Preparing and Practicing Your End Game | Job Search Radio

Finding a job is like a chess match where everyone spends time practicing their opening gambit but no time practicing their end game. In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to also spend time practicing and preparing your end game.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that they focus all their attention on the opening. It's kind of like chess. You focus on your opening gambit but don't spend a lot of time practicing your endgame.

The opening gambit is writing the resume, how to interview, maybe, how to second interview.But you don't really but you don't really work on the parts of the game related to salary negotiation, maybe resigning her position in a good way so that you don't burn the bridges. Particularly salary negotiations a weak spot for most people.

The result winds up being you leave money on the table, maybe burn a bridge behind you with your current employer that makes it harder for you to get a great reference when you needed in the future.

And you know you're going to need it in the future, right? This job is going to last until the hinge of the gold watch, right? What their huge were gold watch.

When all is said and done, you need to spend some time practicing your endgame in salary negotiation, too. Getting advice about how to negotiate salary and how to resign your job well.

I have tons of videos on the subjects, but a video isn't that the same as spending time with an expert and learning how to do it well at the right time. Yes, I will coach you on how to do a salary negotiation. I provide that service. I'll prepare you for it, prepare you, even if they've made the offer to you and your trying to "finesse them" into upping the money. .. I can't work miracles , but I've helped a lot of people get more money in all the salary negotiations that I've done it all those coaching sessions I've done.

I'll simply say don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame and not just simply her opening. It really is like chess and, at the end of the day, don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame not just simply your opening.It really is like a chess match. Remember, if you leave yourself in a position where you are boxed in, iit will be hard to win.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/04/the-easiest-way-to-negotiate-a-higher-salary-for-yourself/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Starting a Negotiation with Yes (VIDEO)


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
.
It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Advice from a Hostage Negotiator (VIDEO)


Have you ever been in the situation where someone you negotiating with suddenly changes their position? Chris Voss has and here I provide you with two tactics to use when you are confronted with this.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast today where Chris Voss was being interviewed. Chris is a former FBI hostage lead negotiator. I can't say he's a tough guy; I never met him but he has certainly stepped into some interesting situations.

He was talking about situations where people wind up dealing with someone who suddenly changes their positions. It is obviously talking about hostage negotiation, but it could be interesting if your job hunter or an employer who changes their position on something. Your employer and a job hunter comes back with something that is a new demand or request. The third circumstance occurs when your business and your selling something; a person who you are selling something to suddenly change their minds or position about it. You're trying to recapture the situation.

Voss came up with a great response to that. Actually, there are two of them that I really liked. The first one requires that you are imagining that your job hunter or an employer who is suddenly talking with you about different money or your employer and now they're countering with more money. Here's is a response:

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." BOING!!! How. Do you respond to that if your employer who is being told that by a job hunter , because your issuing or about to issue a lower job offer after leading them to believe that you are going to get a higher number? If her employer dealing with the job hunter, can you imagine throwing that one into the mix when a job hunters trying to up the offer?

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." WOW!

Then, of course, let's say were talking from the employer perspective, you have a job hunter who is suddenly issuing a counter demand and, before you hit the first response, you can always try this one… Ready?

"How am I supposed to do that?" You say it in a kind of flat neutral slow FM radio kind of voice and, lo and behold, it's kind of a shocking moment for them that kind of takes it out of their equilibrium because most of them have summoned up their courage in order to make this demand and what you're trying to do is the equivalent of a pattern interrupt.

The first one I really love – – "Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." You say in a very neutral way with a flat affect, no pressure, a very simple statement. I think that hit themselves in the head with the impact of that message that you're sending to them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Play to Their Emotions, Too | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not only use logic when you get into a negotiation with a potential hire AND he proves it, too.

Summary

This is 1 of the hardest lessons to get but I can prove it to you. There is the lesson: it's not facts that always win the day. It is emotions that do. Let me prove it to you.

For those of you who smoke and those of you who are smokers,, factually, you know smoking isn't healthy for you,, right? You know, at some point that if you continue to smoke, where you going to put yourself in a situation where you will suffer a lot,, your health is going to suffer tremendously and maybe smoking or the impact of smoking will kill you.These are the facts. Yet millions of people, tens of millions of people continue to smoke. Why when that same lesson extend itself to a salary make a salary negotiation?

With a third-party recruiter or corporate recruiter, we spend a lot of time with the factual element of why someone should take a job.. We spend less time with the emotional element and we need to shift that's. Were not committed persuade some of the take $20,000 less by dealing with their emotions. The likelihood of that is very slim. For most middle-management professionals.

However, you can entice them to join if your own offer is close to ideal by talking with them about their relationship with the manager.. This is true, particularly after the interview.. If the manager does things that cause candidates to enjoy them, to have fun with them. If you think this is only stuff that works with startup firms,, let me correct you. This works with any organization.

The hiring manager has a key role in the salary negotiation, not because he or she is negotiating it, but because they are creating an image in the candidate's mind of being someone Who they will want to work for. Because they're fun, upbeat,, they are someone that they can learn a lot from while they are doing this job. You need to impress upon these hiring managers their contribution to the hire. That's because in this way, when you get down to the close, you can spend time on the emotional aspects of this and not just on the factual ones.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

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Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Don’t Fall for Employer Deflections When Discussing Salary (VIDEO)


Employers try a lot of different strategies to “finesse you” when discussing salary.

 

Summary

I wanted to talk with you today about 1 of those employer strategies when they are speaking with you during their interviews, or afterwords that's designed there designed to get you to compromise on money.

1st of all, I want you to think that from the employer's standpoint their goal is to get you for as little as possible and, from your standpoint you are trying to earn as much is possible. Often, what employers will wind up doing is (initially I will say this facetiously) is a variation of, "show me the hand." There show you their hand and do in a way that's designed to talk you down.

For example, they will say, "Oh, the economy is awful!" Or, "We saw this other person. They are really good. We are thinking about you, but they're willing to take less than you." There are lots of these things that employers will say that are designed to "finesse you." They will say things like, "Oh, we're not doing that well. Our quarterly results…"

Here are a few facts. The 1st one is that's their problem. In the case of any other person, number 2 is that if they really think that person is better, they should hire them. If they are the best qualified person for them to hire, that is the right person for them to bring on board. The $5000 more, or the $10,000 more that you are asking for will be made up in the way of productivity, and they would not be raising the subject unless they were thinking favorably of you. They are trying to talk you down.

I'll simply say if they raise the subject of corporate earnings ("Oh! Where having a down quarter this quarter.") you don't really know how much they're making and if this group is one that is going to be cut or the risk of being cut, why would you want to join them anyway? You also really don't know what they're thinking, although I do think the really signaling something to you by having this conversation.

Don't worry about what you're thinking about other people. It's a deflection that's designed to distract you. You always have to be thinking that your value the value you've assessed yourself for, is really the correct value., If you haven't done your research, that's one thing. But I'm working with the assumption that you have.

You have to think positively in terms of how you are presenting yourself and your potential effectiveness. That's because, frankly, if you don't have the value they would be raising. This is the subject. So don't fall for their game.

Instead, state very clearly, if they raise the subject of the other person, "I don't wish to be rude but take a look at my value in the market. On the firm seem to think I'm worth that amount of money and if you think the other person is better, you should hire them. However, if you decide that on the right person for you and frankly, this seems like a great opportunity for me, I just want you to make your strongest offer."

This approach applies to business owners as well.

Have you ever gone into a negotiation where you try to sell a product or service and the buyer basically says something to the effect of, "I have 3 other proposals and to her for less than you."

"Great! You should buy 1 of them if you think that's what's best for you. But, if you're looking for someone who can…" And then you start reselling it.

All these kind of deflections that come up are all designed to "finesse you" into taking less than real value. Don't fall for it. Instead of doing that, stand your ground. Do it in a polite way.

Will it work all the time? No! If you take 10% less, if you accept $5000 less than the real value, who is really hurt?

The hiring manager feels like a hero because they got you for less money. You are the one who has to live with the consequence of the decision. At the end of the day, experience tells me that will eat at your insides and will bother you.

Since future raises are going to be based on what you are currently earning, don't fall for their strategy.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

No BS Coaching Advice

Increasing the Salary Offer | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 600 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an easy to implement strategy for asking a firm to increase their salary offer to you so that you will accept it.

Negotiating is one of the skills job hunters need to improve
Summary

We are going to be talking today about a strategy for firmed up the job offer. I want to be clear – – it doesn't always work. Nothing always works. If you want a guarantee in life, I will give you one guarantee – – you are going to die. That is the only guarantee that exists.

This is an opportunity for you to try upping the job offer and do it in a way where, after you come on board, they'll take it out in your hide. You see, I've been in tough negotiations with people because they have insisted that they squeeze every drop of blood out of my client. What invariably happens is, in a tough negotiation, when the person comes on board, it is taken out on them. There are a lot of different ways; I'm not to go through with describing them.

I simply want to talk about how you can do negotiation without them getting angry at you. Here's a scenario I was helping someone with recently.

At various points, he given me an idea of what he would, except for my clients. He is involved with the relocation to accept this job and the client far exceeded any relocation money that the guy was asking for. The candidate was thrilled about that. However, he missed made a mistake in his calculations about the salary part of the job offer. He forgot to take into consideration the tax differences between the 2 states. So, suddenly, what was an acceptable offer has become a few thousand dollars short.

Here's what I suggested to do. Understand, the client extended the offer to him directly. I am the client to represented him to them but they will be dealing with one another now and in the future. So, yes, I could step in, but I thought it would be best if he handled this because they have been dealing with him directly throughout the interview process and I just think they want to have that relationship with him and he has to reciprocate.

What I suggested that he do is make arrangements to speak with my client and approach them in this matter. Before I go any further, let me explain some of the nuances. I said to him, "Before you call up, slow your speech down. When people speak quickly, is associated with people who 'hustle.' Scam artists. Insincerity. Will be slower speech down, and seem like we are kicking their individual words carefully, it sounds sincere. It is important for you to send sincere."

Then I continued by saying, "what you say to him is as follows, 'when I spoke with Jeff about what I would find acceptable, I told him this number. But, I forgot to take into account that there was a tax difference. I haven't told him about this until today and I just thought I would talk with you directly about this. The difference is (and I told him to quote the specific number). Please understand, I want to join very much. It is a great opportunity. I'm ready to say yes today. Could you increase the number by (and that I suggested that he quote the specific number he was looking for)?'"

What this does make this a person-to-person relationship between the parties. They can hear the sincerity, where they can hear your agony over this, where they can hear that you want to join and that you are prepared to commit today if they increase the offer. That goes a long way in employers playbook because 1 of the things that they hate doing (understand, this happens all the time. People say that they will do one thing and then they do something else. They don't want to do all the work to get approvals to get an offer increase and to then have you turn it down). By hearing your voice and sounding sincere. What you are able to do is be personally persuasive, given the carrot of letting them know that you're ready to say yes if they had that number, and then, from their standpoint, once you get that number, you got the job!

Sincerity. Slowing your speech down. Being clear about what you are looking for. These are huge part of how to up the offer.

You can always hardball people and say, "I made a mistake. I know I said I was looking for. This amount, but I really want this." You can do that and be prepared for firms to say, "You know what? Don't let the door hit you in the butt." And, I will do other shows that will talk about how to do a tough negotiation.

When all is said and done, I think that if you are very close and there is a few thousand dollars difference, sincerity goes a long way toward bringing everything together.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Bad Negotiating | Job Search Radio

There should be a pact between people not to try to do this and respect one another. This is a discussion of bad negotiating

bad-negotiating

SUMMARY

Let me check something out with you.

If you send me a resume and said you made $150,000 and I called you up and we had a detailed interview and I said to you, “Great! Your background looks terrific!  Our client can only pay $130,000. Isn’t that great?”  You would be angry at me, right?  You be angry at me for wasting your time for expecting you. That you would do something that only a fool would do.  Take that big a haircut.  Yet, when people send their resume to me, and my advertising or my outrage or my communication with them, says, “This is the salary level. My client pays and we do the exact same thing in reverse, and you turn around and say, “Well, they should be paying $20,000 more,” after I’ve spent 20 freaking minutes with them, didn’t you read?  Did you see what I communicated?

Why do you waste my time?

This happens all the time. Job hunters think, and consultants. In particular, think that it is okay to go through this game but if you were reversed, “All, terrible, terrible.”

So, I just want to encourage you, be mindful of other people’s time.  Just because you’ve been treated badly in the past doesn’t give you permission to treat others badly.

It’s not like, “Okay, I got the bad experience.  Let me give it to someone else.”  Then they can give it to someone.  No, it is not supposed to work that way.

We all have a responsibility to put into it in our work.  You don’t get a pass because someone treated you badly. I don’t get a pass because someone treated me badly. I still conduct myself as I commit myself to do.  In a forthright and honest way.  Communicate best information wherever possible and saying, “I don’t know. Let me get back to you.

I will do that all the time.  However, I am not going to waste someone’s time with the game like the one I started this podcast with.  Why do you?

I will simply say, that for many of you, you just don’t know that it’s the wrong thing to do.  As a matter of fact, for many of you (I have to say many because I just see how job hunters go about their business), you act as though the skills needed to find a job are not different than the ones needed to do a job.  Most of you are not capable of job hunting.  You find the job by accident.  You go through a lot of trial and error. You learn on the cuff.  You get lucky!  Someone hires you.  You think it’s skill. But, all the way through, you are being shelled through a process that takes you through to this conclusion.

Visit JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.  This is a site where you are able to find information about how to search for work.  It is far better than what you will find in other places.  In addition, you can ask me questions about your search and I have no vested interest in which job you take.  It doesn’t matter to me.  I’m there to help you to the best that you can on your search.

[/spp-transcript]

 

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Advice from “The Godfather” About Negotiating Salary | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses a memorable quote from “The Godfather” to offer advice about salary negotiation.

the-godfather

Summary

I’m back today with more advice from The Godfather about job hunting.  In the movie, it isn’t done a better job hunting. Marlon Brando plays The Godfather, James, Caan plays Place his older son, Sonny. Sonny is a hot tempered guy, very quick. There is a point where Sonny says something about what he is thinking and The Godfather says these words:

“Never tell anyone outside the family what you are thinking again.”

The idea behind this is often, in negotiations, people are asking you, “What do you think about the job?

I think it’s okay to answer them.  With regard to compensation,, you are always best served if you hold back a little bit.  You can say something like, “I’m thinking pretty favorably about this.  I’m hoping this is a high offer.

Avoid giving them a number in the negotiation phase.  Why? Because as soon as you give them a number, that’s the one that they are focused on.  No higher. No lower.  That’s it.

If you have 2 or 3 firms on the hook, then they will start bidding against one another.  You can start playing one off against the other

Recruiters may say something to you like, “Tell me what you are thinking.  What is it going to take to close the deal?”  In all candor, I do this all the time.  What serves you best is if you hold out what that number is problem is going to cause you to say yes.  Sometimes, the character strategy is that the recruiter will come back and lowball you.

You will respond by saying, “What! That is ridiculous!  I would never take an offer like that!”

“What would you take?”

At that point, you start talking about the number and then they’ve got you.

Hold off on talking about specific numbers that will cause you to say yes.  Like The Godfather says,, “Never tell anyone outside the family. What you are thinking.”  What will happen is that’s the only number they are going to be concerned about.  You’re better off if you have multiple situations going and tell them what the other firms are thinking, not what you are thinking.

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

A Cute Salary Negotiation Tip | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a cute tactic he uses when negotiating salary for someone.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about a little salary negotiation tip that came to me a while back. I use it from time to time when working with clients when the candidate is about to get an offer and I am negotiating salary on behalf of the client.

I found an interesting thing.  Every once in a while, instead of using an expected round number that ends in zero or $5000 like $80,000 or $85,000, I pick a different kind of number.

I might say something like, $87,500 or $112,200.

Things that are a little irregular.

Why?

Because it is not a number that they are used to hearing so it gives them reason to think, instead of instantly responding with EA or née.  In those cases, it’s May because firms always try to push down the amount. It is very rare that someone increases the amount.

He gives them reason to hesitate. And, as a result, we get into an actual conversation, rather than knee-jerk reactions.

Try.

That you are asked what salary you are looking for, try saying something like $122,200.

“How did you come up with that number?”

“Well, I did some research on the web.  I took a look at the value for what I do and found that this was the mean for the range that you are looking.”

“What was the range?”

Of course you can come back and say, “$117,000-$125,000 per year.”

When all is said and done, making them hear an unusual number causes them to deal with you differently than everyone else..

Don’t fall into the predictable pattern.  Try doing something a little bit different.

When I’m asked to submit a consultant, I’m asked what rate I charge for the person.  I don’t say, for example, “$100 per hour.”  I will say $”$101.75 per hour for this person.”  He gives me a little room to negotiate, of course.  Again, it is a different kind of valuation then just say $100.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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