10 Career Management Mistakes You May Be Making


Here are 10 things you may be doing that hurt yourself.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Preparing for The Inevitable Layoffs (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you need to do to prepare for that inevitable change in skills employers demand.

Summary

I saw to statistic in the book I was reading that I thought was really interesting. The 1st 1, in 2008 to 2009, when so many millions of Americans were laid off, 2.8 million in 2008, and another few million in 2009, the unemployment rate for individuals earning over $100,000 per year was approximately 1%. What does that tell you?

It tells me that there are experience and skills that firm's value for that compensation level that you need to develop.

The 2nd statistic. When you look back in time, the American population worked primarily in agriculture 100 years ago. 80% of Americans worked in agriculture 100 years ago. Now it is less than 2% who work in agriculture. They feed, not only the United States but a good part of the world as well. It tells me that skills need to be adaptable. You can be working in agriculture and listening to this podcast. That's great. Agriculture today is very different than what it was 100 years ago.

For you working in certain white-collar or even blue-collar skill areas, you need to constantly be looking at what is going to be needed going forward. 1 of the new skills that you need to build on or to build into your portfolio in order to be marketable? When I start recruiting in the early 1970s, there were 2 hot skills-- COBOL and BAL. OS/COBOL. OS/BAL. DOS/COBOL. DOS/BAL. 4 basic areas that you could recruit for. If you are trying to fill IT positions.

These days, who cares? No one is looking for the skills. There were times when C# and Java developers were incredibly valued; now they become commoditized, becoming the COBOL of the current era. I would expect that the need for people with those particular skills is going to decline.

Regardless of whether I'm right or wrong about that, you need to think in terms of what's going to cause you to be marketable going forward. You need to constantly be adapting to the new realities.

"I don't want to do that.
'
That's the reality of things. Markets are dynamic. Firms needs are dynamic. You want to place your self in the position, like those people in 2008 and 2009. Who knew that they got laid off, they could find work easily.

It is going to be another recession. That's the reality of things. You you want to put yourself in the position where your skills are going to be valued in the market.

What's it going to take? What would you need to know? Are you in the peak area now or are you in a tangent area that may not necessarily be marketable? Are you using some obscure technology that may cause you to be marketable? Do you have an obscure skill that a few firms use that make you highly desirable? I don't know, but you need to think this through. You need to take time in order to sort out what you're going to need to know so that if you are laid off, you are not going to be caught short and that you have time to prepare, constantly be looking ahead because you are responsible for your career, not your employer. You're responsible. If you have to write a check, write the check to do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

 

Avoiding Career Management Scams | Job Search Radio

EP 272 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a few warning signs to help you avoid career management scams.

Summary

There are firms out there who are very happy to separate you from your money. There are also firms who do very good work; I'm not going to provide testimonials here. After all, some people tell me they had successes and other people have not. I happen to do coaching, as well. Some people had terrific success with me. I'm sure others would say, "He's okay."

At the end of the day, there are signals that you can look for to know that there are firms that you should avoid like the plague.

For example, if there is a firm that guarantees your results (they guarantee that you get a job),... I'm going to do this life. Jeff Foxworthy would… If there is a career management firm that guarantees that they will find you a job, this is probably a scam.

If they have to have a check right now, this is probably a scam.

If they only have one way of doing things, one package, one price,, one set of service offerings, this is probably a scam.

At the end of the day, you will probably need coaching because you probably been so involved with your work that you haven't really paid attention to how to find work. It's good to have someone who can prod you and push you and encourage you and kick you if you need a kick in the derrière.

Whether you use me (you can find out more about me at www.TheBigGameHunter.us) or you use someone else, I thought I would just give you a couple of warning signs about things to avoid.

At the end of the day, more than anything, get the advice that you need. See if there is a policy where they will refund if you're not happy after a week or so.

See if you can relate to the person that you will be speaking with. Do they seem like the kid in the office who seems like they had been doing this for about an hour or are they a veteran professional?

No matter what, find someone that you're comfortable speaking with who can understand your particular needs and avoid the ones that like I joked about earlier.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

9 Things to Do to Avoid Career Disaster (VIDEO)

Here are things you can do to avoid career disasters.

Summary

Although the US economy is chugging along fueled by low interest rates that have punished savers, the world as a whole is struggling. Whereas in 2008, the US was hemorrhaging jobs, there has been mediocre but consistent job creation occurring. It is nowhere near pre-collapse levels but nonetheless jobs are being created.

Where once job boards were the primary way that people were looking for work, now positioning on LinkedIn is as important if not more so, as well as quality of your professional network.

As one of my guests said in an interview for “Job Search Radio,” 70% of all jobs are found through networking and 70% of those (or 49% of all jobs) are found based upon a relationship that didn’t exist at the beginning of your job search.

When I released my first book, “Get Yourself Hired NOW!” in 2006, branding was an alien concept to job hunters (and to some of you it may still be one) but it is incredibly easy to do given the technology tools that are now available that didn’t exist 10 years ago.

One thing remains true today as it did in 2006. If you’re like most people, you think job hunting is hard, something about as pleasant as going to the dentist or a visit from the Internal Revenue Service. But if I told you that you could earn at least $50,000 or more than you do now over the next five years, would I get your attention (Statistically, it would be easier to earn more than $70000 following a simple strategy)?

In 1972, when I was looking for my first job, I applied for a position at an employment agency. I almost didn’t apply because the ad said, “Management Trainee: Inexperienced Preferred.” In fact, I had no experience and thus was not qualified for anything else. On that day, I stumbled into the field of job hunting and have spent the subsequent years learning how the job hunting system works . . . and doesn’t work.

Since April of 1972, I have spoken to hundreds of thousands of people that I was able to document (more likely, much more), learning from their experiences, successes, and mistakes, and have successfully coached people to use these different strategies to find their next job.

After all, the next recession is on the way. Usually after blow out growth, 7 years is an extremely long period for a recovery. We have passed that threshold and are living on borrowed time.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Here are several things to do in anticipation of a need or desire to look for work.

Write a resume update. When a good opportunity presents itself to you, you can’t wait a week to update yours and then send it to the search firm. By then, they will have gone on to other potential submissions and lock you out of the competition. Every 3-4 months update it. Write a paragraph reviewing your accomplishments during that period. In this way, updating your resume will take no more than 90 minutes instead of scratching your head to remember things.
Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. Resumes are for when you are hunting for an opportunity. LinkedIn is for when you are being hunted. The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. People who get ahead are the ones who remain alert to opportunity.
Cultivate your network. Networking is the most effective way of job hunting. As I said, 49% of positions are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search and 70% all told are filled through networking, out positioning by more than 2-1 to job boards and recruiters. A network, whether in-person or online is cultivated through regular care and feeding. Start reaching out to people you know at least twice a year.
Build a “success brand.” The ability to brand is probably the biggest change that has occurred since I released my first book. There are more places to speak and write to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to audiences locally and worldwide. They require very little time and have a huge potential return.
Read the tea leaves. Every day, there is another story about workers being laid off from major and small companies throughout the world. It is stunning to me that so many of these people were surprised by job cuts. Didn’t they notice no one walking in their store, buying their employer’s products or services or were they just “wishing and hoping” that it might not happen to them?
Practice interviewing regularly. No matter how experienced someone is, interviewing is an acquired skill. The most senior people in the world make stupid mistakes on their interviews saying dumb things that prove costly. Don’t be an amateur. Practice proactively.
Make sure your wardrobe is appropriate for the position you are interviewing for and fits properly. Although this may be a bigger issue with men, both men and women arrive at interviews wearing clothes that are ill-fitting and 2-3 generations old in style, even when wearing “classic styles.” Even the classics go out of style. Even the classics don’t fit properly when you gain weight and stop doing any exercise.
Look out for yourself. Trust me. Your employer really doesn’t care if you live or die. You are hired to be “a team player.” In fact, you are disposable. One of the most accurate statements of this is in the comedy movie, “Back to School.” The last line of the movie is said by Rodney Dangerfield playing the part of the obnoxious but lovable millionaire, Thornton Mellon. He says, “It’s a jungle out there! You gotta look out for number one! Just don’t step in number 2!”
Hire a coach to help you. A relationship with a coach with whom you can sort things out, can help you succeed professionally. Great athletes and entertainers have coaches that bring out their talents and help them succeed. Why do you think you don’t need one? Don’t be a fool and think you have all the answers. Many of you don’t even have the right questions, let alone the right answers.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Whose Career Is This? | Job Search Radio

EP 269 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you about whose career this is anyway.

Summary

Let's talk today about YOUR career. Not your employers view of your career. But YOUR career.

Most people I run into abdicate responsibility for their careers to others. They let employers make decisions about it. They give away their power to the business that is paying the check and wonder why, at the end of the day, they are discarded.

When all is said and done, YOU have to take charge of your career. YOU are responsible for the outcomes that occur and YOU have to make decisions that affected. No one else.

If you abdicate responsibility, you get what you deserve. YOU are supposed to be in charge.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

9 Things to Do To Avoid Career Disasters

Although the US economy is chugging along fueled by low interest rates that have punished savers, the world as a whole is struggling. Whereas in 2008, the US was hemorrhaging jobs, there has been mediocre but consistent job creation occurring. It is nowhere near pre-collapse levels but nonetheless jobs are being created.

Where once job boards were the primary way that people were looking for work, now positioning on LinkedIn is as important if not more so, as well as quality of your professional network.

As one of my guests said in an interview for “Job Search Radio,” 70% of all jobs are found through networking and 70% of those (or 49% of all jobs) are found based upon a relationship that didn’t exist at the beginning of your job search.

When I released my first book, “Get Yourself Hired NOW!” in 2006, branding was an alien concept to job hunters (and to some of you it may still be one) but it is incredibly easy to do given the technology tools that are now available that didn’t exist 10 years ago.

One thing remains true today as it did in 2006. If you’re like most people, you think job hunting is hard, something about as pleasant as going to the dentist or a visit from the Internal Revenue Service. But if I told you that you could earn at least $50,000 or more than you do now over the next five years, would I get your attention (Statistically, it would be easier to earn more than $70000 following a simple strategy)?  

In 1972, when I was looking for my first job, I applied for a position at an employment agency. I almost didn’t apply because the ad said, “Management Trainee: Inexperienced Preferred.” In fact, I had no experience and thus was not qualified for anything else. On that day, I stumbled into the field of job hunting and have spent the subsequent years learning how the job hunting system works . . . and doesn’t work.

Since April of 1972, I have spoken to hundreds of thousands of people that I was able to document (more likely, much more), learning from their experiences, successes, and mistakes, and have successfully coached people to use these different strategies to find their next job.

After all, the next recession is on the way. Usually after blow out growth, 7 years is an extremely long period for a recovery. We have passed that threshold and are living on borrowed time.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Here are several things to do in anticipation of a need or desire to look for work.

  1. Write a resume update. When a good opportunity presents itself to you, you can’t wait a week to update yours and then send it to the search firm. By then, they will have gone on to other potential submissions and lock you out of the competition. Every 3-4 months update it. Write a paragraph reviewing your accomplishments during that period. In this way, updating your resume will take no more than 90 minutes instead of scratching your head to remember things.
  2. Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. Resumes are for when you are hunting for an opportunity. LinkedIn is for when you are being hunted. The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. People who get ahead are the ones who remain alert to opportunity.
  3. Cultivate your network. Networking is the most effective way of job hunting. As I said, 49% of positions are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search and 70% all told are filled through networking, out positioning by more than 2-1 to job boards and recruiters. A network, whether in-person or online is cultivated through regular care and feeding. Start reaching out to people you know at least twice a year.
  4. Build a “success brand.” The ability to brand is probably the biggest change that has occurred since I released my first book. There are more places to speak and write to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to audiences locally and worldwide. They require very little time and have a huge potential return.
  5. Read the tea leaves. Every day, there is another story about workers being laid off from major and small companies throughout the world. It is stunning to me that so many of these people were surprised by job cuts. Didn’t they notice no one walking in their store, buying their employer’s products or services or were they just “wishing and hoping” that it might not happen to them?
  6. Practice interviewing regularly. No matter how experienced someone is, interviewing is an acquired skill. The most senior people in the world make stupid mistakes on their interviews saying dumb things that prove costly. Don’t be an amateur. Practice proactively.
  7. Make sure your wardrobe is appropriate for the position you are interviewing for and fits properly. Although this may be a bigger issue with men, both men and women arrive at interviews wearing clothes that are ill-fitting and 2-3 generations old in style, even when wearing “classic styles.” Even the classics go out of style. Even the classics don’t fit properly when you gain weight and stop doing any exercise.
  8. Look out for yourself. Trust me. Your employer really doesn’t care if you live or die. You are hired to be “a team player.” In fact, you are disposable. One of the most accurate statements of this is in the comedy movie, “Back to School.” The last line of the movie is said by Rodney Dangerfield playing the part of the obnoxious but lovable millionaire, Thornton Mellon. He says, “It’s a jungle out there! You gotta look out for number one! Just don’t step in number 2!”
  9. Hire a coach to help you. A relationship with a coach with whom you can sort things out, can help you succeed professionally. Great athletes and entertainers have coaches that bring out their talents and help them succeed. Why do you think you don’t need one? Don’t be a fool and think you have all the answers. Many of you don’t even have the right questions, let alone the right answers.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017         

If you want to read another article of mine, read, “The 1 Question Every C-Level Candidate Should Be Asked (And a Lot of Non-C Suite Potential Hires, Too).

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life Jeff Altman, The Big Game Huntercoaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Most Successful Career Strategy (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an attitude that you need to employ in order to be successful in your career.

 

Summary

I wanted to speak with you today about the most successful career strategy that you can employ.

Most job hunters, most professionals, most employees of companies joining like sheepdogs. You come to work at companies, you have that happy glow and feel good about the opportunity. You are dedicated and committed to the organization. You give it your all!

Here is one problem. I'm going to use an analogy from dating. What you have done is fall in love too soon. As a matter of fact you have fallen in love which isn't the best strategy to take with an employer because they are dispassionate. As much as your manager may tell you that you are fabulous and wonderful, it is a placebo that corporations get out that cost them nothing and causes you to feel good about yourself.

The reality is that when times get tough, you are gone or at risk of being gone, no matter how great a job you have done. This is true whether you're at the staff level or at a leadership level. The risk that you experience is enormous.

You have to look at your career as a consultant would. After all, it's not like you going to be able to go to work there when you're 20 and stay there until retirement age, right? You know that already! The days of the gold watch are gone.

It doesn't matter whether you are on private sector or government. With the new president, government workers feel at risk because he is spoken frequently about spending for government employees. Whether they are fighting back or not, they feel threatened. Thus, they feel at risk for whether their job is safe.

Private sector workers have gone through cycles of that. Certainly, in 2008 and before that in 2001, private sector workers got obliterated before they eventually came back and started working again.

If you are thinking of a career strategy, the issue comes down to what you give your power away to someone who doesn't really care and who only looks out for their interest of times get a little bit difficult? No! It makes no sense to do that! It's like being in a relationship, going out on one date and saying, "I love you.!" The other person then say it's with some amount of exasperation, "Okay. Okay. Umm. I have strong feelings for you, to." They are not as committed or is engaged as you are. An employer wants to see that level of commitment as part of the hiring process and you have to presented in a way that is believable.

Interviewing is theater. This is part of the theater, you have to use; you can't fall prey to their desire to get you emotionally engaged when they are only going to come back and hurt you later on.

Instead, think as a consultant would. I have a job to do. I'm going to do a great job. I'm going to get paid fairly for it. At the end of that work. If you have more than I'm going to find interesting and will pay me well for, fabulous! I love that! If you want to give me a promotion, TERRIFIC! I will make more money – – SUPER! I need to see work that makes sense for me and my objectives.

It's like I've said in another video, is like being the chairman of the board of your own Corporation. Your family, your wife, husband, partner, kids – – they are the shareholders, but you are in charge. In taking that kind of approach, you have a degree of detachment and objectivity about the treatment that you received from your manager and coworkers and from your employer.

You look at the work that you're doing with objective eyes. After all, they may say, "We have this very important project and you're going to be on it for the next 2 years. It's really important to us. We know it's not real interesting and your mind will turn to mush, but we need you to do it."

At the end of 2 years, you are at risk of being thrown out because they don't need you anymore. Often, these kind of special projects are particularly marketable to anyone other than your current employer. Your career has been destroyed all because you said yes to something you shouldn't have said yes to.

Again, my advice is to act like a consultant and be the chairman of your business. Look at things with critical eyes and decide whether it makes sense for you and your career. Don't give away your heart. Don't give away your power. Don't give away your ability to say, "No" and take on things that make no sense and put your career at risk.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Asking Your Manager if Your Job Is Safe (VIDEO)

From The Archives

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice for people who are worried about their jobs

 

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about those times in your career when you are hearing about the potential for layoffs.

Often, when John Hunter started thinking about job hunting, it's because there are some rumors going on in their offices. They are hearing "stuff." There is the grapevine going on. There are going to be job cuts occurring. Suddenly, people start talking to one another. It becomes a situation of the blind leading the blind.

Sometimes, there is the brave soul who has the courage to talk to their boss or manager. They asked them, "Hey! It is my job safe? Do I have anything to worry about? What do you think?"

95 times out of 100, what the manager tells them, "There is nothing to worry about. You are very important to us. Really. Don't worry about it."

When you stop and think about it, that manager doesn't know anything more than the subordinate does is coming to talk to them. That manager is so far down the ladder on a low wrong that all they are trying to do is hold that employee in place. They don't have any more information that the employee does.

Let's stop kidding ourselves. Let's start by analyzing.

Frankly, if you have reason to worry, there is a bigger problem that is going on. Your firm is struggling. You are reading about it in the press. Everyone is cutting back on jobs. Why would you put up with that?

Instead of waiting passively to see if the shoe will drop, put yourself in the position to be found. Put yourself in the position where your profile is up to date on LinkedIn where you might have your resume on a job order two. Where you are starting to network with some people, maybe a former manager of yours who is at another organization that may be in better shape than yours.

Connect with them. Talk with them. Get a feel from them about what's going on at their office. Maybe, there is a place for you at their firm.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Leadership Lessons from The Presidential Election (VIDEO)


When you look at the last few Presidential elections, there is a major leadership lesson that we can learn from the candidates.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about a leadership lesson that came out the last presidential election and, I must, in all honesty, say, many of the ones before that where Pres. Obama ran for office. It's the notion of, not just simply managing for results but creating a dream or a vision for your supporters to rally around and how you can apply that in your professional life as well.

Let's start by looking at the 2008 election. "Yes, we can." Pres. Obama as Sen. Obama ran and inspired campaign. As he spoke from the dais, he addressed audiences as a preacher would. He had that cadence and it was called attention to on numerous occasions to help people rally around him and his inspirational message.

We fast forward to 2012 and is back campaigning again. Yes, he is a record he is campaigning on but, whether you like his policies or not, that's not what this video is about. It's about the notion of rallying people to envision greater than their current life and about a potential. Running against Gov. Romney was like running against the manager for Pres. Obama. Managers don't inspire, even though they may be very solid and very capable. In contrast, the inspirational presentation of Pres. Obama was far stronger than the extreme capability that Romney portrayed.

Let's fast-forward to 2016 and the race between Secretary of State Clinton and her message of, "I'm with Her" running against Donald Trump's message of "Make America Great Again."

Sec. Clinton, of course, rally huge support. Both she and Pres. Trump rallied support around the notion of an enemy. There was a common enemy that they were running against. Candidate Trump campaigned against the entrenched elite that doesn't really care about you; Sec. Clinton ran against a myriad number of gaffes and things that might cause people to be terrified of the notion of a Pres. Trump.

As a record this is new into his administration and of course have no idea how things will turn out; I hope it turns out well and I also know that many people are fearful. Again, this is not what this is about.

It is about taking the lessons of these campaigns and applying them to your professional career. How can you, as someone who aspires to leadership or who is a leader being inspirational figure for your organization and the people who work for it?

How can you is someone who leads, not just simply manage, cause people to feel inspired and give their all his people did for Sen. Obama when he ran for the presidency in 2008? I'm not aware the same devotion to Sec. Clinton as existed with Sen. Obama.

Again, it is not about politics but about how people are inspired by a message at that time and, again, inspired by the Trump message. He obviously did not win the popular vote;m he won the electoral college and is now the president. You may not resonate with his message, but enough people in the right places did.

What message can you offer individuals do want to give their all and join you?

That's the real lesson in all of this. What message would inspire your forces/the people who work for you? That's what you should take away.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

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Believing the BS | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 596 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter debunks one of the career myths we all act as though we believe.

Summary

I have made mistakes in my career; I suspect the same is true of you, too.

Just to talk about career mistakes of my own, for quite a few years I worked for agencies for long spans of time. Invariably, what happened, was that we got to a point where management start the blame staff pretty regularly because they weren't perfect.

There are a variety of things that happened. For example, at the last agency I worked with, what would happen is the owner would cut back on tools and resources and we had less support to help us. We did more "stuff" and we weren't getting the same results as we were used to getting what we had more of those assets. At a previous firm, we had an owner that, in my opinion, was "nuts" at times. He will become psychologically abusive to the staff. Staff will become sufficiently frustrated but, kind of like an abused spouse, we hung in there because we were all making a living until we weren't. 9/11 happened and Noah can make a living in the aftermath.

When all is said and done, you look at your own circumstances. Many of us focus in on our immediate comfort and try to make things work because we have grown up to believe you go to work for company, you work your way up the ranks, you achieve a modicum of success, and, invariably, things will work out.

Let me let you in on a secret. Even at the biggest firms, particularly at the biggest firms, the ones we've all been propagandized to believe are the bastions of stability, there is no stability whatsoever. All the major banks laid off during the last recession. All the major manufacturers label substantial numbers of people. Every industry, every organization of any size or substance laid staff off.

What stability was there?

Zero.

But we all believed that we go to work for company, work hard, you get ahead, you work your way up through the ranks. It isn't true. When times get tough, business now, unlike what they did in the 1950s, does what's right for management and shareholders and lets people go in order to survive or last through the storm. I'm not being critical of them. I'm being critical of those of us who believe that working for a large firm means stability.

The only stability that exists is the stability that exists with having the skills and experiences that are desirable. And, I have had this in, learning the skills needed to find a job, different than the skills needed to do a job.

Again, catch that one. Learning the skills needed to find the job different than the skills needed to do a job. Putting yourself in the position to be found. Having desirable expertise. Marketing yourself, or just simply when you are looking for work, but uniformly. It's not like suddenly companies market their toilet paper, for example, on Tuesdays. They are out there marketing all the time. You have to be marketing all the time.

You want to be practicing and rehearsing how to respond if the phone rings and there is a recruiter on the line. Most importantly, you have to break the cycle of BS that you've been brought up to believe and have internalized to believe that you go to work for company and work your way up through the ranks. The fact is, in this economy, in this new economy that has gone into place, I'm not exactly sure whether it was in 2001 in the post 9/11 era or after the economic collapse in 2008… It doesn't matter. The way we are now is that business wants to hire disposable people who they can get rid of at times where it is inconvenient.

You have to think of it in the same way. If they are going to get rid of you, what will the next firm be looking for that you can sell to them? What will make you attracted to the next firm apart from all your competition? What makes you unique? What makes you special? What makes you someone that they want to hire?

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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