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Is It OK To Take Notes During The Interview? (VIDEO)

Is It OK To Take Notes During The Interview? (VIDEO)

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZe4lcy79YQ[/svp]
You want to remember what you told but is it okay to take notes? That’s what I answer in this video.

[spp-tweet tweet=”What’s the message you’re giving when you focus on note-taking and not on the interviewer?”]

[spp-transcript]

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

7 thoughts on “Is It OK To Take Notes During The Interview? (VIDEO)

  1. I always make notes, I always carry a bottle of water with me and I never
    ask if “it’s ok”. I would rate the interviewer as a failure if they are not
    taking notes, and if they don’t have a copy of my portfolio in front of
    them then it’s been a waste of both our time. Any interview should follow
    the plot of past, present, and future, with the job they are selling you on
    as the future. That’s right – they are selling you on the job, not the
    other way around.

  2. I always make notes, I always carry a bottle of water with me and I never ask if “it’s ok”. I would rate the interviewer as a failure if they are not taking notes, and if they don’t have a copy of my portfolio in front of them then it’s been a waste of both our time. Any interview should follow the plot of past, present, and future, with the job they are selling you on as the future. That’s right – they are selling you on the job, not the other way around.

  3. I always make notes, I always carry a bottle of water with me and I never ask if “it’s ok”. I would rate the interviewer as a failure if they are not taking notes, and if they don’t have a copy of my portfolio in front of them then it’s been a waste of both our time. Any interview should follow the plot of past, present, and future, with the job they are selling you on as the future. That’s right – they are selling you on the job, not the other way around.

  4. Maurice, I think it depends on the interviewer. The president of a large Manpower franchise (Phil Blair, the author of the book “Job Won”)  has an interview on YouTube. From 14:50-15:39, he said that he likes it when job candidates take notes. He said that it is a sign of respect and it shows that the candidate is taking the situation seriously. Personally,   I’m in my mid 40’s and I’ve never taken notes during an interview until last week. The hiring manager was saying a lot of interesting things that I didn’t want to forget. I did NOT write down every word she said, just the highlights. She didn’t seem to mind, but perhaps she did, because I haven’t heard anything back yet. Like I said on one of Jeff’s other videos; there is sooooo much tip-toeing around in this process. I wish the hiring process would go back to being about our qualifications and not how good we are at being one of the cool kids.  When I’m being interrogated and judged during my job interviews, I feel like saying, … _”Your ad says that you need a receptionist. I’ve been one for 17 years. Do you want my help or not?!?!”_  LOL!!! Of course, I would not do that, but it would feel good to say it at least once. 🙂

  5. Maurice, I think it depends on the interviewer. The president of a large Manpower franchise (Phil Blair, the author of the book “Job Won”)  has an interview on YouTube. From 14:50-15:39, he said that he likes it when job candidates take notes. He said that it is a sign of respect and it shows that the candidate is taking the situation seriously. Personally,   I’m in my mid 40’s and I’ve never taken notes during an interview until last week. The hiring manager was saying a lot of interesting things that I didn’t want to forget. I did NOT write down every word she said, just the highlights. She didn’t seem to mind, but perhaps she did, because I haven’t heard anything back yet. Like I said on one of Jeff’s other videos; there is sooooo much tip-toeing around in this process. I wish the hiring process would go back to being about our qualifications and not how good we are at being one of the cool kids.  When I’m being interrogated and judged during my job interviews, I feel like saying, … _”Your ad says that you need a receptionist. I’ve been one for 17 years. Do you want my help or not?!?!”_  LOL!!! Of course, I would not do that, but it would feel good to say it at least once. 🙂

  6. It would be an immediate walk off the lot if that was a commendable trait. I interview them as much as they do me. Limp handshakes are a huge red flag that conveys indifference, and in several cases was the antidote I needed.
    Nowadays the job interviews can be split by whether the hiring is done by job fit or cultural fit. I excel in job fit interviews but cultural fit until recently required massive investment of time and some companies with low turnover just didn’t have a visibility online.
    Last but not least, the not having your resume in hand interview is doomed from the start and I just cringe. You mailed it, you went through the ATS, HR has a copy and now you can’t be bothered? Epic fail

  7. It would be an immediate walk off the lot if that was a commendable trait. I interview them as much as they do me. Limp handshakes are a huge red flag that conveys indifference, and in several cases was the antidote I needed.
    Nowadays the job interviews can be split by whether the hiring is done by job fit or cultural fit. I excel in job fit interviews but cultural fit until recently required massive investment of time and some companies with low turnover just didn’t have a visibility online.
    Last but not least, the not having your resume in hand interview is doomed from the start and I just cringe. You mailed it, you went through the ATS, HR has a copy and now you can’t be bothered? Epic fail

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