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Stupid Interview Mistakes Criticizing The Past (VIDEO)

Stupid Interview Mistakes Criticizing The Past (VIDEO)

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaARCzg1vjI[/svp]
In this video, I talk about another 1 of those dumb things that people do on interviews – – criticizing the past.

 

[spp-transcript]

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

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7 thoughts on “Stupid Interview Mistakes Criticizing The Past (VIDEO)

  1. This is nice but it’s a strawman argument.
    We’re all at the top of our nervousness range in interviews, especially in
    person interviews, and I have heard this meme for ever. I’ve never
    encountered it nor did any of my coworkers ever mention it. It’s far more
    likely that an interviewer goes through every single job you’ve ever had
    and asks what you did, why you left, and would they rehire you. I’ve
    personally known interviewers that would purposely keep asking questions
    until you burst into tears to see where your breaking point is (he was
    brought in on purpose for this during interviews).
    You can dance around hard times in your resume or you can simply plow
    through it. Simple responses such as “the company was laying off and I had
    little seniority”, or “I liked the job but my manager and I didn’t get
    along” should be sufficient. Silence rather than chatter should be the
    response to probing questions.
    Employers will sometimes in best Khmer Rouge style assemble the employees
    and have everyone answer “what sucks about this place” so they can identify
    the dissenters and fire them afterwards. This carries over on interviews-
    decide for yourself if you want to work for a place that is that insecure
    🙂

    Jeff – no offense but lose that hat, no one cares about your hairline

  2. This is nice but it’s a strawman argument.
    We’re all at the top of our nervousness range in interviews, especially in person interviews, and I have heard this meme for ever. I’ve never encountered it nor did any of my coworkers ever mention it. It’s far more likely that an interviewer goes through every single job you’ve ever had and asks what you did, why you left, and would they rehire you. I’ve personally known interviewers that would purposely keep asking questions until you burst into tears to see where your breaking point is (he was brought in on purpose for this during interviews).
    You can dance around hard times in your resume or you can simply plow through it. Simple responses such as “the company was laying off and I had little seniority”, or “I liked the job but my manager and I didn’t get along” should be sufficient. Silence rather than chatter should be the response to probing questions.
    Employers will sometimes in best Khmer Rouge style assemble the employees and have everyone answer “what sucks about this place” so they can identify the dissenters and fire them afterwards. This carries over on interviews- decide for yourself if you want to work for a place that is that insecure 🙂

    Jeff – no offense but lose that hat, no one cares about your hairline

  3. This is nice but it’s a strawman argument.
    We’re all at the top of our nervousness range in interviews, especially in person interviews, and I have heard this meme for ever. I’ve never encountered it nor did any of my coworkers ever mention it. It’s far more likely that an interviewer goes through every single job you’ve ever had and asks what you did, why you left, and would they rehire you. I’ve personally known interviewers that would purposely keep asking questions until you burst into tears to see where your breaking point is (he was brought in on purpose for this during interviews).
    You can dance around hard times in your resume or you can simply plow through it. Simple responses such as “the company was laying off and I had little seniority”, or “I liked the job but my manager and I didn’t get along” should be sufficient. Silence rather than chatter should be the response to probing questions.
    Employers will sometimes in best Khmer Rouge style assemble the employees and have everyone answer “what sucks about this place” so they can identify the dissenters and fire them afterwards. This carries over on interviews- decide for yourself if you want to work for a place that is that insecure 🙂

    Jeff – no offense but lose that hat, no one cares about your hairline

  4. +Maurice Levie i have a shaved head and that is a hairline I like and choose. The hat minimizes glare from overhead light in winter on my glasses and head.

  5. +Maurice Levie i have a shaved head and that is a hairline I like and choose. The hat minimizes glare from overhead light in winter on my glasses and head.

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