How Can They Catch You Bluffing? (VIDEO)


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How do recruiters and HR experts catch someone in a bluff during salary negotiations? What will you do to find out their real baseline?

Summary

I shorten the question for the title. The full question is, "How can recruiters and HR professionals catch someone in a bluff during salary negotiations? What would you do to find out there will baseline? "

I'm going to start with the 2nd question 1st. Part of how it is done is that you tell us. From the time of the 1st conversation until the time an offer is going to be extended, you been saying certain things. In the 1st conversation, you may be asked, "How much are you currently earning? How much are you looking for? Do you have anything else going on? What is the rock-bottom base salary, exclusive of bonus that you find acceptable to join the staff of the firm?" Recruiters might ask questions like that in the 1st conversation.

From there, as interviews progress, I recruiter might ask questions that test what is going on with you. "Do you have anything else going on? Where is that in the process?" Here's the real thing you can't head off – – we know much of the behavior that other firms engage in.

You see, recruiters have a pulse on the market for a long time and you are just a novice stepping in. For example, if you say that you are earning $95,000 or $125,000 , and are expecting an offer of $140,000 if you are making $95,000, we think to ourselves, "Sniff sniff. I smell bullshit." That's because firms tend not to do that. They try to get firms for the least amount rather than the most amount confirms just don't give out 50% raises.

So, you are telling us a lot of stuff along the way that allows us to detect BS. Then, from there comes "the wild offer" that is completely out of bounds with reality. I will give you an example of why think it is a wild offer. And $95,000 your person does not do the same work as a $140,000 your person. A $140,000 year person does not do the same work is a $200,000, per year person. Get where I'm coming from?

Organizations have similar, although not identical, wage structures, where they pay for certain tasks. If you are an assistant director or a director in an organization, you tend to be slotted in a certain bandwidth. As such, when you are taking this dramatic increase, from one bad to something that is radically different, we smell BS.

You are telling us a bunch of stuff along the way that allows us to know that you are bluffing.

The classic bluff is, "I have another offer. I need a decision by 4 o'clock this afternoon."

"What's the other offer for? What's keeping you from accepting it? What are you waiting for our offer for if that one is so good?" You better have an answer for that one because that's the ultimate bluff that most people fail at.

"I will take the other offer. It is a good one. I'd like yours better."

"Why do you like our position better?"

What they are doing is extracting from you why you should turn down the other offer.

Like I said at the beginning, you give us a lot of information in the course of interviewing, in the course of conversations, that exposes lies. That tells recruiters, both corporate and third-party, that something is not quite right. Coupled with their own knowledge of the market, it is hard to get away with stuff.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Working With a Recruiter (VIDEO)


People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Are You Actively Interviewing?


How do I answer when a recruiter asks me “Are you actively interviewing, and do you have any deadlines, pending offers, etc.?”

salary-negotiation

Summary

How do you answer the question, "Are you actively interviewing?  

What are they really trying to find out?"

There are a few ways to answer this question based upon where you are in your job search.

If you have been out of work for 6 months and they asked this question, they are tossing you a lifeline. After all, if it is been 6 months that you've been out of work, they are thinking that there was something wrong with you. It gives you a chance to say, "I took a few months off. I never did that at any point in my life before that. The kids have grown up. I decided to take it a little easy.  It's time for me to get back to work."  That's the way to answer the question if there is been a period of time where you been out of work.

If They Recruited You . . .

Let's work with the assumption that they are recruiting you and they asked this question.  Then, the purpose of the question is very different than when asked of the person is been out of work for 6 months.

Here, they are trying to figure out whether (1) you are out interviewing and where you are in your job search. (2) I've had people who contacted me about position side advertised for, and they have 3 job offers and expect my client to jump through hoops to compete with those other offers in one day. after one meeting that lasts for 1 minute.

It doesn't work that way. You went out on a bunch of dates before you decide to get married, right? Employers are no different.

The implication for the person who was recruited and is asked this question is to figure out whether we were lucky enough to just find you and your background fits the job or did we stumble across someone who is actively interviewing and is been on 27 different interviews… You get the idea.

The correct way to answer if you have been on a few interviews is to say, "Yes, I have been on a few interviews recently."

"Where are you in your search?"

"I don't think I'm close to an offer. I have had firsts and seconds at a few places. Firms seem interested, but I don't have any offers yet and no one is talking to me like I am getting one yet. That's a good way to deflect the question.

Now, if you are close to an offer, from the recruiter's perspective, they are thinking, "Why should I invest time in this person when I not going to make any money or my client will take too long for this person and their timetable. I know this hiring manager can take a month to even decide to interview this person."  On and on and on.

From the standpoint of the employer-recruiter, based upon what they know of the hiring manager, they are trying to figure out whether they have the time to get you into the process and bring it to a successful end.

If you say something like, "I have a few things I seem to be on final rounds for but I don't have any job offers yet"

"What would keep you from accepting an offer from 1 of those firms?"

"Well, money, of course. After all, I'm not looking to take a lateral or less. If they offer too little, I'm not going to join."

"How much would you be looking for?"

"Well, that depends upon the opportunity. I obviously want to contribute to an organization . . . "

I'm trying to give you a sense of the flow of the conversation as you answer questions.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

 

What Happens to My Resume After It Is Submitted to a Job Posting? (VIDEO)


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Here’s how the sausage is made.

Summary

The question I received was, "What happens to my resume after it is received for a job post?" This is like the sausage and how it is made. It is really an ugly process.

Once you've submitted it to a job posting, there are now 2 possibilities. One is when you've submitted through an applicant tracking system; the other one is when it asked to the email a resume. Smaller firms might not have the systems in place and you are emailing a resume.

The applicant tracking system is a filter. It parses your resume and inputs data into their system and may or may not, depending upon the system, score your resume based upon your use of keywords to determine whether or not you are a POSSIBLE FIT. I want to be clear. POSSIBLE FIT.

It is not perfect, obviously, and depending upon the scoring system and how it has been set up, and how the dictionary of terms has been created to evaluate, you may or may not be passed on to THE FIRST HUMAN BEING. Often in corporations and with the search firm that person is representing that business area or that hiring manager who is attempting to fill the position. They are doing a visual scan. Again, if you came in through an applicant tracking system, some systems will never let you get that far because if they are seeing you doing "serial applying" as 1 of my guests on Job Search Radio described or you are applying to lots of different disparate jobs, they are just going to block you and never let that resume get through even if you might be qualified because they have identified that behavior as being reflective of (please excuse my language) bullshit artists.

Assuming that that is not you and you're getting to the 1st level human being who is there to check, with some organizations that could be the hiring manager. Most of the time, it is HR. With smaller firms, it is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes. That's the reality to it. It is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes because the owner was busy. "You look at the resumes and show me the ones of the people who think fit." That person makes a determination and passes it to the hiring manager or, if it is a search firm or an HR person, they are going to do the 1st screen.

Ultimately, systems are there to save time and, obviously, they are not perfect. They do a lot better as a time-saver then you as a job hunter would prefer that they do. You are applying to jobs because you think they are right.

Now, in some organizations, HR is not even going to interview you on till the hiring manager says to do so. "I want to talk to that person." You are dealing with the ladies all the time, because your resume is going from the applicant tracking system to HR to a hiring manager for home hiring is only 1 of their priorities; they have a job to do. As a result, they are not there sitting by their computer instantly giving responses. They are looking when they have some time. Sometimes that is on their commute. Sometimes it is when they need to take a break. Sometimes it is when they schedule something on your calendar to review resumes. They are trying to work it into their day when they have time that they can take away from their "real job." That is the way they think about. Taking time away from their "real job."

Your resume is an interruption. They may wait for the weekend to review a bunch of resumes. They may wait so the evening. They may wait for their commute. Whatever it is, they are not instantly looking at your resume.

That is what goes on behind the scenes from a process perspective. Some systems may send you questionnaires; some recruiters, both HR and agency recruiters, may send questionnaires to clarify particular parts of your background because your resume wasn't clear enough to them answer those questions because you are not going to get to the interview otherwise.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What Does It Mean When They Say “We Have a Finalist And Are Moving to an Offer” (VIDEO)


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As usual, I answer this in a no BS kind of way.

Summary

Here, I have a question from someone that I think is a great question. What does it mean when they say, "We have a finalist and are moving to an offer?"

My answer is very simple. You didn't get the job. They have chosen someone else. The result winds up being that for now, unless you vest a follow-up question, you don't know if you're the 2nd place finisher or the 22nd Pl. finisher.

It doesn't mean that this person has accepted a job offer. They are going to be making an offer to this person. For now, you are out of luck. You didn't get the job. It is really that simple. They have said explicitly. "We have a finalist." If it were you, they would tell you that you are the winner and that they were making you an offer soon. They didn't say that. They are moving to an offer and they are politely letting you down now because they think they will have an acceptance.

What you could have done and can still do is call the recruiter involved in say, "Do you know, if I finish 2nd or further back?" In this way, you can see if there is any hope. Lord knows, firms do make bad offers that are turned down.

The fact of the matter is you are out of luck here and you have to keep looking.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Do executive search firms looking unsolicited resumes?

Do Executive Search Firms Look at ‘Unsolicited’ Resumes (VIDEO)


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Unsolicited resumes. Do they look or ignore?

Summary

The question for today is, "Do executive search firms look at unsolicited resumes?" The way the question was originally phrased was, "Are executive search firms even looking at unsolicited resumes they get sent to them?"

You have to understand how the search business has evolved. It's history involves never looking at unsolicited resume. However, there might be someone in the office who parses unsolicited resumes; they have software that's going to input resumes that appeal to them into their system. There is this thing that you may have heard of called LinkedIn . . That part of the business is very data oriented. They are not looking for job hunters; they are looking for the best talent to fit the client's requirements.

A client hires them to do a task-- fill a particular job. The task has specific criteria. They may, but probably won't, input your resume to their system. You will need to have extraordinary skills to fit the search criteria that they tend to work on for clients; most firms have an orientation that focusing on certain lines of business or perhaps certain functions.

The question I have to ask back is, "Why should they?" Because you think your resume might be useful to them? How do you know? Oh! You want to get on the radar. Good. Do something great that fits their search criteria. Get written up. Get featured in an interview. Do things that turn your work into celebrity so that you are not just some person sitting at desk doing a job that you think is so valuable to other people. Get known!

This is the branding process that most people don't get. Search firms are acutely aware of how important the brand processes; it makes someone more salable to their client. It is not like they're trying to fill some staff level position. They are trying to fill positions for successful executives.

What makes someone appear to be successful? Answer. A vivid credential. I refer to it as a vivid credential because it is known, respected, been recognized, been written or interviewed about, has been on the stage talking about . These are criteria that allow them to recognize that other people have vetted you and identified you as being successful, smart and a leader.

Sending a resume to them? Useless! Let me restate that – – it's almost useless. You may get lucky. But the likelihood of you being lucky is so small that it is far better for you to put all that effort into developing a reputation so that you become visible and written about. You want to be published, you are on stage talking about your accomplishments, instead of simply being some guy who says a resume in.

Why do you want to be "some guy" or "some woman" who sins a resume in has some researcher look at it and ask themselves, "What we have this anyway? And then feel good about deleting it. Seriously. "Why do we have this resume?" If it's nothing that we are looking for.

Again, the nature of search has evolved so that data is more readily available. It's not like in the old days when I started often recruiting where you had to deal with microfiche and look at newspapers on microfilm and find the article that was written about you. There are so many places where you can get known! Focusing on that and not on, "whether they are even looking at your resume."

Who are you that you that they should even be looking at your resume?. That is what you should be focusing in on.-Who you are. That should make them want to focusing on you. -

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Another Job Search Lesson from “The Godfather” (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers another pearl of wisdom from “The Godfather” to teach you about loyalty to your employer.

Summary

This is a quote from the 1st movie where the oldest son, Santino, talks to Michael is about to enter the military.  I think this is the scene where he gives in a noogy.  This is the quote: 

"Your country aint your blood.  Remember that."  It is not in typical James Caan fashion.

The lesson here is going to pertain to job search.  It isn't about your country. It's about the company you work for.  

A lot of the way you've been trained to think about employers is propaganda from the employer's perspective.  The training you to be loyal.  It's about working hard for the organization and rising up through the ranks.

"Don't change jobs too often.  After all…" Lots of cautionary tales that basically tell you to keep your mouth shut and go to work.

The lesson here is really what do employers do on their side?  They do whatever is necessary to stay afloat.  Most firms will do that ethically; on occasion, there are some firms that will do it unethically and sometimes, illegally.  With regard to how they deal with employees, frankly, employees are disposable.  They use you as long as they can. If they don't need you, you are gone.  If economic circumstances change, your gone.

You need to conduct your career in much the same way, too.  You can't just sit there waiting patiently for some of the tapping on the shoulder and say, "I think you're ready for that promotion to program her grade level II."  (I just use that as an example of 1 of those stupid institutional titles that employers sometimes use)

Instead, think in terms of what is going to advance your career.  What is going to help you get ahead?  That can be internally or externally.  As I've said many times, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those are great qualities to have).  The people who get ahead are the ones who are alert to opportunity.  Sometimes those are internal to their current organization. But, more often than not, they are external to it.

When you're tapped on the shoulder for an internal opportunity, is normally as a result of the patient, slow ascent up through the ranks.  When you're tapped on the shoulder externally, it is because someone sees something in you that they want.  They believe they need.  They think you have it.  

That is a halo that allows you to leverage that situation much more aggressively.

Isn't that really what is about?

It isn't about rising through the ranks slowly because the think you're ever going to get to the point where the 65 years old and retiring from these firms? Of course not. They will get rid of you way before then, or make the conditions untenable for you way before that.

You need to think of your career as being a series of steps, up through the ranks. Sometimes, you will make mistakes. You want to be in a position where you are in charge of your life, not your employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Can I Avoid Becoming Obsolete? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/17/can-i-avoid-becoming-obsolete/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone who wants to know how to avoid becoming obsolete.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Perfection | The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast

Do you have this affliction as badly as I do? On this show, I make a commitment to change. What about you? What can you do?

Summary

My thought for today was around perfection.I know I suffer from the disease of wanting to be perfect and I suspect for many of you, you have that same affliction, too.

I know 1 of the places that it shows up for me is in 1 of my websites were I know it isn't perfect yet. It isn't even that great. It has mistakes in it that I need to fix. But I would rather focusing on helping other people and I haven't taken the time to make the corrections yet.

I know some of you may say that if I correct the website. I will help more people, I know that. Where do you folks do the same thing? Where do you make choices that are "complicated" that you can rebuke yourself for and criticize yourself for cannot really take the time to fix.

I'm just can simply send all make some changes in the NoBSCoachingAdvice.com website over the course of the next few weeks that will improve it. Right now, like I said, it is not perfect. It is getting better all the time.

I hope there's a place for you can focus in and start making some changes that will allow you to feel better about some aspect of your life.

Again, the goal is not to be perfect. That is impossible. But you can do better and you can be excellent.

To get around and see where you can take some steps, maybe it is in your help. Maybe using your family and with your relationships. Maybe it is and how you tell people that you care.

Wherever it is, just do a 1st step real soon.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” “No BS Job Search Advice,” and “Job Search Radio.”

Are you interested in my coaching you?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Subscribe to the “No BS Coaching Advice” podcast.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

What to Look for When Reviewing “At Risk” Employees


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http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

For many managers and business leaders, the first clue they think they are given is when they are asked if they have a minute on a Friday afternoon to given notice. That couldn’t be the furthest things from the truth.

Here’s the simplest thing to keep an eye out for.

Summary

This 1 came from an institutional customer of mine who asked for some advice about something. The advice is about recognizing the signals employees are sending about being "at risk." To me was an easy question before her was a bit different. I thought I would walk through stages of employment so that you could spot the evolution with your people.

Jimmy, there are a few stages beginning with the one where they joined and they are all sorts of gung ho and they are really into it and they are trying to prove that you made a great decision hiring them and that this is a great job. Then, they get into the rhythm of the office where they start to play to the level of everyone else. It is not an ideal set of circumstances. if you have average staff or mediocre because they start to adapt to them, rather than your existing staff adapt to the new hire.

It's like I heard said many times, environments tend to win. If you think about the language and offices, "Oh! He is a brown nose," what are they trying to communicate? He is trying to get on the boss's good side. As a result, he is not 1 of us. He is someone who is catering to the boss. Until that individual levels out on the same plane as everyone else, they are not seen favorably by their peers.

Then there is the phase where they have adjusted. That's because environments win and they have adapted to it. In doing so, there will be times where they are hitting your head against the wall because you are not communicating with them the same way as you used to. The result is that frustration starts to set in. That's what happens. That has been my experience and the experience of everyone I work with as a recruiter and now as a coach. Resignation starts to set in.

Then there is the phase where they just don't give a damn until they walk out the door.

If you see this is a few natural progressions, you need to look out for the "noticing the resignation" phase that they have leveled out to their existing staff, they have become 1 of them, and are not trying to rock the boat anymore. "Not rocking the boat" is the 1st signal.

Then they start bumping up against you in some way because they start parroting the staff about something, instead of thinking like you. Until they become so frustrated that they start to neglect stuff. Maybe they're going through the motions… minimally. However, at the end of the day, they are really putting on a good performance anymore. That's a real problem because the next step is that they start heading out the door.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. 

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