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Preparing and Practicing Your End Game


Finding a job is like a chess match where everyone spends time practicing their opening gambit but no time practicing their end game. In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to also spend time practicing and preparing your end game.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that they focus all their attention on the opening. It's kind of like chess. You focus on your opening gambit but don't spend a lot of time practicing your endgame.

The opening gambit is writing the resume, how to interview, maybe, how to second interview.But you don't really but you don't really work on the parts of the game related to salary negotiation, maybe resigning her position in a good way so that you don't burn the bridges. Particularly salary negotiations a weak spot for most people.

The result winds up being you leave money on the table, maybe burn a bridge behind you with your current employer that makes it harder for you to get a great reference when you needed in the future.

And you know you're going to need it in the future, right? This job is going to last until the hinge of the gold watch, right? What their huge were gold watch.

When all is said and done, you need to spend some time practicing your endgame in salary negotiation, too. Getting advice about how to negotiate salary and how to resign your job well.

I have tons of videos on the subjects, but a video isn't that the same as spending time with an expert and learning how to do it well at the right time. Yes, I will coach you on how to do a salary negotiation. I provide that service. I'll prepare you for it, prepare you, even if they've made the offer to you and your trying to "finesse them" into upping the money. .. I can't work miracles , but I've helped a lot of people get more money in all the salary negotiations that I've done it all those coaching sessions I've done.

I'll simply say don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame and not just simply her opening. It really is like chess and, at the end of the day, don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame not just simply your opening.It really is like a chess match. Remember, if you leave yourself in a position where you are boxed in, iit will be hard to win.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Question You’re Forgetting to Ask When Negotiating (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I do a lot of videos and podcasts about negotiating. People forget to ask questions when negotiating. Here’s the big one they forget they ask.

Summary

I have done a lot of videos about negotiating that you can watch on YouTube. They are incredibly helpful. I also want to point out that if you're going into a negotiation, the negotiations started WAY before. People have been asking you questions about what you would do if . . How you would handle that. There is a lot of preliminary stuff that occurs very subtly before you actually enter into a negotiation.

For example, if you are speaking to a recruiter, either corporate or third-party they are asking you how much you were looking for, how much you are earning now . . . They are getting a feel for whether you fall into the parameters of what they are willing to pay just by asking those questions. It is part of the negotiation. They may ask you, "What is the rock-bottom base salary, exclusive of bonus, that you would find acceptable to join a firm like ours? What they are doing is negotiating.

Here is the question that you are forgetting to ask. It's a really important one for them to hear because you want to let them know that they are not to put one over on you. It is not a "tough question." It is not "an aggressive question." It is however the right question to make them start to explain themselves. When firms, when recruiters, are asked to explain, you begin to understand how plausible they are. You begin to understand whether they are being sincere or manipulative.

Here's the question: "Why do you want to know that?" If they are asking about what you are looking for you can say something to the effect of, "I am looking for a salary range of such and such. I want to be clear that in the course of our interviews, is certainly possible that other firms will come in the salary range higher than that. However, for now, as I understand the position, this is the range that I am looking for."

When they ask you during the obvious negotiation when you been on a few interviews and you believe that they are going to be making you an offer, and they are asking about that, "rock-bottom salary," asked them, "Why do you want to know that?"

"WE WANT TO GET YOU FOR THE LOWEST AMOUNT O MONEY, that's why we want to know that!"

"Why do you want to know that? I have situations going on with other firms that are from more than what we are talking about but I'm really interested in this role. I'm curious why do you want to know that?"

Do a sound threatening in any way? I don't think I do. What I'm trying to do is make them talk. I gave them that little thing about, "Other firms are talking with me about more than what we talked about before, but it really interested in this opportunity. I'm curious. Why do you want to know about the least amount it would take?"
"

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Signal They Can Get You (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

It is very easy to overplay your hand when a firm asks you, “So, what you have going on,” and make them believe that they have no chance of getting you. There is a different approach.

Summary

Because my career executive search, I spent a lot of time talking with people who are negotiating. In creating suddenly content, like podcasts, videos and such, I will offer some strategies and opinions about how to do it well. This 1 I haven't covered before. This 1 is a really cool one. It deals with the risk some people play by overplaying their hand. Let me give you an example of what I am talking about.

Sometimes, when job hunters are out there and the firm is trying to find out about their interest, there sometimes asked, "So, what you have going on for you?" In their answer, they talk about every firm known to mankind. All the interviews that they been on. All the firms that seem excited about them. Their 4th interviews with this 1, 3rd interviews with that one, 6th interviews with another one . . I should be hearing about an offer from that one tomorrow. What they are doing is overplaying their hand.

Here's what you should do instead and look at it from an employer's perspective. Again, we are not committing you anything here. Not asking you to tell them, "I am going to accept the job offer from you." Here me out. I want you to say, "I have a number of things in various stages of progress. Some are closer than others but I want you to know I'm really interested in your opportunity."

Then they will follow up by saying, "Why is that?" You have to be prepared to talk about the good things that you are seeing in the organization and in the job opportunity.

"1st of all, the person at the working force fabulous. She is a terrific individual. I see her leadership qualities. I think I can learn a lot from (him or her)."

Then, from there, you talk about the nature of the work. Then, you conclude by saying, "Obviously, everything has to align properly. I'm not going to take the lowest offer just for this job opportunity because, at the end of the day, have to be properly am I want to make sure my children are well cared for. But I really like this job!"

Did you notice my little theater in their? I being exuberant and how I'm speaking about the job. "I really interested in this job!" You change your voice a little bit while expressing your interest. But you also told them that you are not going to take a bad offer, right?

What you want to do is signal your interest, signal that they can get you and not talk about the 37 other things that you have going on. After all, when they hear that, they rolled their eyes into the back of their head and think to themselves, "Oh, man! We're never going to get this person." Then they will make the offer for that reason. You talk them out of it because they don't think that they can win.

You have to give them the belief that there's a shot they can get you. That's why your follow-up in answering this question is so important.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Notice the Message Behind The Question When Negotiating


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

There is a message sent with some of the questions and behaviors employers have when negotiating.

Summary

I want to talk with you about depersonalizing some of the things that happen during an interview that involve a negotiation or, for that matter, could involve an interview. No matter which 1 it is, job hunters sometimes get really testy and touchy about employer questions. It is though they never heard the line, " It's business. It's not personal." But they personalize everything. As a result, they become offended rather than looking at things as a negotiating ploy.

So, for example, when a firm is talking with you as a candidate pretty early on and they are trying to get a sense of how much you earn and how much we're looking for, and, if they are unwilling to reveal what they are willing to pay, job hunters take it very personally. "Why won't they tell me? I'm upset. You know I just want to know what the job is going to pay. "

Trust me. They will let you know if they don't want to talk with you again. If they don't see your value all at the price they're willing to pay or they can't pay enough to get you. It's really that simple. So rather than freaking out, very simply understand that they will make decisions based upon what you tell them.

So let's say you get to the offer stage. You made it past the thirty seven rounds and jumped through all the hoops that they wanted you to jump through and they've decided on you. Now they're doing some parameters testing and theQy ask, "Would reconsider a position less than the top range that they told you about?"

"WHAT?". And people get all sorts of indignant! "Why wouldn't they. . .!" They just want to know if you would consider something less.

That's because if they can save five or ten thousand dollars, they're happy to do that and you can just very simply respond by saying "Hey, look. You are bigger entity than I am? In. Is there a problem with paying me the amount that's been spoken about?" Make them defend their position proactively rather than flipping out, rather than getting defensive

If they wind up talking about some other elements of the job that winds up not being to your liking, instead of freaking out let's say they talk about a review policy), let's say they talk about a start date that isn't quite to your liking, a lesser salary, or a different review policy or start date estimate, "hat's different here," and make them explain it to you so you understand. It may not change your reaction but I think going for them explaining goes a lot further than turning your insides out, not knowing what's going on, freaking out, taking all these things as personal insults and affronts and going crazy.

Again it's business. It's not personal. They're not doing it to you. What they're trying to do was negotiate the best deal they can for them. You are experiencing the collateral impact. They're not thinking about you.

Once you try to humanize it by asking questions, it calms you down all lots and it makes them explain/justify why they want you to be flexible.

As a reminder, if you make a concession in some way, go for concessions on their side. An earlier review policy. Better benefits . . . something. Make them concede something.

If they're not willing to do that, there's a message in that for you. It's not personal. It may reflect a rigid structure that they can't defeat which you have to decide whether you are comfortable with. You have to start doing some trade offs in in your mind in order to explain to yourself why you would accommodate them and not accept or not required accommodation for them. Whatever you decide is OK; it's not bad intrinsically. It's part of the bargains in the negotiation that each side engages in.

Again, I encourage people to go for obtaining a reciprocal concession. They make something. It doesn't have to be a big deal. It can just be an extra vacation. They can be an extra personal day where the boss looks the other way and it's not counted. Whatever it is, just look for something in return.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

You Can’t Be Afraid to Negotiate (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

NOTE: In this video, I use an off-color expression

It is very expensive to act like a sheep and just accept what you are told. You can’t be afraid to negotiate.

Summary

This video could be for either employers are job hunters, but would spend more time on it for job hunters. It will cover the premise that you cannot be afraid to negotiate.

I know most people get you emotionally hooked in the process of interviewing. They cast out a line. You put your mouth on the hook. They reel you in. It is really the way that it is.

There is a point where you've invested a lot of time, effort and emotions into interviewing. They may make an offer that is low and you roll your eyes back into your head and you swallow hard and say, "yes," because you don't want to rock the boat.

Or, earlier on in the process, when they are telling you that you are not worth as much money as you think you are, you swallow hard and agree with them and keep going forward.

Everything is a negotiation in the interview process. Everything involves interview posturing for advantage. . . And they have to include agency recruiters in this. After all, third-party contingency recruiters, even executive search firms, everyone is posturing for advantage. It involves creating space in the job hunter's mind, in the employer's mind, for influence-- influence toward the ultimate goal of delivering a person into a job and them staying for a period of time.

For you as the job hunter, you are the ultimate fish here. That's because everyone is telling you that you are doing it wrong yet you have researched (that's really the key here your value from reputable sources. You haven't taken advice from 3 bozo friends of yours who know nothing about the market. ). You have actually done some pay scale research and determined your real value. Thus, when they are telling you that you are not worth it, you are letting it go by.

They might say something like, "Our range is only up to $110,000 or $180,000 or $275,000 or whatever the number is. And they tell you that you are not as strong as they believe warrants paying that number.

"Why are you interviewing me? What makes you come to that evaluation because what I see online and what I see my conversations with people is very different than your opinion. Perhaps, your opinion is incorrect. Because I see my value as being $310,000 or $195,000 or $135,000… Whatever the number is, it is very clear to me that given my numbers of years of experience and how a matchup with this role, it is not money number that is incorrect. It is your number."

You see, what they are trying to tell you is that you are wrong and you need to rethink your position.. Why aren't you turning this around and making it clear to them that perhaps in their opinion is incorrect?

"I'm talking to for other firms at this price point. Know what is batting in high and what I am saying to them. Have you considered that perhaps this number was conceived of (I use a vulgar expression here that translates into "without careful consideration of market realities.").

Don't be afraid. After all, the worst thing that can happen is that you interview someplace else that will give you the money. That place may not have the pretty offices. It may not have this specific team there. They may actually have a nicer set of offices and even better people and appreciation for you that these folks don't have.

Once a firm is trying to collapse your thinking so early, understand, that they're going to keep doing that while you are working there. Is that really what you want? You always want to be value properly and you always want to point out to them that their thinking isn't always correct. You certainly have opinions are worth listening to as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/20/whats-the-first-rule-of-negotiating-a-job-offer-2/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Preparing and Practicing Your End Game | Job Search Radio

Finding a job is like a chess match where everyone spends time practicing their opening gambit but no time practicing their end game. In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to also spend time practicing and preparing your end game.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that they focus all their attention on the opening. It's kind of like chess. You focus on your opening gambit but don't spend a lot of time practicing your endgame.

The opening gambit is writing the resume, how to interview, maybe, how to second interview.But you don't really but you don't really work on the parts of the game related to salary negotiation, maybe resigning her position in a good way so that you don't burn the bridges. Particularly salary negotiations a weak spot for most people.

The result winds up being you leave money on the table, maybe burn a bridge behind you with your current employer that makes it harder for you to get a great reference when you needed in the future.

And you know you're going to need it in the future, right? This job is going to last until the hinge of the gold watch, right? What their huge were gold watch.

When all is said and done, you need to spend some time practicing your endgame in salary negotiation, too. Getting advice about how to negotiate salary and how to resign your job well.

I have tons of videos on the subjects, but a video isn't that the same as spending time with an expert and learning how to do it well at the right time. Yes, I will coach you on how to do a salary negotiation. I provide that service. I'll prepare you for it, prepare you, even if they've made the offer to you and your trying to "finesse them" into upping the money. .. I can't work miracles , but I've helped a lot of people get more money in all the salary negotiations that I've done it all those coaching sessions I've done.

I'll simply say don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame and not just simply her opening. It really is like chess and, at the end of the day, don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame not just simply your opening.It really is like a chess match. Remember, if you leave yourself in a position where you are boxed in, iit will be hard to win.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/04/the-easiest-way-to-negotiate-a-higher-salary-for-yourself/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Starting a Negotiation with Yes (VIDEO)


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
.
It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Advice from a Hostage Negotiator (VIDEO)


Have you ever been in the situation where someone you negotiating with suddenly changes their position? Chris Voss has and here I provide you with two tactics to use when you are confronted with this.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast today where Chris Voss was being interviewed. Chris is a former FBI hostage lead negotiator. I can't say he's a tough guy; I never met him but he has certainly stepped into some interesting situations.

He was talking about situations where people wind up dealing with someone who suddenly changes their positions. It is obviously talking about hostage negotiation, but it could be interesting if your job hunter or an employer who changes their position on something. Your employer and a job hunter comes back with something that is a new demand or request. The third circumstance occurs when your business and your selling something; a person who you are selling something to suddenly change their minds or position about it. You're trying to recapture the situation.

Voss came up with a great response to that. Actually, there are two of them that I really liked. The first one requires that you are imagining that your job hunter or an employer who is suddenly talking with you about different money or your employer and now they're countering with more money. Here's is a response:

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." BOING!!! How. Do you respond to that if your employer who is being told that by a job hunter , because your issuing or about to issue a lower job offer after leading them to believe that you are going to get a higher number? If her employer dealing with the job hunter, can you imagine throwing that one into the mix when a job hunters trying to up the offer?

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." WOW!

Then, of course, let's say were talking from the employer perspective, you have a job hunter who is suddenly issuing a counter demand and, before you hit the first response, you can always try this one… Ready?

"How am I supposed to do that?" You say it in a kind of flat neutral slow FM radio kind of voice and, lo and behold, it's kind of a shocking moment for them that kind of takes it out of their equilibrium because most of them have summoned up their courage in order to make this demand and what you're trying to do is the equivalent of a pattern interrupt.

The first one I really love – – "Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." You say in a very neutral way with a flat affect, no pressure, a very simple statement. I think that hit themselves in the head with the impact of that message that you're sending to them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

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