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Stop With the Superlatives!

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to stop using superlatives to describe yourself in your resume and/or LinkedIn profile.

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I want to talk with you today about a certain peeve I have about resumes. This extends to LinkedIn profiles as well, but, I was reminded of it when I was interviewing someone for Job Search Radio last week who laid it out so beautifully.

When you read a resume or LinkedIn profile and the person describes themselves with superlatives of any kind (it doesn’t matter if there is one or 15; they are people who describe themselves with 15), when you describe yourself as a “visionary leader” with “extraordinary capabilities to enhance leadership ideas,”… No one believes you!

You just show yourself to be a fool. If anything, minimize your terms; being a minimalist when describing yourself is far more effective than these terms that are thought of as being BS. Why use the fluff when they do nothing to enhance the impression you give in people’s minds about you and instead caused them to think worse of you?

One of you done that was so visionary anyway? Let’s get practical about this. You’re going to be interviewed and they’re going to ask you, “What have you done this so visionary?”

What’s your answer? Nothing. You have nothing that is visionary in your portfolio. It was all BS, they knew it and called you on it.

So, cut the crap and get down to the brass tacks. Tell people what you know and what you’ve done. What you’ve succeeded in and how much money you help your firm make or save. Get the metrics in there (remember, if you work for a public company, you need to be careful with sharing some of that information to avoid revealing something proprietary or confidential).

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Executives–Be Careful With Those Metrics!

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out how executives need to be careful when discussing metrics on the resume and in an interview.

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I picked up a great job search tip from Perry Newman (www.perrynewman.com) when I interviewed him for Job Search Radio recently.

Perry pointed at something that I’d forgotten and that I had not been emphasizing when speaking with people– if you’re a veteran professional, if you are an executive or at a C level for an organization, you have to be careful with the metrics that you reveal if you work for a public corporation.

If you provide real numbers, sometimes those metrics are way too revealing you are disclosing information that may not be public yet.

However, if you speak in terms of percentages instead of real numbers, they are not at risk of an employer looking at you and thinking, “Gee, that was confidential information I was just told.”

That information might give them a competitive advantage to your firm and reveal too much about your current employer and cause them to have an advantage in certain negotiations and in certain situations.

Again, for use in executive, you have a fiduciary responsibility to your current organization. You cannot cross that line. Firms will listen to you and wonder whether you will do that to them, too. You don’t ever want to be in those circumstances.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Keep Your Résumé Up-To-Date

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the importance of keeping your resume up to date even after you start a new job.

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Right now, you are aggressively looking for work but I want to plant a seed with you. You’re going to find a job; it may not happen as soon as you like but you are gonna find a job.

Normally, in human nature seems to suggest that you exhale deeply and relax and you stop being open to other things.

If the recession has taught you anything it is that you need to be prepared at all times because you never know when you’ll need to look for work again.

Even if you’re happy, you never know when you’ll find the right opportunity land in your lap with someone calling up and saying, “I’ve got this great opportunity; we talked for a few minutes.”

My encouragement for you is to maintain an up-to-date resume. Every three or four months, sit down with yourself, take about 30 to 40 minutes, and jot down some notes about what you’ve accomplished during the previous three months.

This serves a couple of purposes. First, if you remained with your organization for years, great! During that time, you will get reviewed. Sometimes people are reviewed by new hiring managers or new managers have just taken over a group and don’t really know what the person has done over the year.

Some people freak out under those circumstances and panic. They are ill prepared for the review meeting and this will allow you to be prepared. Again, it’s a habit. Set an alarm in your phone or in Outlook. Set it up in a way that every few months you sit down with yourself, write down what you’ve done and update your resume.

Next, if you get that proverbial knock on the door on the shoulder that says, “I’ve got a great opportunity,” you aren’t starting at that point trying to construct a resume you might be busy or anxious.

Again, someone’s knocking on your door or tap you on the shoulder; you don’t want to stand be writing the resume because love other things on your plate. Better to be ready at that point because you’ve been doing your homework assignment and have treated yourself like a business of one, looking out for your interests, just like your employer is looking out for their interests.

You always want to be ready for that tap on the shoulder so that you are not then taking a few days to write your resume and risk losing out on an opportunity.

The fact of the matter is, if you say you’re going to take a day or two to write that resume, the next person who is called may not be taking a day or two. They may be getting in the door ahead of you, creating a great impression and locking you out of an opportunity.

Do yourself a favor. When you lay on this job, set up an alarm in your phone, in Outlook, or whatever system you use to remind you that every 3 to 4 months you take the time to update your resume so that it is no big production when you need one.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Want to Convey More Information? Here’s How.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to give more texture and information in your resume without making it too long.

 

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I want to give you some no BS resume advice to help your resume stand out, particularly if you are veteran professional, a person with a lot of experience and want to talk about some of the things that you’ve accomplished in greater detail than what resume would normally afford you.

Convention (and I think it’s a smart one) is that resumes to go longer than two MAYBE 2 1/2 pages under special circumstances. I don’t believe in one page resumes you are a novice or looking for an entry-level position.

I want to help you get more texture into your resume if you are someone with more experience.

Let’s say your manager, a director, a VP or a C level professional, and you are submitting your resume for possession. You want to talk about what you’ve done but you also understand that you need to keep your resume to particular length what do you do?

Hyperlinks.

Since you are submitting your resume through an electronic medium anyway (it’s not like you sending a piece of paper anymore), what you can do, for example, to use an example from IT, his let’s say you work on a project and want to go into more detail in your resume will allow space for, underneath the project name that you work for, including hyperlink that can go to the video that you created for you too, a more detailed description of what it is that you stepped into we took over the project and the things that you accomplished,.

You can tell stories and video. You can tell stories and text.

Obviously, this needs to be well written and/or well acted. You may need to do these a couple of times and have people look at it before submitting it to organizations.

But why not use the power of the web? Why not use the power of mobile to connect the document with more detail about the work that you’ve done?

As I’ve said before, stories are extremely powerful. Think of how you describe this project or this task that you’ve been did in an interview. You would share a lot of texture about it. You would describe what it is that you stepped into, what you accomplished, the money you saved for your firm, the money you earned your firm, the technology utilized, the numbers of people who report to you… All the story for this project would be told.

It will be a lot of space to use an individual document but if you’re using video, if you’re using a podcast, you can use a service like freeconferencecalling.com or freeconferencecall.com to record an audio to share with the firm, to talk about what you stepped into. A printed version of this would work as well.

So, again, it has to be well-prepared and well-rehearsed, as well as well-executed for it to work.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Do You Want the Best Résumé You Can Write or . . .?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter poses a dilemma for job hunters . . . Do you want the best resume you can write or the best resume?

 

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Do you want to use the best resume you can write or do you want to have the best resume?

99.9% of the time there’s a big difference between what you can write and what a professional can write. You may be the best person at what you do and when a friend comes to for advice about it, you can recognize there an amateur by comparison to you. A professional resume writer is like that for you.

They can construct a great basic resume. The neck to be able to write a resume for every single job you want to apply for. They are, you can tweak the resume that they construct two-tailed for the job you’re going to apply for. They will give you a good basic resume to be affected far more often and be far better than what you can do.

It will take them a lot less time and you can tweak it a little bit once you get it back from them to make it perfect in your eyes.

When all is said and done, do you want to write the best resume that you can do or do you want to have the best resume?

If you want a few recommendations of resume services, email me at [email protected] I’ll send an email to you with a few recommendations of services that you can use.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. JOIN NOW BEFORE THE PRICE INCREASE ON SEPTEMBER 5TH

Connect with me on LinkedIn

The Way Résumé Lies Are Exposed

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells a story from his own experience about exposing a job hunter in a resume lie and why you should do the same thing.

 

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I want to talk with you today about a new way that employers are finding resume inconsistencies. No, I’m not talking about them going to the LinkedIn profile. I’m not talking about them looking at Facebook. This is a point-blank way that people are getting exposed. Let me tell you story from my own experience.

I received the resume from someone recently and, as is my practice, I went to my database, my applicant tracking system to see if I already have contact with them.. I found their resume in my system, I looked at it and the one that I received from the person. Right before I parsed it, I noticed that there was something a little different about the dates. A few months have been added on here and a few months of been taken off there for a few jobs.

Normally, I would delete this person’s resume but I decide to call the and give them a chance. After all, people sometimes make mistakes. They don’t keep the world resume and they work from memory.

As I was qualifying him, I asked him about. There was a brief denial that he changed dates. I confronted him one more time and asked him, “how do you think these other dates got into my system? Do you think were manually typing things or are we parsing information from your own resume? I can assure you, were not typing resumes”

There was silence for a few moments and then he fessed up.

Employers are not going to give you that chance. If they hire you and find those inconsistent dates, they are just going to fire you. If they look at your resume and then find it in their applicant tracking system with something different, they are just going to delete the new resume.

Just be aware that you can’t lie like you used to. I’m not talking about reference checks. Reference checks can be faked. But if your resume doesn’t match up with what was in their applicant tracking system they are just going to leave the new resume and never tell you why.

If your own efforts or the efforts of other recruiters are going to land the resume in an applicant tracking system and an employer or a recruiters office, the lie can be exposed some years in the future. Don’t change your resume to cover up gaps. They are just going to be found out.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Why You Should Put Contact Info on Your Resume

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of putting contact information on your resume.

 

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There’s been an annoying trend in resume writing that people of been doing. I want to see if I can help put an end to it. It’s the absence of an address, city, state and no ZIP Code. Just a name and sometimes it’s only a first name and first initial of the person’s last name and a phone number.

Just start by providing your location and your phone number, particularly if it’s a mobile number, may not correlate to where you are. As a result, you need to include the city and state and ZIP Code. Even if you don’t want to provide an address that I understand some people have a security issue about giving up her address, but city state and ZIP Code should be essential for every resume.

Why?

Because recruiters search for candidates, we usually start by looking for people in the geographic area around the client. Without providing ZIP Code, we have no way of finding you.

Well, I gave you my city!

ZIP Code is more specific and more effective for searching. After all, where was your area code would serve as a good substitute, now with portable phone numbers, you could be like me–someone with a 516 area code who lives nowhere near that location. How would someone know?

So please make sure to include city state and ZIP Code on all of your resumes.

As for not including your last name, I understand that you have a concern about bias by people who will reject you based upon having a last name that they might judged to be unpronounceable. I will simply say that whenever I receive a resume of someone who only includes an initial, I personally am annoyed because I don’t have an easy way to identify this person. After all, some of them don’t even include a phone number or email address to reach them.

And, if you are concerned about bias, for bigoted people you are signaling to them that they should reject you. If they are going to reject you based upon your name not your qualifications, they will do it whether you offer your name or not.

Frankly, only including the initial of last name is assumed to indicate that you are working in the United States on an H1B visa. It is in your name or national origin that is causing you to be rejected. It is your residency status, unfortunately.

Let me also add that applicant tracking systems are also unhappy with seeing simply a last initial. Often they spit out such applications and reject them.

Help recruiters help you. Make it easy. Always include city state and ZIP Code in your resumes and your full name on it, too.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Targeting Your Résumé

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of targeting your résumé when you submit it to an employer.

 

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I want to give you some advice about your resume. I’m not talking about the generic resume you put up on a job board for people to contact you about. Then resume should be as large and broad and inclusive as possible, particularly with regard to the last 10 years of your career or your most recent work experience.

Why?

Because it’s most likely would be hired based upon the last two positions (to be clear, I’m not talking about consulting assignments because those could be much shorter); think in terms of four or five years.

So in this resume in needs to be full, encompassing, particularly with regard to the last five years of your career.

With the resume that you are submitting to the employer directly, you can’t send that resume. Why? Because it carries a lot of extraneous things that this employer won’t care about.

Remember the 80-20 rule? 80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients?

What you want to do with your resume is focusing in on the elements of your experience that fit what this firm is looking for.

If you’re applying for a job based upon online listing, you have the roadmap right there! If you have referral to someone who’s hiring, and someone who is told you about this position, well, they know about the job you can ask them about it.

Then, tailor your resume to what’s important this firm and minimize (I didn’t say eliminate) the other stuff. Why? Because they don’t care. What they care about is what they are trying to find in the way of an employee.

Remember, when you meet with them didn’t want to talk about what you’ve done. They want to talk about what you’ve done that matters to them. They want to talk about your relevant experience for the problem they have that needs to be solved by hiring someone.

If you start by focusing your attention on that, I can assure you that you are going to get more interviews.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Posting Your Résumé on the Web

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of not just uploading a resume to job boards but suggests a free alternative that allows recruiters to find your resume for free.

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SUMMARY

A lot of people use job boards. They shouldn’t be the only tool in your quiver but their great tool.

Here’s another tool to use.

Instead of just putting your resume upon a job board, why don’t you set up a website purely for your reume? You can use a service like wix.com and creaEte a one-page website (wix allows more),keyword optimized, SEO optimized so people can find it through Google.

Wix is free to there’s no excuse for a financial standpoint not to do this. All were talking about is taking your existing resume and putting it up on the web for people to find it for free.

Now if you make changes to your resume and other places, you will also need to change it on wix.

You know about LinkedIn and making sure your profile is set up well so that it is also keyword and SEO optimized. You need to do the same with your resume on wix or any other site you put your resume on.

The only cause that you will have is if you want to get your own domain. Otherwise they will issue one like jeffaltman.wix.com (that is not my real address. If it is a website is up your accident). That address is fine but you wait may want something specific to you and your taste. It would cost $10/$14 to get a custom domain.

Since you are giving it out to anyone it doesn’t matter if you have your own domain or not.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Instead of “Responsible for”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers words you can use instead of “Responsible for” in your resume so that you don’t bore the reader.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

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Connect with me on LinkedIn

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