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Stupid Interview Mistakes: Being Unprepared (VIDEO)


I discuss another cardinal sin of interviewing–unpreparedness

Summary

I want to talk with you about another 1 of those stupid interview that job hunters make way too often. This is the mistake of being unprepared.

If you're aggressively looking for work, you may be sending out your resume to tons of different places. You just don't remember. The phone rings, they start saying, "Hi! My name is so and so. You forwarded your resume," and your 1st response is, "Which position is this?"

Right off the bat you let people know that you are spamming your resume to a bunch of places. I'll be kind. . . You submitted your resume to a lot of different places looking for jobs. The way to handle that situation is to say, "I want to talk with you. I am in with someone right now. Can I call you back at…? (Offer up time)" this way, you can go back to your notes, see which job this was and then be able to speak intelligently about your background and how it fits. Remember, your job is to talk about what you've done that relates to what they are looking for and not just talk about what you've done.

Another boo-boo, and this 1 is even worse. You're an in person interview. They just invited you into talk. You taking no time to research the firm and what it does. A lot of firms like to know you understand some basic information about them so that you can link it to what you've done, not just simply what they're looking for what their business does.

Or, you walk in the door and sit down and basically say, "So, which job is this?" Or words to that effect. There are lots of little ways that it comes across that you are unprepared to talk about their job. You can't do this. What you're basically doing is indicating that you don't care. What does it really take to be prepared? After you submit a resume, you save the original job and into a file refer to it before the interview. It's that simple.

Don't be unprepared. It sends a bad signal to an employer about laziness . You don't want to be doing that. You always want to be in control and demonstrating that you are a professional.

Rather than be unprepared, in the case of a phone call, simply say, "Can I get your name and number and can I give you a call back in about an hour," or "Can I call you back at 2:30?" Whatever the time is. "That doesn't work for me. Can we do it at 4 PM?"

"Sure, we can do that four."

"What's your number?" You get your notes and call back, look at your job description so as you're ready. You will be able to speak intelligently about your background and how it fits their job.

Even knowing what the job description says, remember to ask my Single Best Question You Should Ask On Any Interview before things kick off because things may have changed a little bit since the 1st conversation or since you saw the ad.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Pay Attention to the Signals in the Job Description and Interview (VIDEO)


Both job descriptions and initial interviews have signals as to what the real need is. Here, I encourage you to listen to and look for the cues in both.

Summary

I was coaching someone yesterday who was up for a very senior position and, in the course of the conversation, he reminded me of something in his circumstances that I thought would be helpful to you as well. What he reminded me of was paying attention to language that is used in the job description , or by the questions that are asked by HR that signal certain things that may not be initially obvious to you.

For example, in his case, he was told by HR that the next interview was going to be with someone who wants to 4X growth in his particular business unit. We start to work on how to present his experience along those lines. In the course of his next interview. And thus we came up with describing his background with "aggressive growth." That dealt with percentages, their language used "times." He was involved with 3X growth in his particular situation. Recognize that there are signals that are used in job descriptions or in the questions that HR asks that can be a single to you and how they communicate information that they are looking for.

Another thing that came up in a different conversation was of concern that one firm had about someone where someone perceived that his background was more internally oriented, rather than externally oriented. He was savvy enough to pick up on it. He told them, "I just want to be clear that I've had 5 years of internal experience and of those 5, 3 of them were taking internally developed programs and bringing them to customers and converting them from internal systems to external systems. Thus, of my 20 or 22 years of background, 17 really related to external customers." Notice warm going with this? You always want to be listening for cues that might come from job descriptions and/or interviews that signal the real interest that the firm has.

Job descriptions contain a list of qualifications though firm is looking for. You are trying to find out what you can do for them. You are looking for ways that allow you to demonstrate that you, as a professional, whether your staff level individual or in the C suite, have the capacity to deliver what it is that they want and, as you know, sometimes the job descriptions and interviewing is a little obtuse.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Learning to Network | Job Search Radio

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to start networking especially if you don’t think you’re good at it.
 
 
 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Follow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: Blindfolded at a Table | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ooooh! A fun brainteaser!

Summary

I have 1 of those fun hedge fund is today. I'm going to read it and the answer off my screen. I'm going to give credit to a website,, thebrainteaserBible.com where I found this.

You are blindfolded and sit in front of the table. On the table and many coins, 10 of which have heads facing up. How do you split the coins into 2 groups such that the same number of coins are heads up in each group? You don't know how many coins there are. You cannot tell which coin is facing up in any way?

This is a two-step answer to it.. The 1st is that you take time coins from the group of coins you have. Let's say there are 50 points, you take 10. You take all the coins of the group of 10 and Turn them onto their opposite side. Now you're done. Here's how it works..

If there are 50 coins, and you separate them into 10, you now have a group of 10 and you now have a group of 40. Let's say there are 3 groups in the group of 10. There will be 7 in the group of 40. From the group of 10, There are 3 coins their heads, and 7 coins that are on tails. Turnover the coins in the group of 10. Now there are 7 heads and 3 tails. Now, there are 7 hands in the group of 40. Now there are 7 in each group.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Job Search Radio: Owning vs. Renting Your Career


Once upon a time boys and girls, a person went to work right out of high school confident that they would be able to work for an employer until retirement, Fat chance of that happening now!

On this show, I speak with Kevin Kermes of All Things Career about constructive ways to look at your career. Rather than allowing yourself to get “stuck” doing work you don’t enjoy, Kevin offers a formula to help you think holistically about your career and come up with an answer for yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Don’t Let Them Distract You (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you know not to pay attention to employer BS and keep your eye on the prize.

Summary

You got to think of it like the Wizard of Oz-- don't look what's behind the curtain. Just pay attention to the big, powerful voice. Don't worry about what's behind the curtain.

Let me take you behind the curtain for second. One of the classic that employers try to do Is distract you into the job and focusing about the job, rather than the money. The probability is you are not a wealthy person. If you are this is not for you. You can click away now. The fact of the matter is that almost everyone who listens to the show is trying to improve themselves professionally. AND make more money.

When employers try to do is talk with you about how important what you are going to learn is, how important are going to be in the firm and give you a warm fuzzy feeling... And avoid the money conversation except to talk you down from what you really want. I want to remind you that money is incredibly important.

I've made this next point and other videos. If you get $5000 more over the course of 5 years, pretax between salary increases and raises That you will get over 5 years, you will be ahead by about $25,000 and $26,500 more than if you accept a lateral might be offered to you.

However, if what you do is get $10,0000 more, that is going to become $51,000 or $52,000 more.. If you get $15,000 more,, that becomes between $75,000 and $78000 in increased earnings..Change jobs before the 4th year In either of these scenarios you will have catapulted quite a bit more.

As far as I can tell, money should be important to you and shouldn't be lost from your equation of evaluating things. Don't focus on the deflection. You know, I'm I pretend to be the puppetmaster here… Talk to the hand while I completely hypnotize you with what I'm saying here and avoid the money.

Let me take a quick story. Someone came to me for coaching advice. We reviewed some of the decisions he made in the previous job search. I listen to a story and listen to his story and said to them, "You have made some mistakes."

"What kind of mistakes that I make?"

"You fell for the BS. Employers have trick you into focusing on the career opportunity and the same employers of the firms that laid you off when times get a little tough. When that have been better if you had a few thousand dollars more in your pocket then to be out of work for 4 months like you are now?"

Recognize that you have to look out for yourself. You have to look after your family. The employer isn't going to do that. The hiring manager that is telling you all this wonderful stuff may get fired, just like you at the time of the next economic crisis.

Pay attention to the money. I'm not saying to hold out and squeeze them and bleed them dry. Push up a little bit. Don't just accept the 1st offer. Try to do a little negotiating, see if you can up the money. Like I said, $5000 more over the course of 5 years is an extra $25,000 pretax. Let's say you're the highest tax bracket, that's an extra $12,500 or $13,000 In your pocket. Would you rather have that?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The “I Have Another Offer” Gambit (VIDEO)


My opinion of the “I have another offer” gambit.

Summary

Someone wrote to me asking about the classic scenario where they want to purchase the process along. They want to tell the employer that they have another offer and see if that will really facilitate things and get things going.

Few employers are affected by that anymore. Doing that without another job offer Reminds me of "last century behavior," where a woman would tell a man that they were pregnant and they weren't. You are telling them that you have another offer and don't have one and you are trying to push this along. These days, the tactic doesn't work as often as it used to.

Firms don't care because there are another 50 people just like you, begging for this job. They are not complete with the process so the probability is That it is not going to work.

If it does work, YIPPEE! FABULOUS! Good for you. You pull that off. Usually, firms just continue the process and circle back with they are ready to make a decision.

Let me be clear that if you do have another offer, one that you would feel comfortable accepting, By all means you should tell this firm and push them along.

"I have an offer for such and such with the firm that interested in AND I really like your opportunity. If you can move things along. I have to respond by such and such date. If not I'm going to accept the other offer because the proverbial bird in the hand . . . Yada yada yada."

Don't expect that lying is going to get you anywhere. Do expect that if you have another offer, It doesn't matter to you, because your something that you would say "yes" to.If it's something that you wouldn't say "yes" to, you still have the option of using the strategy.

I just don't like it. under the circumstances where you don't have something because it is like you are pushing your chips all in and don't have a good hand at all. The likelihood is that the bluff in the card game will work is pretty small because they smell it and you just seem more nervous Then you do when you actually do have the offer.

Can I come back and work? You bet it can! Statistically it will work a lot less than it used to.

Can you get into trouble? Of course, not. Is not like there is a database of information employers keep and share with one another About people who do "strange things" to them. What there is are "long memories." Individuals have long memories and,, if they find out that you lied, they remember this kind of stuff..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes: 10 Mistakes Job Hunters Make WAY Too Often

During the early era of American television, one of the most popular tv shows was one hosted by Art Linkletter called, “Kids Say The Darndest Things.” During the show, Linkletter would ask very young grade school children very simple questions like, “What does your Mommy do?” A child actually answered, “She does a little housework, then sits around all day reading the Racing Form.” That was one of the answers that would bring down the house every week.

Young children have an excuse for why they might say such things. Adult job hunters have no excuse for saying and doing so many of the darndest things. Here are a few that I thought I would share.

  1. Oversharing. Sometimes, it is fascinating to debrief candidates after interviews and find out some of the things they say. One was asked about who he works with and described them as “slobs and Indians.” Someone actually thought that it was a good idea to be insulting and racist on an interview. Amazing.
  2. Being Unprepared. I started in recruiting more than 40 years ago before moving into coaching. Back in The Stone Ages, it was hard to research employers. You actually had to go to a library and use microfiche or read original newspapers. Unless you were interviewing with a senior executive with the firm or with the PR head, you could never obtain any information about a person you were meeting with in advance of your interview. LinkedIn and Google make things much easier, don’t they? Yet there are people who arrive unprepared, knowing nothing about their potential employer or the hiring manager(s) they are meeting with. Insane!
  3. Lying. It used to be hard and take time in order to be found out. Your new employer would have to type a letter to your former employer who have to look up information in file cabinets in order to substantiate your previous dates and salary. Now, they start off by comparing what you uploaded to their applicant tracking system the last time you were looking for a job and applied to them to see that you have covered up that previous employer or are lying about your salary. You can be disqualified before speaking with anyone. And it happens all the time and no one will ever tell you.

4. Forgetting/Ignoring the Original Question and Babbling On. When qualifying people or doing mock interviews, job hunters will have done so many interviews that they clairvoyantly believe they know what the interviewer is looking for so they go off on this long monologue about what they’ve done and how they went about doing it in response to the question, “Tell me about yourself.” I remember listening to someone for about 5 minutes,and asking, “By any chance, do you remember my original question?” They didn’t.

5. Seeming Angry. Like a lover scorned, they arrive at their interview ready to complain and moan about their previous manager, co- workers, how they have been mistreated and more. Like a date who is stuck pretending to listen, your interviewer is calculating when the right time is to end their interview.

6. Not Knowing “The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview” and When To Ask It. Interviews are normally constructed for a hiring manager or HR professional to elicit information from you at their pace in ways that don’t help you. Not knowing the one question that levels the playing field and allows you to talk about what you’ve done that matters to them and not just talk about what you’ve done is a colossal mistake.

7. Saying Different Things to Different People You Interview With. Imagine telling people radically different or subtly things about your role, responsibilities and your level of impact or success. Do you think people don’t compare notes?

8. Arriving Late (or Missing the Interview Altogether) and Not Acknowledging It. Things happen but you acknowledge and apologize for being late. You apologize and explain your (perhaps) confusion that caused you to miss the interview. Trust me. No one will hire you (although they might re-schedule you) unless you acknowledge the previous ) confusion that caused you to miss the interview. Trust me. No one will hire you (although they might re-schedule you) unless you acknowledge the previous “bad behavior.” In just lingers around the relationship stinking things up.

9. Asking Stupid Questions.

“Do you give a drug test?”

“Do you do a background check?“

“Do you have any other jobs available?

These are just a few of the “brilliant questions” people have asked (For more) on job interviews.

10. Creating a Weak First Impression Whether the weak impression is created because you have a soft handshake (shaking hands with a fish), your hands are cold or are sweaty, your body language is poor, you’re dressed poorly by the standards of the firm you’re interviewing with or some other reason, if your first impression is weak it is hard to recover and win the interview.

What stupid interview mistakes have you run into when interviewing someone? Leave a message below.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2017    

If you liked this article, read “Who Can Help With a Job Search” at www.JobSearchCoachingHQ.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Radio: Instagram and Pinterest for Job Search


I interview Holly Bunn, a professional resume writer and coach, about using these two tools as part of a job search. Holly’s LinkedIn profile is https://www.linkedin.com/in/hollybunn

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Your Best Position for Negotiating Salary | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses your most advantaged position for negotiating salary and how to play it.
 
 
Summary

You need to understand that with most organizations, they have salary guidelines that HR and hiring managers works with. It's not like they can take you from making $80,000 per year and give you $160,000. No matter how good you are, it just doesn't work that way.

With big companies, the basic strategy is always that you should get two offers. Not one but two. You have to time this out around the same time so that in this way, there's a certain amount of pressure on the employer. After all, from their standpoint, they have spent a lot of money interviewing and assessing candidates and deciding that you are the right one.

What you want to be doing is getting two firms in play. They're not going to bid aggressively against one another. It's not like they're going to say, "We're going to offer you $120,000."

"We are going to offer you one $130,000."

"When you change your mind and we're going to offer you $140,000!"

They will work to exceed something; don't talk with you about some of the benefits that they offer you. They may "goose" certain things but when push comes to shove in the big company market, normally, the lowball bidder tries to match the highball bidder. They can go back to the highball firm and say, "I have 2 offers at the same level. I prefer yours. Can you do a touch better?"

Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate A Higher Salary for Yourself." What that technique will do is get them to boost the offer little bit more so that you up the ante.

Now, at small companies, you get two offers, a big company and a small company, often the small company will do a little bit better, but they will never really match the big company. The big company just has deeper pockets. Maybe you'll get more benefits, more stock options, more things along those lines that will turn you on.

Recognize that a small company or a start up, sometimes their reaction is to go, "You know, if you are considering that another firm, you are not our kind of person." You have to be cautious with small firms when you are doing small company versus big company competing situations.

Two small companies. 2 startups. They get into (excuse my language) pissing wars with one another where they are beating down the other firms ideas, where they are talking with you about how good they are. You really need to bring them back to the money.

"I really appreciate more options here."

"Well, this is what we give out to people."

"I know. AND I would like more options here. I would like to get more money."

Do something that pushes them. Whoever comes in a little bit higher, that's the one you go to.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedInFollow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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