Stupid Interview Mistakes: Crossing The Line (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter warned you about crossing the line on your next interview and how that can become so costly.

Summary

I want to spend a little time today cautioning you about crossing the line on your interviews. I'm reminded of this by something that happened on an interview that I arranged.

I had someone interviewing with a client of mine. He was on his fourth interview; he's on the home stretch; they live his background. The last person he interviewed with told him, "You're the only person of a I've interviewed who is qualified to do this job." He's having a great interview. They are yukking it up. They are having a great time with one another.

The phone interviewer asks him a question to answer and he answers, "I'll show it to you on the whiteboard when we meet."

Ding ding ding ding ding ding.

Answer the question.

You're having a good time with someone but you have to remember that they are there to evaluate and assess you. They interpreted that language as "not being willing to answer the question." He was rejected

This person who is the only individual under consideration for this role, the obvious front runner, no one else is being considered, and he blew it. He also got a little too "friendly" with his language at particular times using a profanity or two in the course of answering questions. That's what I was told.; I don't know if it was true or not.

When all is said and done, there is a line you cannot cross. At any point where they ask you a question, you have to answer it. You can't put it off because you are feeling so friendly with the interviewer that you lose track of the fact that they are not your friend and are there to evaluate and assess you. They are there to make a determination as to whether you are qualified for the job. As much as they may like you personally, you have to show that you can do the job.

Caveat emptor. Don't cross the line.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Body Language Mistakes– The Dour Look (VIDEO)

EP 733 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses this disturbing body language mistake too many people make.

Summary

Let's talk about 1 of those body language mistakes that by itself is not critical but has an adverse impact. That adverse impact is that even if they make you an offer, you can wind up costing you money. What's that thing that you're doing that might be expensive? What's that thing that you might be doing that could cost to the higher? It is lack of smiling that has an adverse impact.

I'm so the not suggesting that you signature interview with a goofy look on your face and say things like, "Wow! Everything is wonderful!" Nor am I suggesting that the entire interview should be done with a smile. At least in US culture, a person who smiles is seen as being self-confident. Appropriate smiling through out an interview suggests self-confidence. It suggests that you know what you're talking about or it that you're enjoying what the interviewer is saying or that you're enjoying what is going on.

It shouldn't be a pained smile or a big silly smile. You wanted to appear natural with the situation so that if you are listening to someone who is saying something slightly amusing you can have a range of smiles the illustrate your pleasure. Understand that firms don't just want to hire people who are competent to do the job. There are also trying to get a feel for you as a person and how you will fit in.

At least how it is in US centric culture, for most firms and there are obvious exceptions, they are also looking at people who they like personally as well as being competent. That's because firms have choices of competent people, right? So part of the way that you can stand out is with a smile. It is by enjoying yourself. It is by letting people know that you are a likable individual, rather than being perpetually dour.

You know – – looking sad or pained. Think of expressions like that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Body Language Mistakes– The Dour Look | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 733 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses this disturbing body language mistake too many people make.

Summary

Let's talk about 1 of those body language mistakes that by itself is not critical but has an adverse impact. That adverse impact is that even if they make you an offer, you can wind up costing you money. What's that thing that you're doing that might be expensive? What's that thing that you might be doing that could cost to the higher? It is lack of smiling that has an adverse impact.

I'm so the not suggesting that you signature interview with a goofy look on your face and say things like, "Wow! Everything is wonderful!" Nor am I suggesting that the entire interview should be done with a smile. At least in US culture, a person who smiles is seen as being self-confident. Appropriate smiling through out an interview suggests self-confidence. It suggests that you know what you're talking about or it that you're enjoying what the interviewer is saying or that you're enjoying what is going on.

It shouldn't be a pained smile or a big silly smile. You wanted to appear natural with the situation so that if you are listening to someone who is saying something slightly amusing you can have a range of smiles the illustrate your pleasure. Understand that firms don't just want to hire people who are competent to do the job. There are also trying to get a feel for you as a person and how you will fit in.

At least how it is in US centric culture, for most firms and there are obvious exceptions, they are also looking at people who they like personally as well as being competent. That's because firms have choices of competent people, right? So part of the way that you can stand out is with a smile. It is by enjoying yourself. It is by letting people know that you are a likable individual, rather than being perpetually dour.

You know – – looking sad or pained. Think of expressions like that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Body Language That Shows You Know Your Stuff | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 680 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to exhibit a form of body language that presents you as an expert.

Summary

I want to give you a body language tip today that will help you present yourself in a very authoritative and very powerful way. When most people go on an interview they feel a little revved up. If the role, it's important, it's their career. Or they go the exact opposite route and become a little hesitant.

What I learned a long time ago (you don't know me from when I was much younger so you don't know this about me). There was a point where he spoke very quickly with a lot of intensity. It was just how I felt and conducted myself at that time as part of my behavior of youth.

What I learned over the course of time is that if you want to sound in command, it if you want to send authoritative you don't need to speak quickly. If anything what you need to do is speak with certainty and with purpose and slow your speech down. In addition, lower your voice a bit. So instead of speaking a mile a minute and going on and on and on about whatever the question is, what you do is slow down a little bit and start talking, not as loudly but with certainty and firmness in her voice.

This is a skill that may require practice on the part. It may not be intuitive. However, if you think of the times in your life where you been in complete command, you haven't been going a mile a minute. What you been doing is speaking with the force that comes with your presence, bearing and command that allows people to know with certainty that you know what you're talking about.

That's a way to conduct yourself on an interview. Not as a hyperactive 8-year-old but with the firmness… I'm not saying that you conduct the entire interview this way, but their points we can talk about your experience where the ideal thing is to say, "When I walked into this organization, these were some of the challenges that we faced." You start listing the individual items.

Then very calmly and with a lot of certainty and complete conviction, speak about what you did to resolve the issues.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Start Your 7 Day Free Trial of JobSearchCoachingHQ.com

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

 

Body-Language-Mistakes

Body Language Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 638 Things can wrong fast if you make any (or all) of these mistakes. 

 

Summary

Body language is often misunderstood by job hunters who think it is a way to hypnotize people into hiring them for jobs that they are not qualified for. Follow the pen. You're getting drowsier and drowsier! You get the idea. It doesn't work that way.

The way it works is that your behaviors are either congruent in emphasizing the points that you are trying to make or incongruent. And, as a result, you turn off people. I'm using 2 exaggerations. The 1st 1 is congruent; the 2nd 1 is incongruent. I may be speaking very calmly but time flailing my arms to illustrate incongruent behavior. I want to highlight a few of these behaviors that you just need to be aware of so that in this way, you don't shoot yourself in the foot and hurt your candidacy.

The 1st one is fidgeting. Have you ever talk to just someone who is bouncing around, they're just all over the place and they're just driving you crazy by fidgeting all the time? Fidgeting is a turnoff. Don't do it. If you're feeling nervous, better to use your hands to emphasize points, but never block your face.

The next thing is what is called pointing or chopping. It they are hard, demonstrative gestures that really want to be exaggerating what you are saying versus something that I use all the time when I speak, using your hands to emphasize things. Never go across your face under any circumstances. Never should your hands frame in your face. There are very few circumstances (and most of you would feel comfortable exercising them). Don't do the strong exaggerated kinds of things that look too aggressive.

Your posture needs to appear confident.. Rather than sitting in the chair hunched over looking bored and disinterested, or the reverse, appearing too cocky and looking as though you don't have a care in the world and the person who you're talking with is an idiot, just be aware of your posture because both extremes can be costly.

You don't want to break, eye contact and talk every which way. If the person is profoundly ugly, you want to talk to either the immediate left side and right side of their face. You want to appear as though you are maintaining eye contact, even when you are. You want to do it with one stipulation – – you don't want to look as though you are staring. People who stare look like they are crazy. No one wants to hire a crazy person who was staring at them. The one who looks like they are never going to blink.

The last one I'm going to bring up is keeping your arms folded. More often than not, folding your arms is done by individuals who are "closed" or, "withdrawn." Sometimes it is done by people who are overweight and find it hard to sit in the chair. Rather than do that, again, keep your hands in front of you or to the side framing your body, that will go a long way toward avoiding being misunderstood.

Again, being hired isn't done because because you've done or not done this. You need to have the skills to do the job and create trust and rapport with the interviewer that you are the solution to what they are looking for. However, if your behavior is a turnoff, there is no way you're going to get a job.

in him him and him him him and him him him him him him him him him and him him him

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and  leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

7 DAY FREE TRIAL WHEN YOU JOIN

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Body Language Mistakes | Job Search Radio

badpostureThings can wrong fast if you make any (or all) of these mistakes.

 

Summary

Body language is often misunderstood by job hunters who think this is a way to hypnotize people into hiring them for jobs are not qualified for (Follow the pen.  You are getting drowsy and drowsier).  It doesn’t work that way.

Your behavior is either congruent and emphasizes the points that you are trying to make or in-congruent and, as a result, you turn off people. In one example, I might be speaking very calmly  yet flailing my arms.  I want to highlight a few of the behaviors you might engage in so that you become aware of them and don’t shoot yourself in the foot and damaged candidacy.

The 1st one is fidgety. Have you ever spoken to some of his just bouncing around, all over the place, and they are just driving you crazy! Fidgeting is a turnoff. Be conscious of when you might do it and stop!  If you are feeling nervous, It is better to use your hands to emphasize points, but never block your face.

The next one is what’s called in the business pointing or chopping– – Hard, demonstrative gestures that really wind up exaggerating what you are saying versus emphasizing things with your hands. Never go across your face with your hands under any circumstances.  You shouldn’t use your hands to frame your face (There are very few circumstances where someone can get away doing that).  Instead, keep your gestures lower if you’re going to use your hands to emphasize points.  Don’t do the strong aggressive things to emphasize what you are saying and risk turning people off by feeling threatened.

Your posture needs superior confident.  Rather than sitting in a chair hunched over, slumping over in the chair looking bored and disinterested, or the reverse, appearing to cocky, looking as though you don’t have a care in the world sitting with one arm over the back of the chair and treating the person that you speaking with as though they are an idiot, be aware of your posture because both extremes can be costly.

You don’t want to break eye contact and just talk every which way; you always want to appear as though you are maintaining eye contact.  In doing so, you can’t look like you are staring.  People who appear to be staring are received as though they are crazy.  No one wants to hire a crazy person who is staring at them.You know, like the one who never looks like they are going to blink.

If the person is profoundly ugly, talk to just the right or just the left side of their face.  Most people will be able to tell that you’re not looking them in the eye.

The last one I’m going to bring up is keeping your arms folded. The way keeping your arms fall that is interpreted is that you are closed or withdrawn, or, if you are overweight it is hard to sit in the chair, I know, there is a tendency to fold arms in front of you.  Instead, keep your arms in fern of you or to the sides, framing your body.  That will go a long way toward dispelling what could be a misinterpretation of what you are communicating.

Again, being hired will be because you’ve done this, but because you have the skills to do the job and have created trust and rapport with the interviewer that you are the solution to what they are looking for.  However, if your behavior is a turnoff, there is no way you’re going to get the job.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Body Language to Show You’re Thinking of An Answer

In this video, I show you how to seem like your thinking of answers to questions when in fact you are well-prepared and rehearsed to answer them.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

Reading the Interviewer’s Body Language

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out some body language clues to look for when you are interviewing. He also points out a way to try to reconnect with the interviewer if you are not connecting.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

Still More Body Language Advice

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers more of his ideas about correct body language on a job interview.

———————————————————————————————————

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

Eye Contact

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses both proper and improper eye contact during a job interview.

——————————————————————————————————–

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

 

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