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Final Interview With The Person Who Did the Job I Am Trying to Get


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This can be the easiest or most difficult interviews you can imagine. After all, this person has done the job that you are contending for. How do you play it?

Summary

A question I received from someone painted an interesting situation and that is the final person they are scheduled to meet with is the former person who did this job and has since been promoted and thus this position reports to them.

How do you handle that situation where the person you're talking with, your future boss, is coming out of this job and you're going to be reporting them?

So it's a fun scenario. It may be the trickiest of any interview you can do because they have opinions. They were obviously successful in that role and, as a result, can really offer you insights into how you can be successful. So consider that a lot of your interview is going to be picking their brain, asking them for advice, about how to be successful in the role. So, for example, they may talk with you about your background and talk to you about how you handled situations in the past and you answer those questions.

You answer them the same way you happened previously because as because, as I've said in other interviews, you want to be congruent with everything that you've said before. But at the end of answering some of the questions, you might turn around and say, "Given your experience in this role with this be effective in this case? How did you do it with this user? How did they respond to it? Was it effective? How would you recommend I do it?" Do certain things to extract from them information that (number one) will be useful to you when you're in the role. Or more importantly treats them as an ally that lets them know that this is not an adversarial conversation, that lets them know it's not an adversarial conversation but one where you're taking input from them about how to be successful. After all, would they have been promoted if they weren't successful in this role? I don't think so.

So it can be tricky if you're not someone who you asks the follow up, who doesn't approach them for advice or input about how to be effective in the role. You might ask them about some of the misses that they have, some of the things that backfired in some way shape or form did not work. Emphasize the positive.

As an afterthought, later on, say, "You have given me a world of information and, I'm sure, not everything that you did worked. What missed? What didn't work with these folks so I don't step into it.

So that's the simplest way I would approach an interview with the former manager for the group.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What They Want to See at a Final Interview (VIDEO)


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There are a few qualities firms want to see at a final. It isn’t hard. Pay attention and deliver.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about final interviews and what they want to see from you at the final interview. I want to be clear that I'm not good be covering what you want to be doing per se. You know you have to practice. That should be given. I look at it is having 3 primary "C's. "If you seen some of my early stuff, you would've seen that I talk about how a firm looks for competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry and charisma; all of which add up to personal leadership.

Here, I have it narrowed down and I want you to think in terms of CONGRUENCE, CONFIDENCE and CONNECTION as being the 3 primary things that they are looking for.

So what is congruence? You told him certain things before and what you're going to tell them today is going to be congruent or in line with what you said previously. I don't want you to tell him the same stories over and over again unless they want to investigate a particular episode. Think of a new story that you can tell them that they haven't heard before. It's kind of like if you watch the same TV show over and over again, yeah, is familiar but you want to see a new episode after a while, right? Be prepared with the new episode. If they want to investigate further on something old, you can talk about the old episode that is attracted them to you with the question, but you can continue by saying, "You know, it reminds me of another time…" Thus you can introduce the new story.

Confidence. They want to look across from you and find someone that they don't have to worry about. If you are nervous, if you are bashful, if you act as though you will become a slave to them, if you don't interview with them like you are an adult talking with your peer, they're not going really feel confident in you. They're going to see you like you're relatively junior individual. I don't care if you actually look relatively junior individual or senior talent. The idea is you are talking to an equal.

I don't care if they are 30 years older than you, you want to be talking confidently with them without being arrogant, without being annoying, without acting like (I will talk to those of you in your 20s)… You know what it's like when you're being dismissed or being treated dismissive way. You don't want to instigate that with your behavior. They may have a bias that you pick up on but I want you to have the choice as to whether you join.

The 3rd “C” is connection. You want to connect with them and 1 of the best ways to do that is to speak to them with a smile on your face. Engage with them. "Does that make sense to you?" “Am I being clear enough?" “I just want to make sure I am not losing you here." Obviously, you don't asked this in obvious place where you wouldn't lose them; that is insulting to them. You know what it's like when you go off the rails a little bit you're not sure if you've lost them?

“I just want make sure you're following me here."

“Yeah yeah, I'm following you."

Connect with them. Talk with them like an equal. Smile at times. Putting twinkle in your eyes! You would have that sort of spirit in your eyes and your behavior. The more they talk, the more they like you. I'm going to speak with the senior people here. You might ask about the org structure and where you would fit in. What is the upside for the role? Who is going to know about your work? What kind of visibility will you have? Things along those lines.

When push comes to shove, obviously you have to demonstrate competence but going beyond that, you want to illustrate congruence with what you have told them before and maybe expand upon it a little bit, self-confidence, and make a connection with the people that you meet. These are the keys to a final interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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