What to Do if You Take a Counteroffer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you should do if you accept a counteroffer.

Summary

If you decide it is in your interest to accept the counteroffer and you did accept the offer from the firm or, even if you didn't accept it yet and received the counteroffer decided to stay, the right thing to do is to offer apologies, appreciation to them say something to the effect of, "Thank you so much for all the time you put into interviewing and assessing me, this is a great opportunity. This is not the right time for me to accept it."

"BUT WHY?"

You will politely explain. From there, once you're done explaining, say, "Look, I understand you might be quite short. I want to offer you a few recommendations of people who might be able to do this role for you." Then give them referrals of people.

Do this with recruiters. If you're working through recruiter for this job. Don't give the referral directly to the company. Give it to the recruiter. After all, the only reason you got that company is through the recruiter. Let them make a living, right? They lost the fee because you made this decision. Replace the fee for them. Don't give it directly to the employer.

If you had the interview directly with the employer because you post a resume, they contacted you or you apply to an applicant tracking system or through networking, give the referral directly to them.

At the end of the day, I apologize, thank them profusely and offer referrals to fill the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Is It OK to Take a Counteroffer in This Case? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is OK to accept a counteroffer.

Is it OK to accept a counteroffer in this case?

Summary

Here is 1 of those questions I was asked on quora and I want to help sort this out for someone.

Here is the scenario. A person has been working in a job that he or she really likes. He gets a call from someone that he interviewed with. Several years ago. In the call, the person is offered a 45% increase in salary. They don’t feel underpaid about the amount of the increase was so significant that they had to consider it. When they gave notice, the boss countered with a proposal that exceeded the increase the other firm had made and saying that it would change nothing in their relationship. There will be no ill will or anything like that.

The boss said that the salary gap was big enough that he couldn’t blame me. He would have done the same thing in my shoes.  They had a candid conversation and the person writes, “I would love to stay in my current job with this new salary. I know for sure I will be much happier at my current company. Then with the new one   But the advice is usually to never ever take a counteroffer.  I am wondering if this should be 1 of those exceptions.

I want to start by saying that there are no rules except the ones that you want to engage with.

So, don’t look to the outside for the rule; just look for what feels right.

I don’t know if there will be an impact on you by staying; that’s usually what most of the caution is about.

The cautions usually say “You are getting your next raise in advance. They’re going to hold it over you. After all, when it comes time for promotion, are they going to reward you or the loyal person who hasn’t made waves?” That is the standard advice.

When I hear about a 45% raise, I tend to think of an individual with a lower salary. So it’s not like you’re making $240,000 per year and being offered a 45% increase. The probability is that you are a lower wage relatively new person in the workforce for whom (I don’t know what your real numbers are because you don’t really speak about them)– let’s say you’re a $40,000 per year person getting a 45% raise– you are still under $60,000. That’s chump change to a firm.

Don’t be concerned about percentages. Even though everyone is throwing that percentage in your face , and I know will make a difference, but at the end of the day, it still translates into, “you are not making a lot of money and you have been underpaid for a long time.

The real thing is can you trust your boss. I know from experience that if I feel blackmailed to do something and there is a bad day, the 1st thing I would do is say, “I can’t believe I gave this person 45% more and they are still working like crap for me!”

Again, it’s an emotional response. I’m not criticizing your boss. I just know that at that moment he was trying to sell you on staying with their firm. Just consider that they have good intentions and, like an abusive spouse, may not be able to fulfill them in their entirety.

At the end of the day I have to say trust your gut.

It is really the best advice someone can give you. After all, you know the people that are involved.

The only question I would have for you is if your value was so much higher than what you are being paid previously, why were you underpaid for so long? Why did your current firm take advantage of you?

Once you have that answer for yourself, I think you know what decision to make.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Tell The Recruiter I Have Counteroffer?


You’ve been looking for a job for a while, received and accepted an offer from a firm, given notice and received a counteroffer. Should you tell the recruiter?

Summary

Should I tell a recruiter I have a counteroffer? I want to start off with a few questions.

In telling the recruiter you have a counteroffer, what are you trying to accomplish? If you want to stay where you are, if your current employer has resolved every single reason why you decided to leave (after all, it wasn’t only about earning more money; it wasn’t just about getting a better job; it may have involved coworkers. It may have involved promotional opportunities), stay. What are you hoping to gain by telling the recruiter?

If the counteroffer is one where your current employer says, “We’ll match the offer,” that takes care of the money part of the situation. What about the rest of it?

By the way, there are two different types of recruiters. Agency recruiters and corporate recruiters. Our bill with both a little bit later. Right now, I’m talking about you and your side of this.

So, again, if they match the money, so what? There still all these other things that are problematic. I talk to people all the time you stay when the money is matched and then call me a month later and asked if I can get the previous offer back.

NO! You burned a bridge. You said yes and now you said no. They have long memories.

What you do instead is ask yourself why you would want to state an organization that’s holding you back that will keep you at the same desk for a higher paycheck. If the that’s the reason you are leaving, you put a gun to their head, they will remember that when review time comes along or the next time that there’s a promotion and they have a choice between you and the person that was loyal. They will reward the loyal one, obviously.

Unfortunately, people are seduced by the money and start jumping for it, begging for more and forget that there were other factors important, too.

Why would you stay with an organization we had to put a gun to their head, force them to make promises that they may forget later on in order to keep you.They may change nothing once you turn down the other offer.

The second thing I want to speak to is the difference between corporate recruiter and agency recruiter in this scenario.

Agency recruiter may pull out this article called, “Counteroffers: The Road to Ruin.” This is an article written many years ago in a publication for recruiters. It tries to persuade job hunters that staying in a current job instead of joining the firm they promise to join will kill your career because employers have long memories and remember the disloyalty. After all, all they’ve done is give you your next raise a little early, nothing changes, etc.. They will beat you up relentlessly.

You have to calmly deflect that and tell them, “Go to the client. Tell them to up the money. I’ll do it for this. It has to be a little bit above. After all, how do I gain if it it’s the same money?”

With a corporate recruiter, will generally seem a little more care. Agency recruiters are afraid of losing their fee, the big payday for all the work that they’ve done. A corporate recruiter will ask, “Why do you want to stay? What is it about your old job that’s changed the makes it better than ours?”

“Well, they match the money.”

“What about all those other things that they haven’t improved upon??”

You may eventually get to, “Well, I need a little bit more,” but when push comes to shove they will either be able to do it or not be able to do it and you will have to make a decision.

I’ll end by saying if it is only the money, remember that you put a gun to their head to get it. If they change other conditions, then maybe it’s worth considering. Caveat emptor. Yes, tell other recruiters but have a reasonable expectation of what you can get from it. Just know that statistically, when I’ve seen people stay, problems arise later on.

When you go to a new place, you start fresh with a halo around you, in some respects it’s easier and in some respects it’s harder.  They view you as their Savior, a solution for them a solution for them, rather than someone aggravation on a Friday afternoon by giving notice.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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