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interview follow-up

When to Follow Up | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 946  Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains when to follow up after an interview and when to follow up on your résumé. 

Summary

So, you have a phone interview, you have had and in person interview, you haven't heard anything. When you check in with them?. When do you follow-up?

Ideally, during your interview, you asked the interviewer, "When do you think I might hear about next steps? What would next steps be in your process?" Asking the question accomplishes several things. 1st of all, it gives you a guideline. It gives you a sense of when you should follow up. So, if they say, "Where to finish this round of interviews in the next 5 days." Great! You know on day 6 or 7 it is appropriate to check in with them. Sometimes they will tell you that they had a cancellation or are not quite ready yet to make a decision. That's okay. What you're able to do is follow their timeline, check in with them, because you really have your permission to do so if they told you that there can be interviewing for another 4 or 5 days.

How should you follow-up?

There are several different ways to do this. 1st of all, you can send an email. The email is very simple. It basically says, "Hi! When we spoke, you mentioned that you would be making a decision about next steps in the next 4 or 5 days. I wanted to see whether you are ready to make that call (by using the word "call" I am using slang for "decision"). I am hoping to hear from you about next steps." Then sign off on it.

You can make a phone call. Again, if you leave voicemail, your voice has to be crisp. You can't just simply say, like you, making it up on the fly; it is almost like having an interview. You have to the script for yourself that basically says, "Hi! It's (fill in your name). We met about a week ago (we spoke about a week ago) , at which time you told me you might be making a decision around now about next steps and who would be invited back. I hope to hear from you. I would like to be part of that group that you invite back. Obviously, I'd like to be the person that you choose. Please call me at…" And leave your phone number 4 them. Real simple. Keep it simple and to the point.

In general, I want to be clear, I am not talking about calling on Monday morning at 9 AM. It is a horrible time to call. No one wants to hear from anyone. They're coming in off of the weekend and checking in with one another.

"Hi! How was your weekend?"
"Fine! How was your weekend?"
"Great! What did you do?"

It is all that obvious that the people do as a matter of normal course it in an office. Certainly a Monday late morning/Monday early afternoon is fine. Friday afternoons? Not good. People just trying to get out the door and spend some time with their families. Even if you're talking to someone in the restaurant business, Friday afternoons is a busy time for them. It goes into their we can schedule which is the busiest time. Avoid Friday afternoons. Monday morning at 9 AM? Not good. 10 AM or 10:30 AM? That is fine. , Do that.

One more thing. This isn't about following up on interview is just about following up in general. 1 of the most annoying things that people do is on Monday mornings at 8:30 AM, 9:15 AM,, early Monday mornings, they placed a phone call or send that email that says, "Hi! Anything going on?" Of course, there is. Come on. Give us a break.

If what you are trying to do is remind us that you're still looking for a position, be clean about it. Be honest about it. Just basically say, "we haven't spoken in a while. I just wanted to remind you that I am interesting and hope to hear from you about next steps.." It is really that simple.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

HR recruiter

I Haven’t Heard Back from the HR Recruiter | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 943 I have called and emailed the recruiter after the interview but have not heard back. What does this mean?

Summary

Here is today's question:

"After a phone screen, I emailed and left a voicemail for the recruiter and have not heard back.. What does this mean?"

I'll simply say I also don't know how much time has gone by since you did this. I'm going to give you a few options.

It's possible that you did so quickly after the phone interview that the recruiter hasn't heard back yet. That is the most probable scenario. The recruiter hasn't heard anything. That's because my experience is that when recruiter/when firms are ready to say no, they are very happy to let you know that you have been rejected. They don't want any additional phone calls.

Agency recruiters are different but corporate recruiters will let you know pretty quickly.Why? Because they want you to stop calling and if they want you to stop emailing.

Agency recruiters to it a little bit differently. They may tell you or they may just not respond, having the admin or voicemail take messages for them and never get back to you.

Here is another scenario. You have called and emailed and you week has gone by. You still haven't heard anything. What does that mean?

It may still mean that they haven't heard anything from the hiring manager who may be on vacation or have a serious project with a tight timeline or is just lazy and hasn't communicated anything yet OR, more likely, is just lazy and hasn't communicated that they are not interested.

Those are a few variations on how to answer that question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Jobs Go Dark


I discuss why you don’t hear anything from a company for long stretches of time.

Summary

This came as a suggestion from someone I was representing to talk about why you don't hear anything from firms for long stretches of time. Let me just share his experience.

I'm doing this recording in mid-September. I 1st represented him to a client of mine sometime in July. They responded by having them do a one-way video interview after an initial HR conversation. Then, nothing happened. A month and 1/2 or so goes by when nothing happens. Suddenly, they surface and go, "Hey! We would love to talk with you! Can we fly you out? Can we meet with you. We would love to have you talk with a few people one morning! How does your schedule look?" This happens much more often than you think.

I will also use the example of you doing an interview, to interviews, 3 interviews that there is nothing. No nothing.

What is going on? What is happening behind the scenes. Why are they not responding?

I 1st want to deal with the agency scenario where you have an agent representing you and they are the middleman between you and the company.

There are instances where the agent knows what is going on and isn't ready to share it with you. Why? It's because the firm is ready to communicate their decision or they want to manage you to the point where they want to get you another interview with different firm and then dropped the bomb that you're no longer under consideration... Or million 100 things like the client is saying, "We're not sure. There are 2 of people we want to see 1st." Delay delay delay. They don't want to let you know that the client is instantly enamored with you and isn't instantly ready to pull the trigger. They are 1 of 3 recruiters who is representing you, so they want to keep you on the hook. Those a typical agency scenarios.

Now, let's assume there is no buffer between you and the company. You've interview directly, they double the scheduling. You've done all the interviewing. Let's use the example of this person. What's going on behind the scenes?

Well, sometimes, as was the case here, a new C level executive joined, wanted to survey the landscape and then make a decision and they are not communicating with me. Actually, it's an unfair situation because that's another agency scenario. Did not communicating with me and I'm saying that I'm not hearing anything. That will be compacted to a communication situation.

Liken the situation that I was just outlining where on the recruiter than not communicating, so they may be going on a high level of their organization where they decide to reevaluate the requirement. I'm doing this in September every had one person be frozen on their interviews. He was flown out for meetings. He was clearly the number 1 person that they seen. They're coming up on October budgets. They are stalling a little bit in order to make sure that they have funding next year for the project that they want to hire him for. Position frozen. That took 3 weeks to do. Not terrible in terms of length like what this person went through, but 3 weeks is still long time to go without knowing what is going on.

Sometimes circumstances have changed for them; they are trying to manage their budget; there trying to see what is going on.

2. They are stalling for time. There stalling because they've already committed to seeing for the people and they are not prepared to commit to you. After all, Moses may walk in the door. Mohammed may arrive! The Buddha may walk in! Then the perfect individual to do this job (and would you want to hire the Buddha). Seriously. The Buddha walks in. You want to hire the Buddha right? That sometimes occurs. There stalling for time, or sometimes there stalling for time because you didn't really knock it out of the park. Their shopping for a better alternative. That's the most common scenario really as to what's really going on behind the scenes.

Sometimes, hiring manager has a lot of things to do. They really thought about what took place in your meeting with them for some time and they are bucking their own internal HR organization that is basically going, "Court you ready?. Don't you want to hire them? " After all, HR wants to close these jobs out as much as you want to join. The hiring managers just too busy to make a decision, let alone think about it.

Sometimes there are stalls that go on for that reason , OR they are trying to talk themselves into hiring you because they're just not sure. And they have to get over the hump in their waiting for magic words to be uttered to them that makes them go, "Okay. I'll do it."

Those are some of the reasons why jobs go dark. It doesn't make it any easier for you. But, understanding that, will make it easier for you to feel more comfortable.

1 of the tactics in response sometimes is to drop them a quick note and say, "A lot of time has gone by and I'm not trying to be difficult or push you, I just want to let you know my continued interest. Is there any way that we could talk further so I can help you resolve whatever doubts or questions you might have about me." This way, they will respond by going, "no, no! That's okay!" Or they will say, "Yeah. That's a good idea." Reaching out to them in that way can often be a good tactic.

To be clear, I'm not talking about a day later. I'm talking about a week, 2 weeks later and you are not hearing anything. You can drop them and noting give them a sense that you're open to talking with them again and what's your schedule like to schedule something for the 2 of you to speak. I'm sure you get some version of response.

And if you're working for a recruiter, contact them is the intermediary. They had these interest of closing you on the job and collecting the fee from the client. I'm sure they will advocate for you. If they're not willing to advocate for you, there is a message in that as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Jobs Go Dark | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 865 I discuss why you don’t hear anything from a company for long stretches of time after an interview.

Summary

This came as a suggestion from someone I was representing to talk about why you don't hear anything from firms for long stretches of time. Let me just share his experience.

I'm doing this recording in mid-September. I 1st represented him to a client of mine sometime in July. They responded by having them do a one-way video interview after an initial HR conversation. Then, nothing happened. A month and 1/2 or so goes by when nothing happens. Suddenly, they surface and go, "Hey! We would love to talk with you! Can we fly you out? Can we meet with you. We would love to have you talk with a few people one morning! How does your schedule look?" This happens much more often than you think.

I will also use the example of you doing an interview, to interviews, 3 interviews that there is nothing. No nothing.

What is going on? What is happening behind the scenes. Why are they not responding?

I 1st want to deal with the agency scenario where you have an agent representing you and they are the middleman between you and the company.

There are instances where the agent knows what is going on and isn't ready to share it with you. Why? It's because the firm is ready to communicate their decision or they want to manage you to the point where they want to get you another interview with different firm and then dropped the bomb that you're no longer under consideration... Or million 100 things like the client is saying, "We're not sure. There are 2 of people we want to see 1st." Delay delay delay. They don't want to let you know that the client is instantly enamored with you and isn't instantly ready to pull the trigger. They are 1 of 3 recruiters who is representing you, so they want to keep you on the hook. Those a typical agency scenarios.

Now, let's assume there is no buffer between you and the company. You've interview directly, they double the scheduling. You've done all the interviewing. Let's use the example of this person. What's going on behind the scenes?

Well, sometimes, as was the case here, a new C level executive joined, wanted to survey the landscape and then make a decision and they are not communicating with me. Actually, it's an unfair situation because that's another agency scenario. Did not communicating with me and I'm saying that I'm not hearing anything. That will be compacted to a communication situation.

Liken the situation that I was just outlining where on the recruiter than not communicating, so they may be going on a high level of their organization where they decide to reevaluate the requirement. I'm doing this in September every had one person be frozen on their interviews. He was flown out for meetings. He was clearly the number 1 person that they seen. They're coming up on October budgets. They are stalling a little bit in order to make sure that they have funding next year for the project that they want to hire him for. Position frozen. That took 3 weeks to do. Not terrible in terms of length like what this person went through, but 3 weeks is still long time to go without knowing what is going on.

Sometimes circumstances have changed for them; they are trying to manage their budget; there trying to see what is going on.

2. They are stalling for time. There stalling because they've already committed to seeing for the people and they are not prepared to commit to you. After all, Moses may walk in the door. Mohammed may arrive! The Buddha may walk in! Then the perfect individual to do this job (and would you want to hire the Buddha). Seriously. The Buddha walks in. You want to hire the Buddha right? That sometimes occurs. There stalling for time, or sometimes there stalling for time because you didn't really knock it out of the park. Their shopping for a better alternative. That's the most common scenario really as to what's really going on behind the scenes.

Sometimes, hiring manager has a lot of things to do. They really thought about what took place in your meeting with them for some time and they are bucking their own internal HR organization that is basically going, "Court you ready?. Don't you want to hire them? " After all, HR wants to close these jobs out as much as you want to join. The hiring managers just too busy to make a decision, let alone think about it.

Sometimes there are stalls that go on for that reason , OR they are trying to talk themselves into hiring you because they're just not sure. And they have to get over the hump in their waiting for magic words to be uttered to them that makes them go, "Okay. I'll do it."

Those are some of the reasons why jobs go dark. It doesn't make it any easier for you. But, understanding that, will make it easier for you to feel more comfortable.

1 of the tactics in response sometimes is to drop them a quick note and say, "A lot of time has gone by and I'm not trying to be difficult or push you, I just want to let you know my continued interest. Is there any way that we could talk further so I can help you resolve whatever doubts or questions you might have about me." This way, they will respond by going, "no, no! That's okay!" Or they will say, "Yeah. That's a good idea." Reaching out to them in that way can often be a good tactic.

To be clear, I'm not talking about a day later. I'm talking about a week, 2 weeks later and you are not hearing anything. You can drop them and noting give them a sense that you're open to talking with them again and what's your schedule like to schedule something for the 2 of you to speak. I'm sure you get some version of response.

And if you're working for a recruiter, contact them is the intermediary. They had these interest of closing you on the job and collecting the fee from the client. I'm sure they will advocate for you. If they're not willing to advocate for you, there is a message in that as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Jobs Go Dark | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/09/14/why-jobs-go-dark-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 865 I discuss why you don’t hear anything from a company for long stretches of time after an interview.

Summary

This came as a suggestion from someone I was representing to talk about why you don't hear anything from firms for long stretches of time. Let me just share his experience.

I'm doing this recording in mid-September. I 1st represented him to a client of mine sometime in July. They responded by having them do a one-way video interview after an initial HR conversation. Then, nothing happened. A month and 1/2 or so goes by when nothing happens. Suddenly, they surface and go, "Hey! We would love to talk with you! Can we fly you out? Can we meet with you. We would love to have you talk with a few people one morning! How does your schedule look?" This happens much more often than you think.

I will also use the example of you doing an interview, to interviews, 3 interviews that there is nothing. No nothing.

What is going on? What is happening behind the scenes. Why are they not responding?

I 1st want to deal with the agency scenario where you have an agent representing you and they are the middleman between you and the company.

There are instances where the agent knows what is going on and isn't ready to share it with you. Why? It's because the firm is ready to communicate their decision or they want to manage you to the point where they want to get you another interview with different firm and then dropped the bomb that you're no longer under consideration... Or million 100 things like the client is saying, "We're not sure. There are 2 of people we want to see 1st." Delay delay delay. They don't want to let you know that the client is instantly enamored with you and isn't instantly ready to pull the trigger. They are 1 of 3 recruiters who is representing you, so they want to keep you on the hook. Those a typical agency scenarios.

Now, let's assume there is no buffer between you and the company. You've interview directly, they double the scheduling. You've done all the interviewing. Let's use the example of this person. What's going on behind the scenes?

Well, sometimes, as was the case here, a new C level executive joined, wanted to survey the landscape and then make a decision and they are not communicating with me. Actually, it's an unfair situation because that's another agency scenario. Did not communicating with me and I'm saying that I'm not hearing anything. That will be compacted to a communication situation.

Liken the situation that I was just outlining where on the recruiter than not communicating, so they may be going on a high level of their organization where they decide to reevaluate the requirement. I'm doing this in September every had one person be frozen on their interviews. He was flown out for meetings. He was clearly the number 1 person that they seen. They're coming up on October budgets. They are stalling a little bit in order to make sure that they have funding next year for the project that they want to hire him for. Position frozen. That took 3 weeks to do. Not terrible in terms of length like what this person went through, but 3 weeks is still long time to go without knowing what is going on.

Sometimes circumstances have changed for them; they are trying to manage their budget; there trying to see what is going on.

2. They are stalling for time. There stalling because they've already committed to seeing for the people and they are not prepared to commit to you. After all, Moses may walk in the door. Mohammed may arrive! The Buddha may walk in! Then the perfect individual to do this job (and would you want to hire the Buddha). Seriously. The Buddha walks in. You want to hire the Buddha right? That sometimes occurs. There stalling for time, or sometimes there stalling for time because you didn't really knock it out of the park. Their shopping for a better alternative. That's the most common scenario really as to what's really going on behind the scenes.

Sometimes, hiring manager has a lot of things to do. They really thought about what took place in your meeting with them for some time and they are bucking their own internal HR organization that is basically going, "Court you ready?. Don't you want to hire them? " After all, HR wants to close these jobs out as much as you want to join. The hiring managers just too busy to make a decision, let alone think about it.

Sometimes there are stalls that go on for that reason , OR they are trying to talk themselves into hiring you because they're just not sure. And they have to get over the hump in their waiting for magic words to be uttered to them that makes them go, "Okay. I'll do it."

Those are some of the reasons why jobs go dark. It doesn't make it any easier for you. But, understanding that, will make it easier for you to feel more comfortable.

1 of the tactics in response sometimes is to drop them a quick note and say, "A lot of time has gone by and I'm not trying to be difficult or push you, I just want to let you know my continued interest. Is there any way that we could talk further so I can help you resolve whatever doubts or questions you might have about me." This way, they will respond by going, "no, no! That's okay!" Or they will say, "Yeah. That's a good idea." Reaching out to them in that way can often be a good tactic.

To be clear, I'm not talking about a day later. I'm talking about a week, 2 weeks later and you are not hearing anything. You can drop them and noting give them a sense that you're open to talking with them again and what's your schedule like to schedule something for the 2 of you to speak. I'm sure you get some version of response.

And if you're working for a recruiter, contact them is the intermediary. They had these interest of closing you on the job and collecting the fee from the client. I'm sure they will advocate for you. If they're not willing to advocate for you, there is a message in that as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I Haven’t Heard Back After My Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

Summary

The question is, "I haven't heard back from anyone after my interview. Should I email my recruiter or the interviewer? What are some tips I should know before I hear back from either 1 of them?"

Here is one observation-- I don't know you recently you did the interview. If you did it today and you haven't heard it by 4 o'clock it may just be too soon for them to get feedback. Also, I don't know what kind of recruiter this is. Are you talking about a corporate recruiter? Third-party recruiter? I'm going to try to address a lot of my contingencies with this answer but, in the meantime, let's work on this question..

I haven't heard back from anyone.. You obviously want to hear back. Here's the easiest way to hear back-- Knock their socks off. Blow everyone else out of the water. Impress the heck out of them so that they go, "Oh! We cannot let this person leave our offices. . We cannot let them leave our domicile without a job offer!

Obviously, this did not happen. So let's go on to the next scenario.

Sure I will email the recruiter or my interviewer? Let's start by looking at the recruiter. Corporate recruiter? Third-party recruiter? If you are introduced by a third-party recruiter, definitely contact them,,,, not the interviewer. If it is a corporate recruiter,, it depends on what the initial introduction was. If you are introduced by someone within the firm and the 1st interview that you did was with the hiring manager and then with the recruiter, go to the hiring manager 1st because you are introduced by someone to them..

If this was just, "I answered an ad. They called me and it was a good interview," contact the corporate recruiter.. They are really running point on the relationship with you. They may not have heard anything yet.

How can you get some feedback after the interview in order to hear back? The easiest thing to do is, at the end of the last meeting that you had, get a sense of their timeline.

When they asked, "So do you have any questions for us," go through a series of questions.. When they ask, "Is there anything else," ask them, "Could you give me a sense of your timeline for next steps? This way, I have reasonable expectations about what I might hear back from you. . I know it is not cast in stone. I know it may take a few days longer, . But, if., "You will hear from me tomorrow if it is good news,," and that is a week later, I know my answer. that's one thing.

Another way that you can do it is, when they ask, "Is there anything else,," ask, "What were your impressions of me today? What did you perceive my strengths to be? Where could I do better? And I compare with others that you've interviewed?"

You see, you are looking for feedback and you're waiting for them to call you with it, so it is either thumbs-up or thumbs down. There's not a lot of room in the middle. Every once in a while, you get a, "Were not sure about this guy." With time, that always turns into a rejection..

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Using A Surrogate (VIDEO)

To me, this was  an awful political season the United States. Between the primaries in the general election, we witnessed attacks and revelations by all the candidates that are absolutely miserable. In the past, politicians haven’t been a part of this, preferring instead a different way to attack their opponents.

There are often better ways to handle things than badgering a hiring manager.

Summary

Here's a lesson we can take from politicians and too few of us use it.  When politicians want to criticize someone, particularly presidential candidates, are they out there and not in their opponent… Well, this year it's a little bit different… But, traditionally, are they out there knocking their opponent or 2. They have a surrogate out there doing it for them?

Answer.  A Surrogate.

People in office, and usually a president, doesn't take time to criticize because it doesn't make them look "Presidential."  They have the Vice President do it for them. Politicians (again, this is been an exceptional year) usually have a surrogate do it for them. So, instead of Sec. Clinton criticizing Donald Trump, she sends out a surrogate like 1 of the people who has been working for the Clintons over the years.  These people go out there and do the dirty work. That's the traditional way to handle it.

For you as a job hunter or a marketing person following up on something, having a surrogate do it for you goes a long way toward making your hands look," clean," versus "dirty."  For example, you want to follow up and you have been introduced or knows someone in the organization.  Instead of reaching out directly to the hiring manager, have your surrogate, have the person you know who works there . Check behind the scenes and do it for you, instead of you doing it yourself.  Instead of putting the call in, and the recruiter who represented call them.

It's far better to do that than to go in there correctly.  Ultimately, if the surrogate does it for you. People may get annoyed at the surrogate, rather than you, so you still maintain the "halo" around the.  This will become important as time goes on.

So, I don't care if it's in job search, business development or sale situations, going behind the scenes and having a surrogate represent you goes much further toward maintaining your image and still getting results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Does It Mean When A Recruiter Calls And Asks If You Are Available for Feedback? (VIDEO)


Here’s a question from someone that proves that recruiters can’t win.

Summary

"What does it mean when a recruiter asks if you are available for a call to give you feedback?" Boy! This is a tough question!

You know, recruiters just can't do it right. Here, they want to know if you're available for a phone call to give you feedback. Job hunters also agonize over the fact that they don't get phone calls to receive feedback! So, what does it mean? Hmmm. It means that they want to know if you're available for a call so that they can give you feedback, dummy! I'm being obnoxious about it because it's a stupid question. They just want to know; it doesn't mean anything good. It doesn't mean anything bad.

The one thing out of the literal words that you might add on to them is that this is a courteous organization, particularly if they are telling you if you have been rejected. How many people complain (and this is third-party, and corporate recruiters) that they never get feedback??? Everyone goes through this experience! Everyone goes through that hell of no word back.

I know third-party recruiters go through with their clients, eventually, they get tired of saying, "We haven't heard anything back yet. I will let you know when I hear." Then, we never hear anything! We interpret that as being, "No interest." You interpreter lack of calling as being rudeness.

Well, I'll tell you, here we have a situation where firm is trying to be courteous, good or bad. Good – – they obviously want to move on to the next step, whatever that is. Bad – – they're going to tell you, mano a mano, mano a femo, femo a mano, femo a femo, whatever it is, they are going to tell you what their clients decision is! Maybe you can elicit "why." Please don't argue. If they tell you why you might ask some follow-up questions. If you are talking to a recruiter, there were really no more than what they are prepared to tell you and, if they do, this is what they believe they are sanctioned to say or else they have aggravation or they give their hiring manager aggravation. If they do that, they get in trouble.

Think back during the interview if you get a rejection and see whether the your experience correlates with what you are being told if this is a rejection. If it isn't a rejection, hey! You're on to the next step! If this was your 1st interview, you are on the your 2nd interview. If this was the 2nd interview, you are on to the 3rd. It could be that they are ready to make an offer. At least you know what the decision is and what their feedback is.

"What does it mean when a recruiter asks if you are available for a call to give you feedback?" Boy! This is a tough question!

You know, recruiters just can't do it right. Here, they want to know if you're available for a phone call to give you feedback. Job hunters also agonize over the fact that they don't get phone calls to receive feedback! So, what does it mean? Hmmm. It means that they want to know if you're available for a call so that they can give you feedback, dummy! I'm being obnoxious about it because it's a stupid question. They just want to know; it doesn't mean anything good. It doesn't mean anything bad.

The one thing out of the literal words that you might add on to them is that this is a courteous organization, particularly if they are telling you if you have been rejected. How many people complain (and this is third-party, and corporate recruiters) that they never get feedback??? Everyone goes through this experience! Everyone goes through that hell of no word back.

I know third-party recruiters go through with their clients, eventually, they get tired of saying, "We haven't heard anything back yet. I will let you know when I hear." Then, we never hear anything! We interpret that as being, "No interest." You interpreter lack of calling as being rudeness.

Well, I'll tell you, here we have a situation where firm is trying to be courteous, good or bad. Good – – they obviously want to move on to the next step, whatever that is. Bad – – they're going to tell you, mano a mano, mano a femo, femo a mano, femo a femo, whatever it is, they are going to tell you what their clients decision is! Maybe you can elicit "why." Please don't argue. If they tell you why you might ask some follow-up questions. If you are talking to a recruiter, there were really no more than what they are prepared to tell you and, if they do, this is what they believe they are sanctioned to say or else they have aggravation or they give their hiring manager aggravation. If they do that, they get in trouble.

Think back during the interview if you get a rejection and see whether the your experience correlates with what you are being told if this is a rejection. If it isn't a rejection, hey! You're on to the next step! If this was your 1st interview, you are on the your 2nd interview. If this was the 2nd interview, you are on to the 3rd. It could be that they are ready to make an offer. At least you know what the decision is and what their feedback is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

I Haven’t Heard Back After My Interview (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

Summary

The question is, "I haven't heard back from anyone after my interview. Should I email my recruiter or the interviewer? What are some tips I should know before I hear back from either 1 of them?"

Here is one observation-- I don't know you recently you did the interview. If you did it today and you haven't heard it by 4 o'clock it may just be too soon for them to get feedback. Also, I don't know what kind of recruiter this is. Are you talking about a corporate recruiter? Third-party recruiter? I'm going to try to address a lot of my contingencies with this answer but, in the meantime, let's work on this question..

I haven't heard back from anyone.. You obviously want to hear back. Here's the easiest way to hear back-- Knock their socks off. Blow everyone else out of the water. Impress the heck out of them so that they go, "Oh! We cannot let this person leave our offices. . We cannot let them leave our domicile without a job offer!

Obviously, this did not happen. So let's go on to the next scenario.

Sure I will email the recruiter or my interviewer? Let's start by looking at the recruiter. Corporate recruiter? Third-party recruiter? If you are introduced by a third-party recruiter, definitely contact them,,,, not the interviewer. If it is a corporate recruiter,, it depends on what the initial introduction was. If you are introduced by someone within the firm and the 1st interview that you did was with the hiring manager and then with the recruiter, go to the hiring manager 1st because you are introduced by someone to them..

If this was just, "I answered an ad. They called me and it was a good interview," contact the corporate recruiter.. They are really running point on the relationship with you. They may not have heard anything yet.

How can you get some feedback after the interview in order to hear back? The easiest thing to do is, at the end of the last meeting that you had, get a sense of their timeline.

When they asked, "So do you have any questions for us," go through a series of questions.. When they ask, "Is there anything else," ask them, "Could you give me a sense of your timeline for next steps? This way, I have reasonable expectations about what I might hear back from you. . I know it is not cast in stone. I know it may take a few days longer, . But, if., "You will hear from me tomorrow if it is good news,," and that is a week later, I know my answer. that's one thing.

Another way that you can do it is, when they ask, "Is there anything else,," ask, "What were your impressions of me today? What did you perceive my strengths to be? Where could I do better? And I compare with others that you've interviewed?"

You see, you are looking for feedback and you're waiting for them to call you with it, so it is either thumbs-up or thumbs down. There's not a lot of room in the middle. Every once in a while, you get a, "Were not sure about this guy." With time, that always turns into a rejection..

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

I Haven’t Heard Back After My Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 707 Should I email the recruiter or my interviewer? What are some tips in order to hear back after I email either one of them?

Summary

The question is, "I haven't heard back from anyone after my interview. Should I email my recruiter or the interviewer? What are some tips I should know before I hear back from either 1 of them?"

Here is one observation-- I don't know you recently you did the interview. If you did it today and you haven't heard it by 4 o'clock it may just be too soon for them to get feedback. Also, I don't know what kind of recruiter this is. Are you talking about a corporate recruiter? Third-party recruiter? I'm going to try to address a lot of my contingencies with this answer but, in the meantime, let's work on this question..

I haven't heard back from anyone.. You obviously want to hear back. Here's the easiest way to hear back-- Knock their socks off. Blow everyone else out of the water. Impress the heck out of them so that they go, "Oh! We cannot let this person leave our offices. . We cannot let them leave our domicile without a job offer!

Obviously, this did not happen. So let's go on to the next scenario.

Sure I will email the recruiter or my interviewer? Let's start by looking at the recruiter. Corporate recruiter? Third-party recruiter? If you are introduced by a third-party recruiter, definitely contact them,,,, not the interviewer. If it is a corporate recruiter,, it depends on what the initial introduction was. If you are introduced by someone within the firm and the 1st interview that you did was with the hiring manager and then with the recruiter, go to the hiring manager 1st because you are introduced by someone to them..

If this was just, "I answered an ad. They called me and it was a good interview," contact the corporate recruiter.. They are really running point on the relationship with you. They may not have heard anything yet.

How can you get some feedback after the interview in order to hear back? The easiest thing to do is, at the end of the last meeting that you had, get a sense of their timeline.

When they asked, "So do you have any questions for us," go through a series of questions.. When they ask, "Is there anything else," ask them, "Could you give me a sense of your timeline for next steps? This way, I have reasonable expectations about what I might hear back from you. . I know it is not cast in stone. I know it may take a few days longer, . But, if., "You will hear from me tomorrow if it is good news,," and that is a week later, I know my answer. that's one thing.

Another way that you can do it is, when they ask, "Is there anything else,," ask, "What were your impressions of me today? What did you perceive my strengths to be? Where could I do better? And I compare with others that you've interviewed?"

You see, you are looking for feedback and you're waiting for them to call you with it, so it is either thumbs-up or thumbs down. There's not a lot of room in the middle. Every once in a while, you get a, "Were not sure about this guy." With time, that always turns into a rejection..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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