The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/04/the-easiest-way-to-negotiate-a-higher-salary-for-yourself/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Starting a Negotiation with Yes (VIDEO)


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
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It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Advice from a Hostage Negotiator (VIDEO)


Have you ever been in the situation where someone you negotiating with suddenly changes their position? Chris Voss has and here I provide you with two tactics to use when you are confronted with this.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast today where Chris Voss was being interviewed. Chris is a former FBI hostage lead negotiator. I can't say he's a tough guy; I never met him but he has certainly stepped into some interesting situations.

He was talking about situations where people wind up dealing with someone who suddenly changes their positions. It is obviously talking about hostage negotiation, but it could be interesting if your job hunter or an employer who changes their position on something. Your employer and a job hunter comes back with something that is a new demand or request. The third circumstance occurs when your business and your selling something; a person who you are selling something to suddenly change their minds or position about it. You're trying to recapture the situation.

Voss came up with a great response to that. Actually, there are two of them that I really liked. The first one requires that you are imagining that your job hunter or an employer who is suddenly talking with you about different money or your employer and now they're countering with more money. Here's is a response:

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." BOING!!! How. Do you respond to that if your employer who is being told that by a job hunter , because your issuing or about to issue a lower job offer after leading them to believe that you are going to get a higher number? If her employer dealing with the job hunter, can you imagine throwing that one into the mix when a job hunters trying to up the offer?

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." WOW!

Then, of course, let's say were talking from the employer perspective, you have a job hunter who is suddenly issuing a counter demand and, before you hit the first response, you can always try this one… Ready?

"How am I supposed to do that?" You say it in a kind of flat neutral slow FM radio kind of voice and, lo and behold, it's kind of a shocking moment for them that kind of takes it out of their equilibrium because most of them have summoned up their courage in order to make this demand and what you're trying to do is the equivalent of a pattern interrupt.

The first one I really love – – "Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." You say in a very neutral way with a flat affect, no pressure, a very simple statement. I think that hit themselves in the head with the impact of that message that you're sending to them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Play to Their Emotions, Too | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not only use logic when you get into a negotiation with a potential hire AND he proves it, too.

Summary

This is 1 of the hardest lessons to get but I can prove it to you. There is the lesson: it's not facts that always win the day. It is emotions that do. Let me prove it to you.

For those of you who smoke and those of you who are smokers,, factually, you know smoking isn't healthy for you,, right? You know, at some point that if you continue to smoke, where you going to put yourself in a situation where you will suffer a lot,, your health is going to suffer tremendously and maybe smoking or the impact of smoking will kill you.These are the facts. Yet millions of people, tens of millions of people continue to smoke. Why when that same lesson extend itself to a salary make a salary negotiation?

With a third-party recruiter or corporate recruiter, we spend a lot of time with the factual element of why someone should take a job.. We spend less time with the emotional element and we need to shift that's. Were not committed persuade some of the take $20,000 less by dealing with their emotions. The likelihood of that is very slim. For most middle-management professionals.

However, you can entice them to join if your own offer is close to ideal by talking with them about their relationship with the manager.. This is true, particularly after the interview.. If the manager does things that cause candidates to enjoy them, to have fun with them. If you think this is only stuff that works with startup firms,, let me correct you. This works with any organization.

The hiring manager has a key role in the salary negotiation, not because he or she is negotiating it, but because they are creating an image in the candidate's mind of being someone Who they will want to work for. Because they're fun, upbeat,, they are someone that they can learn a lot from while they are doing this job. You need to impress upon these hiring managers their contribution to the hire. That's because in this way, when you get down to the close, you can spend time on the emotional aspects of this and not just on the factual ones.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

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Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Another Salary Negotiation Tactic | Job Search Radio

There are easy ways and hard ways to negotiate . . . and ones in the middle. This one is a mid-to easy way.

 

Summary

I am here today to give you another tactic for salary negotiation. I have published a lot of them as videos; the reason I publish a lot, is because each of you has a different ability to tolerate the stress of the negotiation. Some of you want what I call the easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself; some are open to the 2nd easiest way; some people really want to get in there and fight. There are also lots of different gradients between those extremes.

Here is 1 of those midrange options that I think is very helpful.

The 1st thing is that if the firm wants you to fill out an application, leave the salary area blank. If you need to scribble something, do so but generally leave it blank. When they verbally ask you, "I noticed this was blank in your application (they know what you're doing), How much are you making now/how much you looking for?" You basically respond by saying, "I'm much more interested in the nature of the work. I will be doing for your firm than I am a specific number. So, no, I'm not going to take $14,000 per year, but I would expect you to be reasonable with your job offer."

From they are, some firms are going to go and take a 2nd stab at this. They will say something along the lines of, "you know… I need a number here." You can respond by saying, "I will consider any reasonable offer."

What this does is stall. If they go at it again, "I don't know how I could be more clear. I would consider any reasonable offer."

Once they have made the offer, assuming that this worked ... By the way, I forgot to mention one thing. If it doesn't work, you've learned something about the firm. You've learned that they just have to "break you shoes. Open I didn't want to use a male anatomical part there)." They are there to break you down so that you can form.

Particularly if you are in sales and marketing, never ever conceded this point. What are you saying about yourself as a salesperson? As a matter of fact, after you have given the answer the 1st time (What's really important to me is the nature of the work in the product and service) what you want to be doing if they come at you again is to say something along the lines of, "hey, look, if I made it easy for you, you would question my ability as a salesperson, right. What my job here is to give you a sense of who I am and what I'm capable of, what my achievements of been and what I can do for you. I asked that I be treated fairly and let's move on here."

Again, if they push you, it tells you something. They really want you to operate. "In a square box." You don't want to work for a firm that you can find you in such a way (in my opinion).

Here's the fun thing to do once you get the offer. Ready? This 1 I love.

I want you to pause for a second, "were going to be making you an offer. We really want you to come on board. The seller part of the offers a base of $120,000. " Then they start laying out the additional percentages.

I want you to turn around and go (Particularly if you are the sales), "120. Hmmm. " What that does is let them know that the number isn't quite right, and opens up the conversation for negotiation. From there, you can follow up with data that you have gotten from various sources about what someone with your background should be earning in a role like this.

You can always except the 120 and all the other stuff And after you've done the salary, you cannot go at all the other conditions and benefits, too. Whatever the percentages are on top of the base, start trying to negotiate those as well. Start at the salary number just by repeating it back because with that does is give them the idea that you are comfortable saying yes and that is a subject for negotiation that they want to enter into with you.

So, again, another approach, another way of doing a negotiation that I hope you can execute

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation?


There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

 

Summary

I was asked, “How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?”

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn’t been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

  1. As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
  2. This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
  3. You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, “What’s the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?”
  4. They just don’t care.  There’s no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it’s not like you’re the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.

Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, “Are you okay?”  The message may read something along the lines of, “I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven’t heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right.”

That will usually “guilt them” into surfacing.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Negotiating Strategy Few Use

 

I discuss the mistake too many people

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

 

 

Advice from The Godfather” About Negotiating Salary

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses a memorable quote from “The Godfather”to offer advice about salary negotiation.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

 

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