Secrets of Successful People They Are in Charge (VIDEO)


Continuing my series on secrets of successful people, I discuss another quality that they possess– they are in charge . . . But not in the way that your thinking.

Summary

I am continuing the series that I'm doing about the secrets of successful people. The title is a little misleading in that most people will think they when I say, "THEY ARE IN CHARGE," that I mean that they are the boss of their own enterprise. They are the owner. They are that this. They are the that. The fact is that that is not what I am talking about.

People who are successful act like professionals. They work at their craft. If they don't feel like doing something that is part of their job they do it anyway. You see what they learned over the course of time is that practice does make perfect. Maybe not perfect but it does make better than they are now. The result was a being that for most (for lack of a better term) "amateurs," they quit on themselves. They sell themselves short. They think, "I'm not good at this," and as a result, don't strive to achieve more.

I was coaching someone, a week or 2 ago who is trying to put together a program for an organization that she is involved with and she was saying, "I'm not a creative sorts. I can do a lot of the tactical things and I'm not really good at thinking creatively." That was her patented excuse for why she couldn't do this project.

As I start to explore things with her, I got her to see that creativity, although there are gifts to it, for many is an acquired craft. As you start to develop more objective skill and more measurable skill, often the creativity comes in later. For her, her mind was so locked in. That was hard for her to see anything differently.

For you who may be looking at how to be successful, there are times where you're going to want to shut up, shut down and not do the work. I'm often reminded of a quote, "The secret to success without work is still a secret." I love that quote!

There are no accidents. There are no guarantees. Putting the effort in and taking charge of your mind, and the ways that it sabotages you is a starting place for a lot of successful people.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

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Branding Yourself For Job Search Success | Job Search Radio


Most people do not appreciate how important branding is to your job search and professional success.

On this show, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with Kevin Kermes about the importance of branding, both the strategy and tactics as well as the underlying message, and then arming people with the information to advocate for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Are Interviewers Looking for When Interviewing Candidates? (VIDEO)

 

Every company describes it differently but it comes down to a few things.

Summary

I received a question from someone among the many I received in the last few days and the question reads, “What are interviewers looking for when interviewing candidates?”

I think of it as a math formula– it’s five C’s.

The first see is competence—the person should be competent by some measure that the firm defines in order to be hired however I want you to understand that not everyone is hired is competent so there, obviously, are other factors that come into play.

The second one is confidence or self-confidence really. Doze the person inspire confidence that they are the solution the need they have to have done.

So we’ve got competence and confidence. The next one is character. Do you demonstrate character on some of the behavioral interview questions? Do you come across as a character or some combination of the two?  Most firms want to hire people with personality and who have good character.

Chemistry is next. Will you fit into the group and, to me, this is the most problematic area because chemistry often is the place where bias shows.

So, for example, how are you like Ramesh? He’s that guy who just does everything right. She reminds me of Beth. The issue comes down to is not really seeing the person for who they are. They are not really seeing who you are. They are working off of associations. This is pure fantasy on their part.

The next one is charisma. Charismatic people always do better than non-charismatic people and I can prove that by pointing out a couple of US elections–Obama versus McCain, Obama versus Romney– Not exactly big charismatic figures running except for Obama. How about Clinton-Dole or Clinton-Bush or Reagen-Mondale or Reagan versus Carter? Clearly the charismatic person won in each of those elections even though their politics were very different. So you see charisma always comes into the equation.

So we’ve got competence, confidence, chemistry, charisma all this adds up to PL and that translates into personal leadership.

Are you someone who just appears to have self-direction that allows people to believe in you and to rely upon you.

To me, this is what companies look for.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Acing a Panel Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 731 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter helps to explain the format and reasoning behind what occurs at a panel interview and how to ace them every time.

Summary

Today, I'm going to talk with you about panel interviewing, which is a different sort of orientation and feel to it than a traditional interview. Why? Because 3 or 4 people are sitting opposite you putting you through "The Great Inquisition" to figure out how you fit.

How do you prepare for panel? Real easy. Let's start by figuring out who you are going to be sitting and facing, what their particular backgrounds are, what their role is in the organization and thus, you can figure out what their agenda is.

You see, the members of the panel aren't four people from the same group or department; often they are from related groups and departments. They may do similar things. They may interact with one another, but ultimately, they have a different agenda in mind.

The other thing to remember is what ever it is you may answer may engender a response from 1 of the other panel members. If the role, you may be talking to a panel member from one department (let's use IT as an example)... You may talk to member the programming team, but there was someone there representing the user community. They want to understand how your answer relates to them. It's not that they don't understand by your answer may trigger something for them.

Also remember that the 3 or 4 people there... They are all vying for their questions to come out. They are all looking for face time with you. They're all looking to evaluate because ultimately have to give you a thumb up or thumbs down at the end of this process.

As you answer questions, understand who you are talking to and what their role is. As you speak to the questioner, the person who poses the initial question to you, you start talking with them , but then start turning your head to start talking with the other people who are part of the panel. Always in your answer talking to the original question.

It is a subtle thing that allows you to do what is really important in the room-- that is trying to develop rapport with each person who is there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Best Way to Find Work After You Graduate College | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the best way to find a job after you graduate.

Summary

I'm often asked to help out a student with finding work. The 1st question I ask is, "During your 4 years in college, what did you do to make relationships with people who are already working?" Often, the answer is nothing. I know that was true of me. You are here looking. I want to give you the best advice that I can.

If you are still in school, you are basically preparing for the job market is to make friends with people who are already in the job market who are working for firms that you want to work for. For example, if you want to work for a startup, make friends with people who work for that start. Don't know who they are? This is your time to get on LinkedIn, start following the firm, connecting with people who work for the firm, trying to set up an informational interview with people who work for the firm. From that, start working to build relationships with people. You are not asking for a job. You're asking questions about what it is like to work there, what you need to know in order to do it, how does the firm hire interns or could I do some gratis work here as a way of helping the firm to better… Stuff like that. When you work at this and talk to these people, you are 100% on your game! In this way, they see you at your best and manager half assed.

Start networking while you are in school because after graduation, it's really too late.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The Basic Principles of Networking

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses two basic principles of networking that you must follow.

Summary

I have advice for you today about the importance of networking.  For many of you, you are doing it all wrong.  To you network is being online.  You are on LinkedIn. You're making connections with people.  You are doing a whole bunch of stuff.  But you're not really talking to anyone.

Yes, it is important to influence people with how you communicate.  You are absolutely right.  There is a difference, however, when you are talking with someone for real, with meeting with someone for real and doing online networking.

I want to encourage you to get out of the house, get out of your office, and start scheduling regular sessions where you start meeting with people.

There was a suggestion made some years ago to have lunch with someone every day. That was a networking strategy.  I want to encourage you to talk with someone every day about some professional circumstance where you are creating an influence, or you are creating your brand/an image in people's minds. Help them.  Chat with them.  See where they can use advice and counsel.. Doing things like that where you are actually sitting in talking with someone, as opposed to emailing or texting will go a long way toward creating the sort of influence is going to help you with getting an introduction at a time that you will need it.

Again, as I said in a recent video, the next recession is coming.  I don't know when it is coming but there is another recession that is going to be coming.  I have my opinions about when that is going to be, but it is irrelevant. If I am right or wrong.  Ultimately another recession is going to come.  You want to be in a position where people know you, like you and trust you.  And want to help you.  They understand what you do and they know you like you, trust you and want to help you.  

Get out and talk to people.

Help.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Why Do Behavioral Interview Questions Work? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 730 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why behavioral interview questions work. NOTE: Now the place on my website to look is by clicking the link for the blog and using tags to find answers to Tough Interview Questions.

Summary

I was asked the question, "Why do behavioral interviews work?"

What is a behavioral interview? This is a type of interview where you are asked, "Tell me about a time when you…" You know, the one where you are able to tell stories. Even the toughest question you can find the answer on the web.. I have a ton of them at my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us and search the blog, I have videos that cover so many of those questions. Yet job hunters don't take the time to practice. You don't spend the time learning how to answer these questions and you don't spend the time and review. Just like you don't take the time to practice answering simple questions like, "Tell me about yourself." You think you should just walk in and wing it.

So that's why employers use this question... Because somebody job hunters are too lazy to take the time to be a champion. Let me use the metaphor of an athlete.

When you think of a pro football team coming out on the field, do you think they haven't practiced repeatedly all the same place for years? Do you think a baseball player hasn't spent time in the batting cage learning how to hit? Do you think they don't practice the defense of plays and cutoffs in order to execute them on the field? Do you think you can go on an interview and just show up.

Do the smart thing. Start learning how to answer these questions. Again, there are a bunch of them that my website.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Why Are Most Recruiters Unhelpful? (VIDEO)


Why is her most recruiters unhelpful and tend to constantly ignore emails from applicants in the interview process? From my experience, recruiters always say something along the lines of, “Don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions,” but 90% of the time if it is not something they want to know from you such as your availability for interviews, it will just ignore your question or email.

Summary

The question for today is, "Why are most recruiters unhelpful and tend to ignore emails from applicants during the interview process? From my experience, recruiters always say something along the lines of, 'Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.' But 90% of the time. It's only when they want something from you, like your availability for an interview, that you will hear from them."

You have to understand the job of a recruiter. I always start off at this basic point – – how much are you paying them? Probably nothing. How much is an employer paying them? Employers are paying their fee. Thus, they are being paid to find the person who fits a job requirement and are qualified to do what employer needs to have done. Period. Everything else is window dressing.

So that you have questions, well, they are not paid to answer questions. Coaches are. As a result, you have this mistaken notion that they are working for you or that you are working together to find you a job. That could be furthest from the case.

Those kind of phrases like, "Don't hesitate to reach out," our part of the seduction that recruiters used to help build relationship. The idea of the relationship is designed to engender trust by you (which obviously isn't occurring here) so that at the time with the employer extends a job offer you are less resistant to their "closing techniques" that will allow them to earn a fee.

They are not there to answer your questions. They are not social workers. They are not counselors. They are there to recruit talent and fill positions and coincidentally make you happy.

Before you start replying and telling me that without you they don't earn their fee, that is absolutely right. However, there are a lot more review than there are employers willing to pay them a fee. Recruiters always believe that they can get a replacement person because they have proven it time and time again.

You, on the other hand, want that one job and, as a result, recruiters are not particularly responsive unless the client asked to meet with you, if there is the possibility that you might use that information to take a different job than the one that they are representing. After all, why should they help you? Their job is to deliver you to their client an unnecessarily help YOU get a job.

So, the confusion, the question comes from the mistaken notion that they should be responsive to you. That's not their job. In recruiters there to fill positions with companies and coincidentally coaching into getting that job with their client. Period. In doing so, they earn a fee from that employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How Do Interviewers Identify Phony Candidates? (VIDEO)

 

A few ways we who interview figure it out.

Summary

How do interviewers identify phony job applicants? I wish I could give you a simple answer, but there are 1,000,001 ways that we do it. I'll start by saying that begins with our experience. Because we talked to a lot of people. I use myself as an example.

I worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. I've spoken to hundreds of thousands of people. I looked at even more resumes than that. My website says over 600,000. But that's as many as I been able to quantify. There are plenty more from before I ever started counting that have since turned up.

There are a few obvious ways. You claim credit for more far more than you could have possibly accomplished in a particular period of time. I remember one person who sent the resume to me many years ago who claimed you designed and implemented 25 major systems at firm within 6 months of his joining. Help me understand how you do that! You start to see the DS patterns.

When you're actually interviewing someone, we scratch beneath the surface there is a lot of hemming and hawing or distraction, or fumbling around rather than giving the clarity of an answer. We scratch that even one layer down from that, your BS detector goes off something fierce! It is just something in the way the person is telling the story that lets you know that there's bull there.

Another way involves references. You may give me a reference but when I called the firm that reference doesn't work there (that's because I'd rather go through the corporate switchboard, rather than go directly to the person with the phone number and been given). You may say they are a former employee, go to HR and find out and find out whether they are a former employee and discover that you have been lying to me.

There are a lot of different ways that we find it.

There are so many signals the job hunters give you in the course of interviewing them that let you know that you are lying. Again, this is putting aside whether in a technical discussion, whether that is in engineering, IT, accounting, whether you can actually demonstrate that you have the knowledge that you are claiming to have the knowledge of. Book learning is different than the real McCoy.

You always will be able to demonstrate that your experience is congruent with what has been described in your resume and that there are people there to back it up.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.  Him him

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Being Unprepared | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 729 I discuss another cardinal sin of interviewing–unpreparedness

Summary

I want to talk with you about another 1 of those stupid interview that job hunters make way too often. This is the mistake of being unprepared.

If you're aggressively looking for work, you may be sending out your resume to tons of different places. You just don't remember. The phone rings, they start saying, "Hi! My name is so and so. You forwarded your resume," and your 1st response is, "Which position is this?"

Right off the bat you let people know that you are spamming your resume to a bunch of places. I'll be kind. . . You submitted your resume to a lot of different places looking for jobs. The way to handle that situation is to say, "I want to talk with you. I am in with someone right now. Can I call you back at…? (Offer up time)" this way, you can go back to your notes, see which job this was and then be able to speak intelligently about your background and how it fits. Remember, your job is to talk about what you've done that relates to what they are looking for and not just talk about what you've done.

Another boo-boo, and this 1 is even worse. You're an in person interview. They just invited you into talk. You taking no time to research the firm and what it does. A lot of firms like to know you understand some basic information about them so that you can link it to what you've done, not just simply what they're looking for what their business does.

Or, you walk in the door and sit down and basically say, "So, which job is this?" Or words to that effect. There are lots of little ways that it comes across that you are unprepared to talk about their job. You can't do this. What you're basically doing is indicating that you don't care. What does it really take to be prepared? After you submit a resume, you save the original job and into a file refer to it before the interview. It's that simple.

Don't be unprepared. It sends a bad signal to an employer about laziness . You don't want to be doing that. You always want to be in control and demonstrating that you are a professional.

Rather than be unprepared, in the case of a phone call, simply say, "Can I get your name and number and can I give you a call back in about an hour," or "Can I call you back at 2:30?" Whatever the time is. "That doesn't work for me. Can we do it at 4 PM?"

"Sure, we can do that four."

"What's your number?" You get your notes and call back, look at your job description so as you're ready. You will be able to speak intelligently about your background and how it fits their job.

Even knowing what the job description says, remember to ask my Single Best Question You Should Ask On Any Interview before things kick off because things may have changed a little bit since the 1st conversation or since you saw the ad.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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