Is It OK to Take a Counteroffer in This Case? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is OK to accept a counteroffer.

Summary

Here is 1 of those questions I was asked on quora and I want to help sort this out for someone.

Here is the scenario. A person has been working in a job that he or she really likes. He gets a call from someone that he interviewed with. Several years ago. In the call, the person is offered a 45% increase in salary. They don't feel underpaid about the amount of the increase was so significant that they had to consider it. When they gave notice, the boss countered with a proposal that exceeded the increase the other firm had made and saying that it would change nothing in their relationship. There will be no ill will or anything like that.

The boss said that the salary gap was big enough that he couldn't blame me. He would have done the same thing in my shoes.  They had a candid conversation and the person writes, "I would love to stay in my current job with this new salary. I know for sure I will be much happier at my current company. Then with the new one   But the advice is usually to never ever take a counteroffer.  I am wondering if this should be 1 of those exceptions."

I want to start by saying that there are no rules except the ones that you want to engage with.

So, don't look to the outside for the rule; just look for what feels right.

I don't know if there will be an impact on you by staying; that's usually what most of the caution is about.

The cautions usually say "You are getting your next raise in advance. They're going to hold it over you. After all, when it comes time for promotion, are they going to reward you or the loyal person who hasn't made waves?" That is the standard advice.

When I hear about a 45% raise, I tend to think of an individual with a lower salary. So it's not like you're making $240,000 per year and being offered a 45% increase. The probability is that you are a lower wage relatively new person in the workforce for whom (I don't know what your real numbers are because you don't really speak about them)-- let's say you're a $40,000 per year person getting a 45% raise-- you are still under $60,000. That's chump change to a firm.

Don't be concerned about percentages. Even though everyone is throwing that percentage in your face , and I know will make a difference, but at the end of the day, it still translates into, "you are not making a lot of money and you have been underpaid for a long time."

The real thing is can you trust your boss. I know from experience that if I feel blackmailed to do something and there is a bad day, the 1st thing I would do is say, "I can't believe I gave this person 45% more and they are still working like crap for me!"

Again, it's an emotional response. I'm not criticizing your boss. I just know that at that moment he was trying to sell you on staying with their firm. Just consider that they have good intentions and, like an abusive spouse, may not be able to fulfill them in their entirety.

At the end of the day I have to say trust your gut.

It is really the best advice someone can give you. After all, you know the people that are involved.

The only question I would have for you is if your value was so much higher than what you are being paid previously, why were you underpaid for so long? Why did your current firm take advantage of you?

Once you have that answer for yourself, I think you know what decision to make.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

The Counteroffer You Shouldn’t Accept (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter presents the counteroffer you should not except as well as the one you should hope him employer does make.

Summary

You have spent a period of time working for an organization day in and day out. You are frustrated. Frustration is anger that should be directed outside, but you've spent a lot of time internalizing anger. So, you feel like you are in conflict. You finally gotten to a point where you decide to do something about it. That's great news.

You going out on interviews. You have kiss a lot of frogs. Finally, Prince Charming has shown up and there is a firm that wants to hire you... And it looks great! You have an opportunity to make more money, to resolve some of the previous issues, whatever the reason was an you've received an offer that you find this acceptable.

You given the notice and your boss comes over to you while you're sitting there whistling, "I'm getting out! I'm getting out!" They say something to the effect of, "Can I see you in my office for second?" You are there, they are there, maybe HR is there the other going to offer you money to salve the wound. There's been a wound on you for a long time ago. They are going to put a nice lotion called more money there. They're going to promise you that they are going to do things better.

You suddenly go, "WOW! Look! The world is spinning around me! They are going to be good to me now!" It's kind of like a puppy that has been hit a bunch of times and suddenly goes, "(Goofy voice) Okay, there is going to be good food for me here. Okay. " This is supposed to be enough to keep you. Think about it. That's what's really going on here.

Instead, what they should be doing is saying something to the effect of, "You know, we made a mistake. I really wish we could correct things with you but the next firm is really getting someone terrific." In other words, acknowledging the error that they made in how they conducted themselves , which you will notice that when they make the counteroffer about only money, they never do. Even when they do, it goes by so quickly because they really think that all is going to take is more money.

It's kind of like, I think using this analogy, it's something like being abused. You've been hit for a while and the puppy suddenly goes in the puppy suddenly goes, "I'm out of here," and starts running away. The master then says, "Okay doggy I will do better." What happens is that people refer to old patterns; it's not so easy to change, is it? How many times have you tried to lose weight or go to the gym and bulk up? It is not going to be easy for your manager to change.

Yet, that's basically what happens. Will pay you more and we promise to do better it is the offer that they are making to you.

Run when you hear that. Better to have your manager say, "You know, we screwed up. I'm sorry that you found it necessary to leave but if there's anything I can do in the future to help you, I would be happy to write that reference for you. I would be happy to support you in whatever way that I can."

That's the great counteroffer you should be looking for. That's the acknowledgment of their mistake. That's the acknowledgment that you were a top performer and that money is not going to bother you. Money is not the end of will problems that you would've had. It's an acknowledgment that you were a good employee.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

What Are You Tolerating? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Summary

I was doing a coaching call yesterday with someone and we got to a point in our conversation where he said something wonderful. What he said (and I think it is very relevant for you as a job hunter), he asked himself the question, "What am I tolerating?" I asked the question of you-- What are you tolerating? What are you putting up with, what was he putting up with, what was he putting up with in his current job that he knew he didn't like, but you just grown so numb to it where he grew to tolerate the condition?

For you as a job hunter, particularly when you get to the counteroffer phase or the resignation phase, which may lead to the counteroffer, it is important for you to be conscious of the things that you are putting up with work that just really don't serve you. That's because when you get to the point when you resign and your employer says, "What is it going to take? What is it going to take to keep you," and they start selling you about the money, is not just the money that is been driving you out the door. It is the things that you been putting up with for the longest time there really forcing you to look at other choices.

So, again, write down the things that you are tolerating, the things that you're putting up with that you really don't care for were there making you emotionally numb rather than conscious and passionate and loving everything about your work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The Counteroffer You Shouldn’t Accept | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter presents the counteroffer you should not except as well as the one you should hope him employer does make.
 
Summary

You have spent a period of time working for an organization day in and day out. You are frustrated. Frustration is anger that should be directed outside, but you've spent a lot of time internalizing anger. So, you feel like you are in conflict. You finally gotten to a point where you decide to do something about it. That's great news.

You going out on interviews. You have kiss a lot of frogs. Finally, Prince Charming has shown up and there is a firm that wants to hire you... And it looks great! You have an opportunity to make more money, to resolve some of the previous issues, whatever the reason was an you've received an offer that you find this acceptable.

You given the notice and your boss comes over to you while you're sitting there whistling, "I'm getting out! I'm getting out!" They say something to the effect of, "Can I see you in my office for second?" You are there, they are there, maybe HR is there the other going to offer you money to salve the wound. There's been a wound on you for a long time ago. They are going to put a nice lotion called more money there. They're going to promise you that they are going to do things better.

You suddenly go, "WOW! Look! The world is spinning around me! They are going to be good to me now!" It's kind of like a puppy that has been hit a bunch of times and suddenly goes, "(Goofy voice) Okay, there is going to be good food for me here. Okay. " This is supposed to be enough to keep you. Think about it. That's what's really going on here.

Instead, what they should be doing is saying something to the effect of, "You know, we made a mistake. I really wish we could correct things with you but the next firm is really getting someone terrific." In other words, acknowledging the error that they made in how they conducted themselves , which you will notice that when they make the counteroffer about only money, they never do. Even when they do, it goes by so quickly because they really think that all is going to take is more money.

It's kind of like, I think using this analogy, it's something like being abused. You've been hit for a while and the puppy suddenly goes in the puppy suddenly goes, "I'm out of here," and starts running away. The master then says, "Okay doggy I will do better." What happens is that people refer to old patterns; it's not so easy to change, is it? How many times have you tried to lose weight or go to the gym and bulk up? It is not going to be easy for your manager to change.

Yet, that's basically what happens. Will pay you more and we promise to do better it is the offer that they are making to you.

Run when you hear that. Better to have your manager say, "You know, we screwed up. I'm sorry that you found it necessary to leave but if there's anything I can do in the future to help you, I would be happy to write that reference for you. I would be happy to support you in whatever way that I can."

That's the great counteroffer you should be looking for. That's the acknowledgment of their mistake. That's the acknowledgment that you were a top performer and that money is not going to bother you. Money is not the end of will problems that you would've had. It's an acknowledgment that you were a good employee.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com and then forward your question to the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What to Do if You Take a Counteroffer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you should do if you accept a counteroffer.

Summary

If you decide it is in your interest to accept the counteroffer and you did accept the offer from the firm or, even if you didn't accept it yet and received the counteroffer decided to stay, the right thing to do is to offer apologies, appreciation to them say something to the effect of, "Thank you so much for all the time you put into interviewing and assessing me, this is a great opportunity. This is not the right time for me to accept it."

"BUT WHY?"

You will politely explain. From there, once you're done explaining, say, "Look, I understand you might be quite short. I want to offer you a few recommendations of people who might be able to do this role for you." Then give them referrals of people.

Do this with recruiters. If you're working through recruiter for this job. Don't give the referral directly to the company. Give it to the recruiter. After all, the only reason you got that company is through the recruiter. Let them make a living, right? They lost the fee because you made this decision. Replace the fee for them. Don't give it directly to the employer.

If you had the interview directly with the employer because you post a resume, they contacted you or you apply to an applicant tracking system or through networking, give the referral directly to them.

At the end of the day, I apologize, thank them profusely and offer referrals to fill the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What To Do If You Take A Counteroffer | Job Search Radio

EP 271 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you should do if you accept a counteroffer.

Summary

If you decide it is in your interest to accept the counteroffer and you did accept the offer from the firm or, even if you didn't accept it yet and received the counteroffer decided to stay, the right thing to do is to offer apologies, appreciation to them say something to the effect of, "Thank you so much for all the time you put into interviewing and assessing me, this is a great opportunity. This is not the right time for me to accept it."

"BUT WHY?"

You will politely explain. From there, once you're done explaining, say, "Look, I understand you might be quite short. I want to offer you a few recommendations of people who might be able to do this role for you." Then give them referrals of people.

Do this with recruiters. If you're working through recruiter for this job. Don't give the referral directly to the company. Give it to the recruiter. After all, the only reason you got that company is through the recruiter. Let them make a living, right? They lost the fee because you made this decision. Replace the fee for them. Don't give it directly to the employer.

If you had the interview directly with the employer because you post a resume, they contacted you or you apply to an applicant tracking system or through networking, give the referral directly to them.

At the end of the day, I apologize, thank them profusely and offer referrals to fill the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of JobSearchCoachingHQ.com interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Should I Stay or Should I Go? Playing “The Counteroffer Game”

Should I Stay or Should I Go?“This indecision’s buggin’ me 
If you don’t want me, set me free
Exactly whom I’m supposed to be 
Don’t you know which clothes even fit me? 
Come on and let me know 
Should I cool it or should I blow?”

                                                                                                      “Should I Stay or Should I Go,”                                                                                                         The Clash

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Delivering The Counteroffer For Max Results

If the words, “Can I see you for a minute” on a Friday afternoon are the words that strikes fear into all employers, then “counteroffer” is the one that strikes fear into an employee’s heart. “What should I do? They’ve matched my offer? 

It’s Friday afternoon. You walk into your boss’ office and ask the question that has scared many managers, “Do you have a minute?” At that moment, s/he knows you’re resigning and if he/she wants you, they will have to fight to keep you.Should I Stay or Should I Go?

“Why? We love you. Please stay! Don’t go! What do we have to do to keep you? What is it going to take? How much is it going to take? How much?” The message is always the same, even if those are not the exact words.

Not long ago, two people who accepted an offer from a client of mine called to tell me that they had accepted a counteroffer to remain with their current firm. The one who had been with their current firm for twelve years seemed to make a decision that made sense.

The other, however, had pleaded to get a full time job and leave consulting. His assignment was ending and he said he wanted the stability of a full time job, he told me. Earning $45 per hour without benefits, he accepted a counteroffer of a small increase in his hourly rate, rather than a full time salary of $93000 plus bonus, great benefits and three weeks of vacation to start from an employer that he kept begging me to get him an interview with that he said he loved.

Why did he decide to stay?

He told me, “They need me. (as though my client didn’t; as though the loss of revenue for his consulting firm and the difficulty they would have replacing him quickly at the client didn’t bother them a wee bit).”

Bringing Out “The Big Guns” for The Counteroffer

Should I Stay or Should I Go?Between the moment you give notice and your departure date, your employer may try to persuade you to stay.

Your mentor at the firm (the person in the firm who is not your manager who makes an obligatory call to you every 6 or 12 months) calls to talk with you. Your colleagues ask you to lunch and want to know why you’re going, where you are going to and for how much. Your boss’ boss asks to meet you. You are now the most important person at your company. You’re asked, “What will it take to keep you?” And this goes on for two weeks. 

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The Pressure To Accept a Counteroffer

The pressure to accept a counteroffer can be enormous. The monetary offer can be tempting to stay. The promises to rectify everything that ticks you can be enormous. Yet, let’s look at what is going on from an employer’s perspective.

Years ago, I represented someone who headed a function with a global consulting firm where he ran an enormous amount of business at a government agency. “I want to leave consulting,” he told me. The offer he received was for just under $1 million in salary plus bonus and a sign on with a large financial firm in New York City.

His former client, the head of a large and dreaded US government agency called him to make a case for him to stay. The offer was for less money than my client was prepared to pay with promises made orally to make a few trivial changes. The conversation ended with words, “I need you,” he said.

Your resignation, like this person’s, has arrived at an untimely moment; they are not prepared to replace you with someone who can step up and do your job, they say.

The cost of replacing you in dollars and effort (how many resumes will need to be read and people interviewed before they hire someone who they will need to train) PLUS they may have to pay a higher salary than what you were earning plus a fee to the search firm for a person who doesn’t know what you know. Can you see it’s not about you, personally?

Should I Stay or Should I Go?Don’t believe me?

Consider how many well-intentioned managers and Directors have to fire the very people they deem are indispensable when budgets need to be cut. How hollow their words seem then.

Preparing for a Counteroffer

To head off being seduced, pressured and/or manipulated with a counteroffer, here’s what you do:

At the time you decide to change jobs, write down the reasons why you want to leave.

I’m bored.

I want to make more money.

My boss is a micro manager.

I want to learn something new.

I want to work closer to home

I’m bored and getting stale

There is no upside for me here.

Write down your reasons and put them in a place where you can find them at the time you give notice.

Then, before giving notice, find the list and review it. Do not be seduced by the emotional response you may receive. Remember, the money they offer may only be your next raise pushed up a few months.

Listen carefully to the promises that are made and remember that nothing is being put into writing; it is just the desperate effort to keep someone who was taken for granted for so long who they are now forced to remember they have underpaid, treated poorly and need to accomplish their objectives.

Few counteroffers should be considered, let alone accepted. By the way, a few months later, I received the consultant’s resume again and an apology for the mistake he made. Suffice it to say, my client did not want to talk with them again.

As for the person who took the call from the head of the US agency, he was shown the door in 9 months.

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© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017   

If you liked the article, read, “7 Days to Bulk Up Your In-Person Networking.” 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Are Some Good Ways to Turn Down a Counteroffer? (VIDEO)


In this video, I describe a scenario that someone faces where they need to turn down a counteroffer… And it is very painful.

counteroffer

Summary

Someone wrote to me about how to best turn down a counteroffer and I am compelled to give you some texture to this so that you can understand the dilemma this person has.

The person is happy in their current job, but they were recruited by a foreign firm that offer them a salary double what they are currently earning.

Wow!

But we don’t know if this is a $40,000 a year person who has been offered $80,000, a $100,000 a year person who has been offered $200,000… We have no sense of the numbers.

They really like the job and found it very interesting, they love the money and gave notice. At this point, the persons manager does their version of, “But why? We love you! Don’t go! We need you! Don’t do anything yet. I’m going to talk to my boss.

His boss is the owner of the firm and comes back to the job hunter (as I am recording this, it is November) and says to the job hunter, “we are going to be able to pay you much more (but not as much money as the other offers for).”

In the position with the foreign firm, the person can work from home, and double the money.

It is an interesting choice for the person but after some weighing alternatives, he or she has decided to turn down the counteroffer. What are some good ways to do this?

I want to address one detail head on. If this is the owner of the firm, what is going to change between now in November and December other than the fact that the other offer has been turned down. That will allow them to increase it then and not today? <Sniff> <Sniff>

I smell something unpleasant here but let’s give him the benefit of the doubt.

You made a decision that you want to leave. Great. How do you turn down the counteroffer gracefully?

You sit down with your manager, you look them square in the ally and you say, “You know, I really spent a lot of time thinking about it and I decided that I am going to take the other offer and go.

Because you are responsive to the counteroffer, they may try to take another run at you to try to persuade you to stay.

Wait! Don’t do anything yet! I’m going to bring in the owner. He or she is going to make a different!

You know, create a big drama to try to stop you.

So if and when this trauma occurs with the president of the firm, all I want you to calmly say is, “Look, I’ve no complaints about this firm. You guys have been great to me but this is my time to go. And if I discover that I made a mistake,.I will have weighed the alternatives and I will learn something from it.

They may turn around and try to exert pressure on you. Thus I want to remind you that you need to speak with a very calm tone, sounding like you are reflecting. “This is been a hard decision to make and I hear you. Please respect my choice.

I’m giving 2 weeks notice. I’m sure you can find someone to do the job within 2 weeks. Just go out there and try; after all, there are people out there looking for work. I’m sure someone is qualified to do the job.

Just maintain your calm and, if for some reason, they get under your skin, PLEASE do not react. Do not be reactive and lashing out.

Try to maintain your cool and simply say, “Again, we are going around in a circle here. I have made up my mind. Please respect my choice.

Stand up. Shake their hands and leave.

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Should You Consider a Counteroffer? Following Advice from “The Godfather”

Pacino Godfather

 

On any given Friday afternoon, bosses around the world are going through mental calculations when they hear you say, “Can I see you for a minute.”

I remember hearing the question when Ford came to me at [2:30] that day (you never forget your first time). He was not a stellar performer and had disappeared for a 4 hour lunch only two days before without giving us the courtesy of a phone call. Thus, I was not surprised when he asked to speak with me. He was obviously looking for a job.

The question I was now faced with was how to respond to what was coming. Ford awkwardly explained his decision to leave and the opportunity he received from a new firm in a new field. He was taking a job outside of recruiting. I decided there was nothing to wish him good luck. How could I extend a counteroffer to someone who had decided to leave the work he was doing?

But you may be facing a different challenge as a job hunter. You may be joining a firm doing similar work to what you are currently doing but for different people. How do you respond? How do you respond?

For years, it has been agency gospel to reach into a desk drawer or email an article written by Paul Hawkinson called, “The Road to Ruin,” that discourages people from taking a counter offer.

The article points out

  • Any situation in which an employee is forced to get an outside offer before the present employer will suggest a raise, promotion or better working conditions, is suspect.
  • No matter what the company says when making its counteroffer, you’ll always be considered a fidelity risk. Having once demonstrated your lack of loyalty (for whatever reason), you’ll lose your status as a “team player” and your place in the inner circle.
  • Counteroffers are usually nothing more than stall devices to give your employer time to replace you.
  • Your reasons for wanting to leave still exist. Conditions are just made a bit more tolerable in the short term because of the raise, promotion or promises made to keep you.
  • Counteroffers are only made in response to a threat to quit. Will you have to solicit an offer and threaten to quit every time you deserve better working conditions?
  • Decent and well-managed companies don’t make counteroffers…EVER! Their policies are fair and equitable. They won’t be subjected to “counteroffer coercion” or what they perceive as blackmail.

Now some of the points may have some validity. Your loyalty may be suspect . . . for a while. But are they really a stall tactic to replace you? Unlikely. But the last bullet point is ridiculous . . . well-managed companies DO make counteroffers. But should you consider one?

 

Pacino It's BusinessAfter Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando) is shot in Little Italy, young Michael (Al Pacino) saved his father from being whacked at the hospital he was recuperating in, having his jaw broken in the process by a crooked police captain. At a meeting with the various capos of the Corleone family, Michael suggests that Sonny (James Caan) agree to a meeting with the thug who orchestrated the hit and that he would be willing to kill Sollozo and the police captain.

Sonny mocks him.

“Hey, whattaya gonna do, nice college boy, eh? Didn’t want to get mixed up in the family business, huh? Now you wanna gun down a police captain, why, because he slapped you in the face a little bit? Hah@ What do you think this is the Army where you shoot’em a mile away? You’ve gotta get up close like this and bada-bing! You blow their brains all over your nice Ivy League suit.”

Michael makes his persuasive argument that he can do it, concluding with a look of death and words said with steel.

It’s Not Personal, Sonny. It’s Strictly Business.

Making decisions for personal/emotional reasons, rather than from a place of calculating cost/ benefit is silly.

There are a lot of things we can put behind us if we are paid enough or if previous circumstances have changed.

After all, haven’t you argued with your wife, husband, partner, father, mother, son, daughter, friend or others and gotten over it?

Of course you have!

The questions you need to ask yourself are

Why Did I Look for a Job?

What is Going to Be Different?

Is That Enough?

Preparing Michael for what will be the inevitable attempt to kill him about Barzini, the head of another family, Don Vito has great advice couched in a sexist statement.

“It’s an old habit. I spent my whole life trying not to be careless—women and children can be careless, but not men.”

Applying this statement to a counteroffer, you need to go over the changes being proposed to you and whether they are enough.

Let’s say, they match the $10,000 raise. Is that enough? After all, if they had to hire a replacement for you, they might have to spend $20 – $75000 or more to replace you based upon your salary level (Obviously for executive positions, the numbers used would be higher). Why only settle for $10000.

Will you be doing the same job for the same manager who has gotten under your skin? What will be different between the two of you? Is that enough?

What about the work?

The department?

Advancement opportunities?

What about that co-worker who has been grabbing credit for your ideas?

What will change about your circumstances? Are these enough for you? Can you negotiate additional changes?

Kay Adams

Over time, Michael’s sociopathic nature emerges and the lies in the relationship with his wife Kay (Diane Keaton) become more profound. She realizes that she can’t lie to herself any more about who Michael really is and decides to leave him.

Your boss may not be a sociopath, your work may not be so terrible, but statistics say that you will leave within the next 24 months after deciding to stay.

Going into the discussion with open your eyes wide open is preferable to deluding yourself.

Whatever your decision, I hope it works out for you.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Have a question you want me to answer? Contact me through PrestoExperts

 

 

The Return of Counteroffers

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to recognize the signals of a potential counteroffer so that you do not lose a key person you want to hire.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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