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Is It OK to Take a Counteroffer in This Case?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/20/is-it-ok-to-take-a-counteroffer-in-this-case/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

”Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

what are you tolerating?

What Are You Tolerating? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Summary

I was doing a coaching call yesterday with someone and we got to a point in our conversation where he said something wonderful. What he said (and I think it is very relevant for you as a job hunter), he asked himself the question, "What am I tolerating?" I asked the question of you-- What are you tolerating? What are you putting up with, what was he putting up with, what was he putting up with in his current job that he knew he didn't like, but you just grown so numb to it where he grew to tolerate the condition?

For you as a job hunter, particularly when you get to the counteroffer phase or the resignation phase, which may lead to the counteroffer, it is important for you to be conscious of the things that you are putting up with work that just really don't serve you. That's because when you get to the point when you resign and your employer says, "What is it going to take? What is it going to take to keep you," and they start selling you about the money, is not just the money that is been driving you out the door. It is the things that you been putting up with for the longest time there really forcing you to look at other choices.

So, again, write down the things that you are tolerating, the things that you're putting up with that you really don't care for were there making you emotionally numb rather than conscious and passionate and loving everything about your work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Are Some Good Ways to Turn Down a Counteroffer? (VIDEO)


In this video, I describe a scenario that someone faces where they need to turn down a counteroffer… And it is very painful.

counteroffer

Summary

Someone wrote to me about how to best turn down a counteroffer and I am compelled to give you some texture to this so that you can understand the dilemma this person has.

The person is happy in their current job, but they were recruited by a foreign firm that offer them a salary double what they are currently earning.

Wow!

But we don’t know if this is a $40,000 a year person who has been offered $80,000, a $100,000 a year person who has been offered $200,000… We have no sense of the numbers.

They really like the job and found it very interesting, they love the money and gave notice. At this point, the persons manager does their version of, “But why? We love you! Don’t go! We need you! Don’t do anything yet. I’m going to talk to my boss.

His boss is the owner of the firm and comes back to the job hunter (as I am recording this, it is November) and says to the job hunter, “we are going to be able to pay you much more (but not as much money as the other offers for).”

In the position with the foreign firm, the person can work from home, and double the money.

It is an interesting choice for the person but after some weighing alternatives, he or she has decided to turn down the counteroffer. What are some good ways to do this?

I want to address one detail head on. If this is the owner of the firm, what is going to change between now in November and December other than the fact that the other offer has been turned down. That will allow them to increase it then and not today? <Sniff> <Sniff>

I smell something unpleasant here but let’s give him the benefit of the doubt.

You made a decision that you want to leave. Great. How do you turn down the counteroffer gracefully?

You sit down with your manager, you look them square in the ally and you say, “You know, I really spent a lot of time thinking about it and I decided that I am going to take the other offer and go.

Because you are responsive to the counteroffer, they may try to take another run at you to try to persuade you to stay.

Wait! Don’t do anything yet! I’m going to bring in the owner. He or she is going to make a different!

You know, create a big drama to try to stop you.

So if and when this trauma occurs with the president of the firm, all I want you to calmly say is, “Look, I’ve no complaints about this firm. You guys have been great to me but this is my time to go. And if I discover that I made a mistake,.I will have weighed the alternatives and I will learn something from it.

They may turn around and try to exert pressure on you. Thus I want to remind you that you need to speak with a very calm tone, sounding like you are reflecting. “This is been a hard decision to make and I hear you. Please respect my choice.

I’m giving 2 weeks notice. I’m sure you can find someone to do the job within 2 weeks. Just go out there and try; after all, there are people out there looking for work. I’m sure someone is qualified to do the job.

Just maintain your calm and, if for some reason, they get under your skin, PLEASE do not react. Do not be reactive and lashing out.

Try to maintain your cool and simply say, “Again, we are going around in a circle here. I have made up my mind. Please respect my choice.

Stand up. Shake their hands and leave.

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Should I Tell The Recruiter I Have Counteroffer?


You’ve been looking for a job for a while, received and accepted an offer from a firm, given notice and received a counteroffer. Should you tell the recruiter?

Summary

Should I tell a recruiter I have a counteroffer? I want to start off with a few questions.

In telling the recruiter you have a counteroffer, what are you trying to accomplish? If you want to stay where you are, if your current employer has resolved every single reason why you decided to leave (after all, it wasn’t only about earning more money; it wasn’t just about getting a better job; it may have involved coworkers. It may have involved promotional opportunities), stay. What are you hoping to gain by telling the recruiter?

If the counteroffer is one where your current employer says, “We’ll match the offer,” that takes care of the money part of the situation. What about the rest of it?

By the way, there are two different types of recruiters. Agency recruiters and corporate recruiters. Our bill with both a little bit later. Right now, I’m talking about you and your side of this.

So, again, if they match the money, so what? There still all these other things that are problematic. I talk to people all the time you stay when the money is matched and then call me a month later and asked if I can get the previous offer back.

NO! You burned a bridge. You said yes and now you said no. They have long memories.

What you do instead is ask yourself why you would want to state an organization that’s holding you back that will keep you at the same desk for a higher paycheck. If the that’s the reason you are leaving, you put a gun to their head, they will remember that when review time comes along or the next time that there’s a promotion and they have a choice between you and the person that was loyal. They will reward the loyal one, obviously.

Unfortunately, people are seduced by the money and start jumping for it, begging for more and forget that there were other factors important, too.

Why would you stay with an organization we had to put a gun to their head, force them to make promises that they may forget later on in order to keep you.They may change nothing once you turn down the other offer.

The second thing I want to speak to is the difference between corporate recruiter and agency recruiter in this scenario.

Agency recruiter may pull out this article called, “Counteroffers: The Road to Ruin.” This is an article written many years ago in a publication for recruiters. It tries to persuade job hunters that staying in a current job instead of joining the firm they promise to join will kill your career because employers have long memories and remember the disloyalty. After all, all they’ve done is give you your next raise a little early, nothing changes, etc.. They will beat you up relentlessly.

You have to calmly deflect that and tell them, “Go to the client. Tell them to up the money. I’ll do it for this. It has to be a little bit above. After all, how do I gain if it it’s the same money?”

With a corporate recruiter, will generally seem a little more care. Agency recruiters are afraid of losing their fee, the big payday for all the work that they’ve done. A corporate recruiter will ask, “Why do you want to stay? What is it about your old job that’s changed the makes it better than ours?”

“Well, they match the money.”

“What about all those other things that they haven’t improved upon??”

You may eventually get to, “Well, I need a little bit more,” but when push comes to shove they will either be able to do it or not be able to do it and you will have to make a decision.

I’ll end by saying if it is only the money, remember that you put a gun to their head to get it. If they change other conditions, then maybe it’s worth considering. Caveat emptor. Yes, tell other recruiters but have a reasonable expectation of what you can get from it. Just know that statistically, when I’ve seen people stay, problems arise later on.

When you go to a new place, you start fresh with a halo around you, in some respects it’s easier and in some respects it’s harder.  They view you as their Savior, a solution for them a solution for them, rather than someone aggravation on a Friday afternoon by giving notice.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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