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What Would Your Current Manager Say You Need to Work On? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

What Would Your Current Manager Say You Need to Work On? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 766 A podcast listener wrote asking the question. I can’t believe I missed this one.

Summary

Someone wrote to me with the question and Jason, I can't believe I missed this question somewhere along the line! I appreciate that you asked it and let me covered for you.

The question is, "What would your current manager say you need to improve on?"

When you think about this question for moment, is not really any different than the question about what your weaknesses are. Let's view it in that way. It's a way that they want to elicit what your weaknesses are. As I said in an earlier video on the subject, I think the best way to address the weaknesses is not by saying things like, "I sometimes worked too hard." It doesn't work. It's 1 of those canned answers that basically show immaturity.

Here's a far better one that I offer in the weaknesses video. "I think if you call my manager, what he or she (depending upon gender, of course) would probably point to is I sometimes get down on myself and that I am a hard critic. I really work hard to improve upon that and I hate making mistakes. I read. I learn. I really work hard at improving and that's great. What they think I should improve upon is focusing on my strengths, rather than my weaknesses all the time. You see, their thinking is, and I think the right about this, is that most people have areas of their background where they are not going to really get a lot better. So, using an example of myself, I wrestle with (and this is an example. I used in the other video is about) I don't think I'll ever be a mobile app developer. I just don't have the time. I just don't have the patience, etc.. However, I have certain strengths that other people don't have that if I really try to hold those improve upon them by fractional percentages they really think that I would be extraordinary. If there is one area that I can improve upon, their thinking is that should really focus in on..." And then you talk about 1 or 2 of your strengths.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

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