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Why You Lose Potential New Hires (VIDEO)


In this video I discuss how employers lose potential employees that they wanted to hire.

Summary

I thought I would do something for employers, hiring managers to help you understand why you lose potential new hires that you really want to bring on board. It really starts off with a couple of things that float around the kind of build on themselves.

First of all, you have unrealistic expectations and then construct incomplete/inaccurate/over-the-top job descriptions they could make it really hard for you to get to people who you would want to hire in the 1st place.

You take too long in the selection process. Why? Not everyone is on board with what they are assigned to look for. As a result, some people are screaming against their idea of what is being sought versus your idea of what you need is. Thus, there is confusion. Sometimes in the attempted rigorous process. You don't tell the person who is going to be screening for you what you want them to screen for. As a result, when someone magically makes it through this over interviewed process, they are turned off. They don't really like what their experience has been. No one has sold them on the opportunity at any point and, if they have, it hasn't been repeatedly reinforced, nor the person reminded of it throughout the process. They forget because it happened so long ago.

Thus, from the job hunter perspective, you have had too many cooks pounding them from different directions. You may say, "So what? We are learning!" Yet, when you are hiring someone, everything that you are doing, just like everything they are doing creates an image. You are asking to get it passed, but you wouldn't give a job Hunter repass if they did that to you, right?

You have to reconstruct your approach to this by shortening the hiring process, getting clear about what you are looking for, making it clear to everyone who is involved in the process what you want them to evaluate for . . . Do you follow that?

You try to do all this and is concise and manner as is possible and as few visits as possible because, even in down markets, you are competing with other firms that are looking for talent. If the other firm is streamlining the process as many firms are, then, you will be coming in late. You are coming in after someone else has already done a better job of "selling" them.

When you over interview, when you are not clear with everyone about what you want them to assess for, it is like going to a bad party (at least from a job hunter's perspective). They are in the center of the circle and everyone is taking shots at them and they have no idea what is going on.

When you finally extended offer, (1) you are now competing with people and (2) as a result of your firm's terrible behavior during the process, they have been undersold on the opportunity and no relationship has really been built with the job hunter, (3) you are now susceptible to a counteroffer from their current employer. After all that work, after all that effort, you lose them because your process stank.

I just want to encourage you to follow some of the suggestions I have made here. Don't over interview. Get clear about what it is you are looking for. Think in terms of "reasonable expectations" and get everyone on board with what it is THEY, in particular, will be involved with interviewing and assessing for. No more. No less..

When they give you feedback (and this is a big part of it), "Are they qualified?" Once you meet them and use that information that you have gotten from others, I want you to think of how they might relate to the people in your current organization without using the word, "fit." After all, you do want diversity, not just simply from a racial, religious, or cultural perspective, you want diversity of thought, don't you? You want people who see problems differently so that you receive multiple perspectives.

Too often, it is used, to inject bias into the process and, worse than that, create a "me, too" culture where everyone agrees with one another and you are only receiving one viewpoint.

So, I just want to offer you a few of these reasons why you lose job applicants that you have worked so hard to evaluate and have wanted to hire. They are so easily correctable.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

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2 thoughts on “Why You Lose Potential New Hires (VIDEO)

  1. I once attended a 4 hour ‘gang bang’ interview in 30 minute increments
    without a break. At the 3 hour mark, I stopped the interviewing so I could
    drink water from their fountain and take a bio break. They seemed incensed
    by this and then tried to rush the remainder. Never gonna happen again. You
    correctly identify the cluelessness that is part of distributed and
    outsourced job interviews these days. In down markets this is especially
    bad, so these days I put an artificial deadline on conversations and simply
    state that I took the counter offer. When asked why, I reply I NEED TO STAY
    BILLABLE

  2. I once attended a 4 hour ‘gang bang’ interview in 30 minute increments without a break. At the 3 hour mark, I stopped the interviewing so I could drink water from their fountain and take a bio break. They seemed incensed by this and then tried to rush the remainder. Never gonna happen again. You correctly identify the cluelessness that is part of distributed and outsourced job interviews these days. In down markets this is especially bad, so these days I put an artificial deadline on conversations and simply state that I took the counter offer. When asked why, I reply I NEED TO STAY BILLABLE

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