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Recruiters

How to Get on on Recruiter’s Radar | Job Search Radio


I discuss how to get on a recruiter’s radar.

Summary

So you've seen an ad and it's a roadmap for what they're looking for. Take a look at your resume and ask yourself, "How does that really match up? Does it match up? Do I have the experience, but my resume doesn't really express it well? I need to fix the resume." That's going to be the benchmark by which they go. You can also get on their radar by . . . There are going to be times where they are going to contact you and say, "Hey, I'm doing this with our client. Do you know someone?" and being supportive of them. If they get abusive, and one particular recruiter calls you every day four times a day for referrals, you just tell them, "This is getting to be a little too much. I'm willing to help but I'm not stupid. I've got a job to do. It is not putting money in your pocket. I'm willing to help but why don't you send an email with this information?

Now the true recruiter model,they are out there hunting for you. They're trying to find you. If you're working with at a level where they're going to be dealing with a contingency firm or an executive firm, that really doesn't matter. Part of it is you want them to find you. And there's a number of easy ways to do it.

Number one is you start being in situations where there it is publicity about you. So, for example, you've written a book, you have an article, there are a number of articles that you've written, a number of books. The firm that you are going to wind up looking for someone like that because they represent being an expert. In another instance. Let's say, you are not at that higher level where you're an author and publishing deal with a major publisher. Another thing you can do you speak at conferences. You know, you can be part of a program for a trade group where you are presenting on a subject. It doesn't have to be the most sophisticated presentation but understand they'll find you through Google.

Another way is your LinkedIn profile. There are recruiters who operate at that level who are looking through LinkedIn and you need to demonstrate a keyword rich LinkedIn profile where they are finding you based on your experiences. They are seeing things in the profile such as articles that you've written for LinkedIn, connections to podcasts where you have been interviewed or perhaps PowerPoints on SlideShare that help firms recognize and help recruiters recognize I should say that you're not the average individual. By doing these powerpoints and putting them up on SlideShare and connecting them to your LinkedIn profile, it's a great way to stand out from the pack and and demonstrate that you are an expert.

Have a Web site where you have your resume. Have a blog on that Web site where you talk about, not your family but professional matters. These were all great ways for discovery to occur because, understand a real headhunter is help, they are trying to find you and they are looking looking for people in ways, did not trying to find you on LinkedIn most of the time.
They may use LinkedIn to correlate, but they are using Google to try to find people who will impress their clients, just by the fact that there is PR about them they presented . . . a whole host of things along these lines.

So I want you to think of your career as a business and, in doing so, when you look at what businesses do to be discovered, you know, it's not just the advertising that they do because there are a lot of places that don't advertise that you go to, right?

Just because you've seen them in the neighborhood that you're buying. After all, the first time shopped on Amazon you never heard of them before. You had no idea what to expect. You went to Amazon, had a great experience. Again, you went to Amazon to be discovered and put yourself in the position to be discovered. That will go a long way toward being discovered by third party recruiters.

And again, if you're working with the agency level with someone who only response so resumes that are sent to them, remember your resume just has to demonstrate the fit and then they will be happy to help.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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Sh*t Recruiters Say


Here’s some more BS recruiter say.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Sh*t Recruiters Say


A new series where I demonstrate some of the sh*t recruiters say.

What sh*t have recruiters said to you? Leave a comment below.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching throughout your search, interview coaching or help with a salary negotiation?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line. In the body of the email, tell me what you would like help with.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Working With Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


On this show, Jeff speaks about working with recruiters and what you can expect.

NOTE: This show was recorded in 2011 and was among the first recordings for No BS Job Search Advice Radio. Do you notice any progress?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

More About Working With Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011) Please disregard any jobs mentioned on the show. I no longer do recruiting and the positions were filled years ago.

On this show, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks about working with recruiters, their attitudes and how to work with them.

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Call Recruiters Directly to Find Me a Job or Wait for Them to Call Me? (VIDEO)

Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job, or wait for them to call me?

Summary

The question for today is, "Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job or wait for them to call me?"

I'm not sure what you think recruiters do...When you are calling them up, are you paying them anything for this? And you expect them to "find you a job?" Seriously, when you say, "find you a job," you have the equation all wrong.

The equation for a recruiter, headhunter, any professional that is in the employment business is they are there to fill jobs and get paid for their efforts. They are not there to "find you a job" except coincidentally in that process. So, in terms of waiting for them to call you, (1) See if you can identify people who work in your field. Seriously. Don't just call recruiters up at random; see if you can find people who work in your field.

(1a) See if they have any jobs open that fit your background. They are not there to find the job for you. They are there to fill a job with you or someone like you. I say it that way because if you act like a jerk, There is someone there who is not going to act like a jerk who they are going to work with To fill this position with because they don't want to get embarrassed in front of their client. That's because the client is going to stop calling them If there are too many people that they refer who act stupid.

So, you always want to be in the position where recruiters are contacting you. That's because it is clear that they have a role open that might fit you. You can always look at job ads on job boards for local newspapers, websites and a whole host of other places to find individual recruiters who have positions open that fit your background. Again, I want to be clear – – "that fit your background." Don't spam your resume and send it like so much garbage. They don't have time for this. If you do that you are Being like the people who spam them with Viagra ads that landed in their inbox all the time. It is just a colossal waste of time! To call them up and simply say, "Hey! I'm looking for a job,," It is no different than spam.

However, I don't want you to be passive. If you are in a professional field, what I want you to do Is have a quality LinkedIn profile that is keyword optimized So that you attract recruiters who have positions open for someone like you. You want to have your resume on a job born because that can ask you pretty wide net to people who are looking for people like you. You want to have your resume on Indeed, SimplyHired and Other sites in order to draw people to you who have positions open AND you want to be setting up search agents on different job boards so that they notify you When positions get listed. You want to be out there networking.

If you're not in a professional field, networking can take a different form. For example, if you are a recent grad you can go on LinkedIn, go across the ribbon on the top and see alumni from your school who may be a year or 2 ahead of you and you network with them. In blue-collar work, you can network with people you have worked with previouslyAnd see if they know about a position.

However, to call up a recruiter out of the blue To find a job for you? You are just kidding yourself.

Also say that you need my help. If you think this is the way it works, I want to encourage you to join JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. I have curated information that will help you find work, PLUS You can ask me questions that will help streamline your process and make your search go faster.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Does It Mean When The Recruiter Isn’t Returning My Calls or Emails? (VIDEO)


If I’m a job applicant and the recruiter I’m working with stops returning my calls and emails, what does that usually mean?

fingers-crossed

Summary

The question for today is:

If I’m a job applicant in the recruiter. I am working with stops returning my calls and emails, what does that usually mean?  

Well, let me pose a different scenario.  If you are going out with someone and they stop returning your calls, texts and emails, what would that mean?

You know what it means. Who are you kidding?  You just don’t like it.

Here is what often happens.  Job hunters have this mistaken notion that recruiters work for them.  They don’t.  They work for employers who pay them.  You aren’t paying them anything, right? You have to get this notion out of your head that you are working with them.  You aren’t working with them. They are trying to fill the positions.  Your background either fits or it doesn’t.  When they have something that makes sense, they will be in contact.  

You can drop them a message every once in a while (that doesn’t mean daily) to say, “I just wanted to let you know that I’m still available. If something comes up.”  

Often, what job hunters do because they are “working with the recruiter” is nag and pester the recruiter. 

Understand you are getting a message in the behavior in much the same way as in a dating scenario, if someone you were going out with stop returning your calls, you will get a message from that that they didn’t want to talk with you, right?  

So, you know what it means.  You just have to adjust.

Some people will say you have to work with a lot of recruiters.  I have no idea where you are, geographically, or where you are in your career.  For most people who do not have unique skills or are not at a leadership level, yes, you do have to connect with multiple recruiters.  Recruiters are not pounding on doors to persuade employers to speak with you.  That isn’t how the business works.

They are hired by employers and give them requirements for positions that they need to have filled and, if they find the right person, they will be paid for that.  They are not getting on the phone to make 100 phone calls to companies just for you using a call was that they have prearranged so that whenever someone walks in the door they call 100 people every single day.

No. They are filling jobs. They are not “placing people.”

Let’s assume that you are a relatively inexperienced person, you do need to be contacting multiple people and, more importantly, you do need to be contacting people who graduated from the school that you went to and learn how they got there current job and whether there might be something of their employer that might fit you. You are trying to work with multiple recruiters and responding to ads.  Networking to people that you don’t already know and doing informational interviews, networking, going to networking groups, telling everyone that you know repeatedly that you are looking for work…

It’s not enough to just simply tell them one time, you have to say it multiple times and the people are reminded that you are looking for job.  After all, when someone has a cold, do referred your doctor to them?  Probably not.  People need constant reminders to refer you to things that they care about.

Back your original question.  It probably means that they don’t have anything for you right now and leave them alone.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

No! No! No! It’s the Recruiter Who Lied!


Too often, people fall for stuff that recruiters say to them and blame employers. In this video, I illustrate one of those classic examples of recruiter BS.

Summary

People sometimes believe that they have relationships with recruiters. They have known them for a while. They trust them. The person seems honest. Let me point something out to you.

I was coaching someone recently who told me about a job he was submitted to buy a recruiter. He likes the guy and thinks he’s competent; the job hunter is not quick to give out praise to people.

The job hunter is looking for director role and goes on an interview for a position reporting to a manager. That tells you right away it is not a director role. He is interviewed by a staff person who reports to the manager; he queries a him about something that he knows little about and is wrong in his opinion, gets into an argument with the job hunter who, later, sent him a link to a Wikipedia article proving that he (the job hunter) was right.

“I was told this was a senior role by the recruiter. It’s reporting to a manager. Why did they change things?”

Let me let you in on a secret. They didn’t change anything; you were lied to by the recruiter.

If a firm changes a position from a director level to one reporting to a manager, this is not something they conveniently forget to tell the search firms about. Certainly, they will speak to the recruiter and tell them “You have this director coming in. We revise the position to one reporting to a manager (a senior architect, for example). Make sure the person will be okay with that.”

I’ve never seen a situation where firm didn’t tell me that when they revise the position so I can go back to the job hunter and not waste everyone’s time.

I had to stop in his tracks and tell him, “It’s not the firm. It’s the recruiter who lie to you!”

Recruiters take advantage of the relationship because they hoped that, if you go in the door, like the money, the job, or the company, maybe you will accept the job offer and they’ll earn a big fee. They believe that they have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

I have to challenge you about working with recruiters. There are a lot of very very good ones. After all I’ve done search from many many years and do more coaching now but still think of myself as a search professional. In the work that I’ve done I’ve always been forthright with job hunters I know a lot of people who are the same way.

Then there are the others. You don’t really know the difference when they tell you it’s a senior position. It’s a senior what? Senior manager? Senior director? Senior VP? What kind of senior are you talking about? In this case it became senior architect.

So get explicit with them because there is a seduction going on where search firms are individual recruiters play on the relationship to have you do things you really shouldn’t be doing because they are a colossal waste of your time.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Should I Tell The Recruiter I Have Counteroffer?


You’ve been looking for a job for a while, received and accepted an offer from a firm, given notice and received a counteroffer. Should you tell the recruiter?

Summary

Should I tell a recruiter I have a counteroffer? I want to start off with a few questions.

In telling the recruiter you have a counteroffer, what are you trying to accomplish? If you want to stay where you are, if your current employer has resolved every single reason why you decided to leave (after all, it wasn’t only about earning more money; it wasn’t just about getting a better job; it may have involved coworkers. It may have involved promotional opportunities), stay. What are you hoping to gain by telling the recruiter?

If the counteroffer is one where your current employer says, “We’ll match the offer,” that takes care of the money part of the situation. What about the rest of it?

By the way, there are two different types of recruiters. Agency recruiters and corporate recruiters. Our bill with both a little bit later. Right now, I’m talking about you and your side of this.

So, again, if they match the money, so what? There still all these other things that are problematic. I talk to people all the time you stay when the money is matched and then call me a month later and asked if I can get the previous offer back.

NO! You burned a bridge. You said yes and now you said no. They have long memories.

What you do instead is ask yourself why you would want to state an organization that’s holding you back that will keep you at the same desk for a higher paycheck. If the that’s the reason you are leaving, you put a gun to their head, they will remember that when review time comes along or the next time that there’s a promotion and they have a choice between you and the person that was loyal. They will reward the loyal one, obviously.

Unfortunately, people are seduced by the money and start jumping for it, begging for more and forget that there were other factors important, too.

Why would you stay with an organization we had to put a gun to their head, force them to make promises that they may forget later on in order to keep you.They may change nothing once you turn down the other offer.

The second thing I want to speak to is the difference between corporate recruiter and agency recruiter in this scenario.

Agency recruiter may pull out this article called, “Counteroffers: The Road to Ruin.” This is an article written many years ago in a publication for recruiters. It tries to persuade job hunters that staying in a current job instead of joining the firm they promise to join will kill your career because employers have long memories and remember the disloyalty. After all, all they’ve done is give you your next raise a little early, nothing changes, etc.. They will beat you up relentlessly.

You have to calmly deflect that and tell them, “Go to the client. Tell them to up the money. I’ll do it for this. It has to be a little bit above. After all, how do I gain if it it’s the same money?”

With a corporate recruiter, will generally seem a little more care. Agency recruiters are afraid of losing their fee, the big payday for all the work that they’ve done. A corporate recruiter will ask, “Why do you want to stay? What is it about your old job that’s changed the makes it better than ours?”

“Well, they match the money.”

“What about all those other things that they haven’t improved upon??”

You may eventually get to, “Well, I need a little bit more,” but when push comes to shove they will either be able to do it or not be able to do it and you will have to make a decision.

I’ll end by saying if it is only the money, remember that you put a gun to their head to get it. If they change other conditions, then maybe it’s worth considering. Caveat emptor. Yes, tell other recruiters but have a reasonable expectation of what you can get from it. Just know that statistically, when I’ve seen people stay, problems arise later on.

When you go to a new place, you start fresh with a halo around you, in some respects it’s easier and in some respects it’s harder.  They view you as their Savior, a solution for them a solution for them, rather than someone aggravation on a Friday afternoon by giving notice.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Sh*t Recruiters Say


Another little tidbit recruiters say.

What sh*t have recruiters said to you? 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching throughout your search, interview coaching or help with a salary negotiation?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line. In the body of the email, tell me what you would like help with.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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