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Who Should You Network With to Find a Job?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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The great cartoon we used was provided by Humoresque Cartoons.

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