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You Need to Change Jobs to Get Ahead (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s critical for you to make strategic job changes periodically to get ahead.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the fact that you really need to change jobs from time to time. The system is set up to keep you in a tough position financially.

Think about it. If you stay in one organization, most people are going to get very modest salary increases. When you're the junior level, they may give you $5000 or $10,000. That may sound like a big percentage when you are making $50,000. They may say it is a 10% or 20% increase... But think about it. Archer costs going up even more? Isn't the government taking more in taxes? You are basically standing still.

When you become more experienced in the percentage increase comes down a lot (many individuals are getting 2%, 3% or 4% increases), even at that $50,000 level, haven't you noticed your insurance premiums have increased? Haven't you noticed that everything your bind cost a lot more than it used to? Movie tickets are going up?

Financially, the system is really set up to force you to change jobs. If you are getting that 3%, 4% or 5% raise, how do you get ahead financially?

Here's some simple math. If you change jobs as a $50,000 your person, and you change jobs for another $5000, if you didn't change jobs again, over the next 5 years receive the same modest increase of 3% or 4%, you probably be ahead by about $27,000 pretax. By changing jobs one time and staying there for 5 years, this is where you would pay.

If you change jobs one time and 3 years into your tenure with this 1 firm, you change jobs again, you would be $35,000 ahead pretax even though in the way that I've explained this you did not get a raise during that five-year period of time. I'm not saying that $5000 Is is a big increase. Obviously, it isn't.

But let's look at $10,000 or $15,000 increases and see what happens. If you get a $10,000 raise for changing jobs and stay there for 5 years, you would be about $53,000 ahead Given that modest 3% or 4% increase. If you changed jobs a 2nd time, you be about $74,000 or $75,000 ahead. How can you stay still at your current organization within give you a 3% decrease when they are just telling you that you are doing great work? That handshake they give you is not going to pay your bills when they start increasing!

My advice to you is to be smart.. Do what organizations do when they start establishing a budget. When things get tough, they do what's right for the stockholders and for the Board of Directors and they cut jobs, right? They look out for the business interests and, if that involves you, tough luck. You have to look out for the Board of Directors for your organization. "Atta boys," and, "Atta girls,"

"You're doing a great job. We're going to give you a promotion. You're doing great work."

I've got to tell you that other firms will have you do great work, too. AND you will make a lot more money.

My advice to you is to be smart and start looking for something else from time to time and if you just want to keep your profile up to date on LinkedIn and attract recruiters to it, think of it like a resume with keywords.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t Forget . . . | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 610 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not forget to ask about your retirement planning.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the criteria that fewer individuals are using when they evaluate job offers.

It's important to consider the money. It's important to consider the benefits. I want to point this one out because it was a mistake I made early in my career; I just want to make sure that you avoid it in yours. That is, look at retirement planning.

You may be 22. at this point and retirement may be 100 years from now. But, the fact of the matter remains, it can be free money that, when compounded over the course of your career, can be money that you can use and will need. And, trust me when I say this, I wish I had done it differently myself.

With that being the case, there's another thing that people need to evaluate when you evaluate offers-- career pathing. When a firm talks with you about a job offer, you have interviewed about the job they have available today and you need to also ask, "2 or 3 years from now, where am I going to be? What kind of options might exist for me. If I do a great job? What is this firm normally do to rotate people in the organization?"

This is important because, think about it for a second, if you were to do the same job for the next 5 years of your life, 15 years of your life, 40 years of your life, I think you might want to put a bullet in your head. I know from my experience as a recruiter, you kind of do the same thing over and over again. One of the reasons I do this podcasts is to keep myself fresh because, all day long, I am staring at resumes, I'm talking with people, I am doing business development to open up new accounts, I am responding to customer inquiries,, negotiating salaries and people… All the same tasks.

What I set out to do is to create a little bit of freshness. So I started to write books, do videos, do podcasts, do a whole host of things to make my work more interesting to me Because the job of recruiter is extremely repetitive.

Do you want to be in a position where you are doing the same job for 40 years? No change whatsoever? I don't think so.

So, asked him about career pathing. Asked him about where you can go a few years from now. No guarantees, obviously. But what is the pattern of rotating people into newer opportunities.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Cutting The Line


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/02/21/cutting-the-line/

Ep 245 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a strategy for you to get ahead once you have your next job.

Summary

So many people believe in making incremental job changes and doing the slow, working your way up the ladder thing. That may work for some people but a lot of you can be doing much more.

I want to remind you, using Barack Obama as an example, there is someone who is in assemblyman who became US Senator and immediately began running for president. Maybe you sat in the Senate for less than a year before she went out campaigning. He wound up working the system in a way that served him many of you believe it serve the country and if you don't. This is not about politics. However, I am to look at him from a career perspective as being someone who made quick enormous jumps that allowed him to advance.

This is an easy work and it certainly wasn't for him. Certainly it would be for anyone is able to take advantage of this.

If you're out of work trying to find something, this isn't a strategy for you. However, if you or someone who has something right now, this is the time to start looking for that next big leap so that you're not changing jobs incrementally for the $2000 raise, the $5000 raise. You are going for the big jumps. You're going for the big moves... And you have the experience to back it up.

In politics, is pretty common for presidents to be younger than senators or congressmen , but in business. We look at our progression as being one slow step up the ladder to another, until, eventually, we are supposed to hit the top. It doesn't work that way, doesn't it?

Let's not kid ourselves. You are not going to incrementally work your way up the ladder. You may need to start a business. You may need to take advantage of your connections and keep building networks after you have landed in order to take this big leap. However, you do it, you just gotta do in order to get that to the top faster, rather than on that slow boat.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Asking Your Manager if Your Job Is Safe (VIDEO)

From The Archives

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice for people who are worried about their jobs

 

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about those times in your career when you are hearing about the potential for layoffs.

Often, when John Hunter started thinking about job hunting, it's because there are some rumors going on in their offices. They are hearing "stuff." There is the grapevine going on. There are going to be job cuts occurring. Suddenly, people start talking to one another. It becomes a situation of the blind leading the blind.

Sometimes, there is the brave soul who has the courage to talk to their boss or manager. They asked them, "Hey! It is my job safe? Do I have anything to worry about? What do you think?"

95 times out of 100, what the manager tells them, "There is nothing to worry about. You are very important to us. Really. Don't worry about it."

When you stop and think about it, that manager doesn't know anything more than the subordinate does is coming to talk to them. That manager is so far down the ladder on a low wrong that all they are trying to do is hold that employee in place. They don't have any more information that the employee does.

Let's stop kidding ourselves. Let's start by analyzing.

Frankly, if you have reason to worry, there is a bigger problem that is going on. Your firm is struggling. You are reading about it in the press. Everyone is cutting back on jobs. Why would you put up with that?

Instead of waiting passively to see if the shoe will drop, put yourself in the position to be found. Put yourself in the position where your profile is up to date on LinkedIn where you might have your resume on a job order two. Where you are starting to network with some people, maybe a former manager of yours who is at another organization that may be in better shape than yours.

Connect with them. Talk with them. Get a feel from them about what's going on at their office. Maybe, there is a place for you at their firm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

10 Career Management Mistakes You May Be Making


Here are 10 things you may be doing that hurt yourself.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Preparing for The Inevitable Layoffs (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you need to do to prepare for that inevitable change in skills employers demand.

Summary

I saw to statistic in the book I was reading that I thought was really interesting. The 1st 1, in 2008 to 2009, when so many millions of Americans were laid off, 2.8 million in 2008, and another few million in 2009, the unemployment rate for individuals earning over $100,000 per year was approximately 1%. What does that tell you?

It tells me that there are experience and skills that firm's value for that compensation level that you need to develop.

The 2nd statistic. When you look back in time, the American population worked primarily in agriculture 100 years ago. 80% of Americans worked in agriculture 100 years ago. Now it is less than 2% who work in agriculture. They feed, not only the United States but a good part of the world as well. It tells me that skills need to be adaptable. You can be working in agriculture and listening to this podcast. That's great. Agriculture today is very different than what it was 100 years ago.

For you working in certain white-collar or even blue-collar skill areas, you need to constantly be looking at what is going to be needed going forward. 1 of the new skills that you need to build on or to build into your portfolio in order to be marketable? When I start recruiting in the early 1970s, there were 2 hot skills-- COBOL and BAL. OS/COBOL. OS/BAL. DOS/COBOL. DOS/BAL. 4 basic areas that you could recruit for. If you are trying to fill IT positions.

These days, who cares? No one is looking for the skills. There were times when C# and Java developers were incredibly valued; now they become commoditized, becoming the COBOL of the current era. I would expect that the need for people with those particular skills is going to decline.

Regardless of whether I'm right or wrong about that, you need to think in terms of what's going to cause you to be marketable going forward. You need to constantly be adapting to the new realities.

"I don't want to do that.
'
That's the reality of things. Markets are dynamic. Firms needs are dynamic. You want to place your self in the position, like those people in 2008 and 2009. Who knew that they got laid off, they could find work easily.

It is going to be another recession. That's the reality of things. You you want to put yourself in the position where your skills are going to be valued in the market.

What's it going to take? What would you need to know? Are you in the peak area now or are you in a tangent area that may not necessarily be marketable? Are you using some obscure technology that may cause you to be marketable? Do you have an obscure skill that a few firms use that make you highly desirable? I don't know, but you need to think this through. You need to take time in order to sort out what you're going to need to know so that if you are laid off, you are not going to be caught short and that you have time to prepare, constantly be looking ahead because you are responsible for your career, not your employer. You're responsible. If you have to write a check, write the check to do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

 

Avoiding Career Management Scams | Job Search Radio

EP 272 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a few warning signs to help you avoid career management scams.

Summary

There are firms out there who are very happy to separate you from your money. There are also firms who do very good work; I'm not going to provide testimonials here. After all, some people tell me they had successes and other people have not. I happen to do coaching, as well. Some people had terrific success with me. I'm sure others would say, "He's okay."

At the end of the day, there are signals that you can look for to know that there are firms that you should avoid like the plague.

For example, if there is a firm that guarantees your results (they guarantee that you get a job),... I'm going to do this life. Jeff Foxworthy would… If there is a career management firm that guarantees that they will find you a job, this is probably a scam.

If they have to have a check right now, this is probably a scam.

If they only have one way of doing things, one package, one price,, one set of service offerings, this is probably a scam.

At the end of the day, you will probably need coaching because you probably been so involved with your work that you haven't really paid attention to how to find work. It's good to have someone who can prod you and push you and encourage you and kick you if you need a kick in the derrière.

Whether you use me (you can find out more about me at www.TheBigGameHunter.us) or you use someone else, I thought I would just give you a couple of warning signs about things to avoid.

At the end of the day, more than anything, get the advice that you need. See if there is a policy where they will refund if you're not happy after a week or so.

See if you can relate to the person that you will be speaking with. Do they seem like the kid in the office who seems like they had been doing this for about an hour or are they a veteran professional?

No matter what, find someone that you're comfortable speaking with who can understand your particular needs and avoid the ones that like I joked about earlier.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

9 Things to Do to Avoid Career Disaster (VIDEO)

Here are things you can do to avoid career disasters.

Summary

Although the US economy is chugging along fueled by low interest rates that have punished savers, the world as a whole is struggling. Whereas in 2008, the US was hemorrhaging jobs, there has been mediocre but consistent job creation occurring. It is nowhere near pre-collapse levels but nonetheless jobs are being created.

Where once job boards were the primary way that people were looking for work, now positioning on LinkedIn is as important if not more so, as well as quality of your professional network.

As one of my guests said in an interview for “Job Search Radio,” 70% of all jobs are found through networking and 70% of those (or 49% of all jobs) are found based upon a relationship that didn’t exist at the beginning of your job search.

When I released my first book, “Get Yourself Hired NOW!” in 2006, branding was an alien concept to job hunters (and to some of you it may still be one) but it is incredibly easy to do given the technology tools that are now available that didn’t exist 10 years ago.

One thing remains true today as it did in 2006. If you’re like most people, you think job hunting is hard, something about as pleasant as going to the dentist or a visit from the Internal Revenue Service. But if I told you that you could earn at least $50,000 or more than you do now over the next five years, would I get your attention (Statistically, it would be easier to earn more than $70000 following a simple strategy)?

In 1972, when I was looking for my first job, I applied for a position at an employment agency. I almost didn’t apply because the ad said, “Management Trainee: Inexperienced Preferred.” In fact, I had no experience and thus was not qualified for anything else. On that day, I stumbled into the field of job hunting and have spent the subsequent years learning how the job hunting system works . . . and doesn’t work.

Since April of 1972, I have spoken to hundreds of thousands of people that I was able to document (more likely, much more), learning from their experiences, successes, and mistakes, and have successfully coached people to use these different strategies to find their next job.

After all, the next recession is on the way. Usually after blow out growth, 7 years is an extremely long period for a recovery. We have passed that threshold and are living on borrowed time.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Here are several things to do in anticipation of a need or desire to look for work.

Write a resume update. When a good opportunity presents itself to you, you can’t wait a week to update yours and then send it to the search firm. By then, they will have gone on to other potential submissions and lock you out of the competition. Every 3-4 months update it. Write a paragraph reviewing your accomplishments during that period. In this way, updating your resume will take no more than 90 minutes instead of scratching your head to remember things.
Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. Resumes are for when you are hunting for an opportunity. LinkedIn is for when you are being hunted. The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. People who get ahead are the ones who remain alert to opportunity.
Cultivate your network. Networking is the most effective way of job hunting. As I said, 49% of positions are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search and 70% all told are filled through networking, out positioning by more than 2-1 to job boards and recruiters. A network, whether in-person or online is cultivated through regular care and feeding. Start reaching out to people you know at least twice a year.
Build a “success brand.” The ability to brand is probably the biggest change that has occurred since I released my first book. There are more places to speak and write to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to audiences locally and worldwide. They require very little time and have a huge potential return.
Read the tea leaves. Every day, there is another story about workers being laid off from major and small companies throughout the world. It is stunning to me that so many of these people were surprised by job cuts. Didn’t they notice no one walking in their store, buying their employer’s products or services or were they just “wishing and hoping” that it might not happen to them?
Practice interviewing regularly. No matter how experienced someone is, interviewing is an acquired skill. The most senior people in the world make stupid mistakes on their interviews saying dumb things that prove costly. Don’t be an amateur. Practice proactively.
Make sure your wardrobe is appropriate for the position you are interviewing for and fits properly. Although this may be a bigger issue with men, both men and women arrive at interviews wearing clothes that are ill-fitting and 2-3 generations old in style, even when wearing “classic styles.” Even the classics go out of style. Even the classics don’t fit properly when you gain weight and stop doing any exercise.
Look out for yourself. Trust me. Your employer really doesn’t care if you live or die. You are hired to be “a team player.” In fact, you are disposable. One of the most accurate statements of this is in the comedy movie, “Back to School.” The last line of the movie is said by Rodney Dangerfield playing the part of the obnoxious but lovable millionaire, Thornton Mellon. He says, “It’s a jungle out there! You gotta look out for number one! Just don’t step in number 2!”
Hire a coach to help you. A relationship with a coach with whom you can sort things out, can help you succeed professionally. Great athletes and entertainers have coaches that bring out their talents and help them succeed. Why do you think you don’t need one? Don’t be a fool and think you have all the answers. Many of you don’t even have the right questions, let alone the right answers.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Whose Career Is This? | Job Search Radio

EP 269 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you about whose career this is anyway.

Summary

Let's talk today about YOUR career. Not your employers view of your career. But YOUR career.

Most people I run into abdicate responsibility for their careers to others. They let employers make decisions about it. They give away their power to the business that is paying the check and wonder why, at the end of the day, they are discarded.

When all is said and done, YOU have to take charge of your career. YOU are responsible for the outcomes that occur and YOU have to make decisions that affected. No one else.

If you abdicate responsibility, you get what you deserve. YOU are supposed to be in charge.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

9 Things to Do To Avoid Career Disasters

Although the US economy is chugging along fueled by low interest rates that have punished savers, the world as a whole is struggling. Whereas in 2008, the US was hemorrhaging jobs, there has been mediocre but consistent job creation occurring. It is nowhere near pre-collapse levels but nonetheless jobs are being created.

Where once job boards were the primary way that people were looking for work, now positioning on LinkedIn is as important if not more so, as well as quality of your professional network.

As one of my guests said in an interview for “Job Search Radio,” 70% of all jobs are found through networking and 70% of those (or 49% of all jobs) are found based upon a relationship that didn’t exist at the beginning of your job search.

When I released my first book, “Get Yourself Hired NOW!” in 2006, branding was an alien concept to job hunters (and to some of you it may still be one) but it is incredibly easy to do given the technology tools that are now available that didn’t exist 10 years ago.

One thing remains true today as it did in 2006. If you’re like most people, you think job hunting is hard, something about as pleasant as going to the dentist or a visit from the Internal Revenue Service. But if I told you that you could earn at least $50,000 or more than you do now over the next five years, would I get your attention (Statistically, it would be easier to earn more than $70000 following a simple strategy)?  

In 1972, when I was looking for my first job, I applied for a position at an employment agency. I almost didn’t apply because the ad said, “Management Trainee: Inexperienced Preferred.” In fact, I had no experience and thus was not qualified for anything else. On that day, I stumbled into the field of job hunting and have spent the subsequent years learning how the job hunting system works . . . and doesn’t work.

Since April of 1972, I have spoken to hundreds of thousands of people that I was able to document (more likely, much more), learning from their experiences, successes, and mistakes, and have successfully coached people to use these different strategies to find their next job.

After all, the next recession is on the way. Usually after blow out growth, 7 years is an extremely long period for a recovery. We have passed that threshold and are living on borrowed time.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Here are several things to do in anticipation of a need or desire to look for work.

  1. Write a resume update. When a good opportunity presents itself to you, you can’t wait a week to update yours and then send it to the search firm. By then, they will have gone on to other potential submissions and lock you out of the competition. Every 3-4 months update it. Write a paragraph reviewing your accomplishments during that period. In this way, updating your resume will take no more than 90 minutes instead of scratching your head to remember things.
  2. Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. Resumes are for when you are hunting for an opportunity. LinkedIn is for when you are being hunted. The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. People who get ahead are the ones who remain alert to opportunity.
  3. Cultivate your network. Networking is the most effective way of job hunting. As I said, 49% of positions are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search and 70% all told are filled through networking, out positioning by more than 2-1 to job boards and recruiters. A network, whether in-person or online is cultivated through regular care and feeding. Start reaching out to people you know at least twice a year.
  4. Build a “success brand.” The ability to brand is probably the biggest change that has occurred since I released my first book. There are more places to speak and write to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to audiences locally and worldwide. They require very little time and have a huge potential return.
  5. Read the tea leaves. Every day, there is another story about workers being laid off from major and small companies throughout the world. It is stunning to me that so many of these people were surprised by job cuts. Didn’t they notice no one walking in their store, buying their employer’s products or services or were they just “wishing and hoping” that it might not happen to them?
  6. Practice interviewing regularly. No matter how experienced someone is, interviewing is an acquired skill. The most senior people in the world make stupid mistakes on their interviews saying dumb things that prove costly. Don’t be an amateur. Practice proactively.
  7. Make sure your wardrobe is appropriate for the position you are interviewing for and fits properly. Although this may be a bigger issue with men, both men and women arrive at interviews wearing clothes that are ill-fitting and 2-3 generations old in style, even when wearing “classic styles.” Even the classics go out of style. Even the classics don’t fit properly when you gain weight and stop doing any exercise.
  8. Look out for yourself. Trust me. Your employer really doesn’t care if you live or die. You are hired to be “a team player.” In fact, you are disposable. One of the most accurate statements of this is in the comedy movie, “Back to School.” The last line of the movie is said by Rodney Dangerfield playing the part of the obnoxious but lovable millionaire, Thornton Mellon. He says, “It’s a jungle out there! You gotta look out for number one! Just don’t step in number 2!”
  9. Hire a coach to help you. A relationship with a coach with whom you can sort things out, can help you succeed professionally. Great athletes and entertainers have coaches that bring out their talents and help them succeed. Why do you think you don’t need one? Don’t be a fool and think you have all the answers. Many of you don’t even have the right questions, let alone the right answers.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017         

If you want to read another article of mine, read, “The 1 Question Every C-Level Candidate Should Be Asked (And a Lot of Non-C Suite Potential Hires, Too).

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life Jeff Altman, The Big Game Huntercoaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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