviewing Is Broken

Congratulations. You have gotten through the funnel of the applicant tracking system. Maybe you have already made it past the recruiter screening. Maybe you have networked or been referred to the hiring manager. However, you have gotten there, you are now speaking with or meeting with hiring manager or talking with someone from the team who will be evaluating you. You have the skills they say they want. What can go wrong?

Oh! You want proof that something is wrong!

According to the Society for Human Resources Management, half of all hourly workers resign within the first four months of a new job, and half of senior hires crash within just 18 months. Hiring managers have a similar perspective of buyer’s remorse after a hire, reaching almost 60%.

  1. Everyone is on good behavior. We all know that job applicants are on good behavior but we forget that hiring managers are on Why Interviewing Is Brokengood behavior, too. I did recruiting for more than 40 years and never heard of a hiring manager ever say to a job hunter, “We have problems here. The last 4 people hired for your job quit. In addition, the last two people who sat in my seat were fired and it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that my butt is on the line and need to hire someone to help me save it from a similar fate.” Instead, companies put on these charades of happy smile button faces where they talk about “career opportunities,” and “a terrific team of people,” lots to learn . . . “Did I mention we’re like family here?” It mirrors the old saw from recruiting, “They all lie. Employers. Candidates. Recruiters.”
  2. 2. People try to screen beyond their abilities. When staff try interview for skills competence, hiring managers are rarely clear about what they want this person evaluated for. It is not enough to say, “interview them for Java skills,” or “Find out what they know about . . . .” Managers need to be specific with their teams about the very thing they want critiqued and how they want it screened for.” I remember people I represented being impressed or turned off by fringe questions that someone might need to know once every 18-24 months. Anyone ever hear about Google?
  3. Managers want people who “fit.” People have made it through the sausage maker of the applicant tracking system. You talk with them on the phone or in-person. You are on good behavior and so are they. How can you tell that someone fits? Tell me about your credentials to evaluate for fit. Tell me about how you have administered personality profiles to your existing staff before you began interviewing in order to assess how the new hire’s personality would mesh with theirs. Even when a potential hire is personality tested, the staff is never retested hence using old data to work with. People change from when you hired them to when you are interviewing for new people based upon the environment they work in and other factors in their lives. You never go back and check for that. Hence hiring managers are left to whim to assess for fit, rather than data. In doing so, bias creeps into the process. That bias can include educational bias (I like people with degrees from this school or who have particular degrees, rather than those who have online degrees from the same universities), class bias (they live where? They don’t have a degree or achieved it at night because their family could not afford a particular university), race or gender bias (need I say more about these), national origin (immigrants have it harder than people born in a nation, even though they may have the same knowledge). There are many more biases that show up including the bias of only hiring people who agree with us.
  4. Different constituencies in the organization may have different opinions as to what is needed. When I still did recruiting, I remember being asked by a midwestern firm to speak with an executive within the firm about a search they wanted me to do. I listened to the usual canned presentation, started to narrow them down and asked about the interview process and whether business units being served by this role would participate in the hire (they would). I asked, “Do they agree with the qualifications you’ve out lined to me?” Met by silence, I was soon told that they didn’t and had a very different view of the role. How do you hire someone when the participants disagree about what is needed? You enter into “The Land of Perpetual Interviewing.” Suffice it to say, I did not accept the search.
  5. People on the assessment team disagree about who the best hire is. A firm I recruited for ten years ago would fly people in for “meatgrinder” interviews. 4 hiring managers plus HR. 30 minutes per manager. Put them in a car. Fly them home. The managers would meet afterwards and decide who to hire. People disagreed forcefully about who to hire. Why? If everyone is clear about the criteria to be used, a person either has the knowledge and has already successfully engaged in the work to be done or not. It is very simple. But comments often included the ever popular, “too light,” “too strong” and “I’m not sure they would fit in.”

 

The result is that by the lowest measure imaginable, employee engagement (employees are engaged in their work), there is a 22% employee engagement rate in the US . . . and that is high by international standards.Why Interviewing Is Broken

In other words, you are either picking the wrong people for your jobs (and/or you are picking the wrong company to join) or employees are being turned off by your firm, their manager or their work.

Does that sound like good decisions are being made? Remember, almost 4 out of 5 employees are DISengaged.

Here’s what you can do instead.

  1. Give up the idea of their being “the perfect hire” or “the dream job.” Folks, we are human beings with foibles. We make mistakes, some of them pretty stupid mistakes. The country smokes, overeats and eats foods that are remarkably unhealthy. Given our national history of making bad choices, is it any wonder this extends into the realm of work, too?
  2. Get clear about the qualifications of the job and how you will assess for them. If you are a hiring manager, it is not enough to create a list of qualifications without creating a list of measures for how you want these qualifications evaluated for. Otherwise, too much freedom is given to staff (and yourself) to ask arbitrary questions based upon unrecognized biases,
  3. Stop evaluating for “fit.Only evaluate for qualifications. Admit that you are incompetent to assess for fit and are making arbitrary decisions where you are rationalizing projections (projecting thoughts, feelings, emotions, opinions or judgements onto someone else, rather than admitting to having these thoughts, feelings, emotions, opinions or judgements) as to what a person is like. You are on good behavior and so are they. You have no real idea about what they are really like.
  4. Start to “overshare.” I left one interview having decided to reject an offer when I was told that there was nothing wrong at the firm. People failed because of themselves. Nonsense. There is always something wrong at an organization, just as you as a job hunter or you as a human being have flaws. Employers need to start to “overshare” their flaws as do job hunters.

 

Let’s stop lying to one another and start to join organizations and hire people based upon honesty, not BS. I bet your staff retention and hiring manager remorse will improve.

 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

There Are No Perfect Candidates or New Hires (VIDEO)


I was talking with a friend who is a corporate recruiter. We both agreed about this.

Summary

I have been involved in the fund series of texts with a friend of mine who does recruiting for a firm. They were talking about a video their firm is putting together for job applicants and for their work with hiring managers. When speaking about their work with hiring managers, is not about the recruiting part of it. It is about taking action. And why they need to take action more quickly.

I think this is the lament of every recruiter, both corporate and third-party that hiring managers take their time. They just don't pull the trigger on anything because they keep looking for "the perfect candidate." Let me let you in on the secret.

There is no perfect candidate. There is always a flaw and you tend to find out about it afterwards and I want to explain why.

You tend to find out that this person is not perfect afterwards because everyone is putting on an act during an interview. They are putting on an act; you are putting on an act. They are being phony and so are you.

No one ever tells job applicants at the last for people who sat in that chair or got laid off during bad economic times. No one ever says that. In addition, you tend to be on good behavior and they tend to be on good behavior, too. It is no wonder that there is this frustration that occurs when you discover after they are on board that, shall we say, they are not ideal.

It's 1 of the reasons I tell hiring managers to stop looking for perfection. It doesn't exist. When you screen people, evaluate people for qualifications. Qualifications are the most important thing you can screen for.

You want to send from your troops and want people who offer differing opinions. Fitting in is the wrong approach to take; after all, you want different opinion, right? You want to make sure that you look at things from lots of different angles, instead of getting a completely homogeneous viewpoint.

Again, stop looking for perfection. When you find qualified, move on them! It is not going to get much better. Remember, your last 4 hires were perfect; what makes you think this 1 is going to be any different?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Best Question You Can Ask of Job Applicants on Any Interview (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES (2013)

On this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests a great question you can ask every job applicant that he learned from his son.

NOTE: I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. No BS Hiring Advice and No BS Job Search Advice, have now blended into No BS Coaching Advice Ezine.

Summary

Today I want to talk with you about some no BS hiring advice, some simple, direct, straightforward advice that is designed to help you is in HR professional, he was a manager or director, you as a business owner hire more effectively.

Today's tip really comes from kids. My son is now 16 and I remember when he was much, much younger. Do you remember this question that they would ask (or maybe you remember asking this question yourself)? The question became, "Why?"

"Why" is 1 of the great questions that can be asked on any interview. "Tell me about what you did?" Listen to the answer. "Why was it done that way?" You'll learn something about the potential employee in their thought process. If they haven't delegated to them or really instructed what to do or did they have a creative explanation for why was done that way?

"How much are you looking for in the way of compensation?" "X number of dollars." "Why?" "Because my friends told me I'm worth that." That doesn't mean anything to you, does it?

Try asking the question, "Why," more often, and, if your hiring manager, take a little time to prepare your questions in advance. So often, managers are caught in situations where they are handling too much "stuff" and they haven't really thought through what they're going to ask in order to find out whether someone can actually do the job that is going to be laid out for them.

Take some time to create some canned questions in order to figure out whether this person has the right skills for what you want them to do.

Then, don't forget to ask why as a follow-up to all your questions.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

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The 1 Question Every C Level Candidate Should Be Asked . . . (VIDEO)


(And a Lot of Non-C Suite Potential Hires, Too)

Most C level interviews are very predictable And translate into, “Do you have the required skills,,” and, “Can I trust you?”

Here I offer one question that every person should be asked.. It will reveal a lot about them and it can be asked of you too.

Summary

Meaning.

Few of us like to think of ourselves as cogs in a machine. No where is that more true than in the C suite where a man or woman is hired to embody an idea or concept and lead an organization.

Yet so much of their interview, so much of how a man or woman is measured translates into two things:

Do you have what I believe are the requisite skills and experience that will need to execute in this role.

Do I trust you.

Of the two, usually by the time of the interview, what a firm is really doing is confirming your assertions that you have the requisite experience and looking you square in the eye to see if they believe you.

No wonder interviewing has become such an unsatisfactory way of evaluating potential hires. In most cases, it has turned into "business blind dating" . . . and we know how unsatisfying most blind dates have turned out.

What if I told you that there was one question you could ask that would allow you to identify the special people, the ones that should grade out head and shoulders above the others, would you be interested in using that question in your interview, whether you were a potential employer or C suite hire?

Here's the question:

"Are you familiar with our firm's mission and what does it mean to you?"

There's only one problem with asking this question of Potential C-Suite Hires

There's only one problem . . . Most corporate mission statements are as dry as sand and equally inspiring.

Here are a few examples that may yield defensive responses:

"Serving Others. For Customers, A Better Life. For Shareholders, A Superior Return. For Employees, Respect and Opportunity" (Yawn)

"To provide our policyholders with as near perfect protection, as near perfect service as is humanly possible and to do so at the lowest possible cost.” (I guess it wasn't good enough to provide policyholders with the right protection; they had to give themselves some wiggle room)

"Helping our customers manage document workflow and increase efficiency through best-in-class products and services. Fostering the growth and development of our employees. Providing a distinct advantage to our suppliers as a distribution channel of choice. Growing shareholder value through strong execution of our strategies." (Are you excited?)

"It is the policy of xxxxx to provide products and services to the market which meet or exceed the reasonable expectations of our customers. Satisfying our customers with the appropriate level of quality is a primary goal and a fundamental element of our business mission." (Not a mission statement. It is a policy statement, hence a goal).

Let me contrast these with:

"(Our) mission is to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected. People use (us) to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them."

or

“to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.”

or

"We enable businesses to thrive and economies to prosper, helping people fulfill their hopes and dreams and realize their ambitions."

When did business stop believing in becoming bold and breathtakingly great? In our search for meaning, do you think we will be more inspired by offering a leader the opportunity to help a firm become "near perfect" or "helping businesses thrive, economies prosper and people fulfill hopes and dreams?" Do mission statements that could be used in a greeting card help attract exceptional leaders or cause them to be repelled?

And, if you tell me that the mission statement means nothing and the last time it was referred to by management was during the last century, what are you telling the public about your words having meaning?

Mission statements should be a rallying point for everyone to be extraordinary so that your firm can be extraordinary. If they ave no meaning to you, take it off your website and abandon the lie. However if they do have meaning, ask potential hires if they are familiar with your firm's mission (first tip off of adequate preparation) and what that mission means to them.

And if you are looking at a firm as a potential employer, ask the people you meet with about the firm's mission and what it means to them. You will learn something about the leadership of the organization and its congruence with its avowed values.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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