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The Three Jokes of Recruiting |No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses the three jokes of recruiting in order to teach an important lesson about job hunting.

honeypot2

 

spp-transcript]

I want to talk with you about the 3 jokes of the recruiting business.

The 1st joke is, “How can you tell a job applicant is lying to you?”  The answer is, “Their lips are moving.

What’s the 2nd joke?

How can you tell a client is lying to you?

Their lips are moving.”

The 3rd joke is, “How can you tell he recruiter was lying to you?”  You guessed it – – their lips are moving.

 

When you basically translate it, what is being said is that everyone is posturing for advantage and the best outcome.  Everyone is exaggerating to some degree.

For you as a job hunter. You have to remember that the company may be talking with you about this great opportunity for you to advance when in most cases, what they really want to do is is hire the 4th drone in the 3rd cubicle on the 5th floor of a particular building.  You are not particularly important to them.

You may be important to that particular manager, but that manager, when times get tough, may not be they are any longer than you are.

In terms of the recruiter, the recruiter is posturing to engender trust in you. That’s because if you are unsure you may trust their words and allow yourself to take a job.

Now, if we were talking about an investment advisor and they were saying, “Trust me. Give me $50,000. Yeah. That’s the ticket yeah, trust me with the money.” You would be very hesitant. With the recruiter, you need to take your time before giving away your trust.

Finally, I understand that you are trying to get the best of the deal possible and you are trying to position yourself well. Everyone is kind of like 8-year-olds who are visiting their friends’ parents. Invariably, the 8-year-old is on good behavior over there, right? Well, everyone is on good behavior as part of the search process.

Your goal is to get the best information that you can in order to make a good decision for yourself. It’s not to be a good boy. It’s not to be a good girl. It’s to get the best information possible so that you can make a great choice, so that your career advances and you can get to where you want.

 

[/spp-transcript]

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Turn It Up! | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter shares some of his observations about working with recruiters and applies it to job hunting.

Serious mature businessman on call in front of laptop at desk in a bright office

[spp-transcript]

In my career, I’ve trained a lot of very successful recruiters. I’ve also trained some people who have washed out.  I put my best effort to try to help these people. But, when push comes to shove, ultimately, the onus falls on them to follow through a lot of the coaching that I give. Often, the biggest failure is around effort.

Most people (including job hunters in this) say they want to do a hard days work and they want to put in. Best effort. They want to be successful BUT when you examine what they do, they are not working as hard as they think they are.  That is true of job hunters, too.

How People Find Jobs

For you as a job hunter, statistically, people are finding work in a number of ways.  Consistently, statistics show, the job boards fill between 3% and 4% of all positions.  Recruiters fill an additional 20% to 22%.  I’m going to combine the numbers because some recruiters use job boards to find candidates.  And I will add a little more than that.  So, let’s assume that 30% are filled by job boards and by recruiters.  

70%, though, is filled as a result of networking.  In a recent statistic that I heard, 70% that of those jobs (70% of the 70%) or filled as a result of a network connection to someone that they didn’t know at the beginning of the job search.

Here’s the point.  You are not working as hard as you can to find people to connect with and develop a relationship with in order to become 1 of those people in the 70%.  What you need to be doing is putting in a “Max effort.”  You need to try that much harder, to operate at a much higher capacity than you are now.  I’m not saying to work like a maniac.  You need to have some fun and there, too.  At the end of the day, you need to kick it up some notches. You need to put yourself out there with some people you are not really talking to yet.  You need to track these relationships so that, in this way, you remember your conversations, what your commitments are and follow-up… Stuff flows along those lines… When push comes to shove, you have to kick it up. Some notches.

Again, it’s not who applies to the most jobs on the job board.  You are swimming in the lake with a lot of hooks out when you’re swimming in job boards.  There is a lot of competition with other fish in their for that hook.  You want to be out there swimming in streams and rivers that have hooks out there, but not a lot of fish there. This way, you are able to swim up and be able to connect with the organization.  In addition, you need to be able to come in with a referral from someone you know.

[/spp-transcript]

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What You Must Do If a Recruiter Calls or Emails – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you must do if a recruiter calls you or emails you after you submit a resume.

 

[spp-transcript]

I want to talk with you today about an experience I’ve had recently that I think is absolutely ridiculous. You, as a job hunter, cannot do this.

You send a resume to a recruiter after seeing a job that they had online.  You receive an email or phone call from the recruiter and what don’t you do?

Respond to them.

It’s ridiculous!

I’m not saying you shall respond instantaneously, but, you saw a job! I’m staring at a bunch of messages that I left 2 days ago.  I haven’t gotten over for return phone call from these people.  If I sent them an email.  I haven’t received a response.

A phone call.  Very simple.  A conversation.  5 minutes.  Responding to an email to answer a few questions so I can discern whether you fit.  5 minutes.  Very easy to do.

No response?  Come on!

You are in job hunting mode and don’t respond to people when there’s a position available? Help me understand how this makes sense to you.

I’m not going to encourage you.  I’m going to demand, Once you send out a resume, you have a commitment to respond when someone leaves a message for you.  After all, they’ve invested effort in responding to you.  It is rude not to respond back.

You may say the reverse is also true.  Recruiters don’t call me back.  Well, if you sent out spam to them (a resume that in no way, shape or form was close to fitting the job that you are submitting it for) why do you expect the call back?  After all, all you are doing is wasting their time.

However, if you said that a resume for job that you appear to fit AND you have gotten a call from 1 of them, or an email seeking clarification of some points, you have a fish on the hook! Reel it in!

[/spp-transcript]

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

No! No! No! It’s the Recruiter Who Lied!

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqRG3OJRApE[/svp]
Too often, people fall for stuff that recruiters say to them and blame employers. In this video, I illustrate one of those classic examples of recruiter BS.

[spp-transcript]

People sometimes believe that they have relationships with recruiters. They have known them for a while. They trust them. The person seems honest. Let me point something out to you.

I was coaching someone recently who told me about a job he was submitted to buy a recruiter. He likes the guy and thinks he’s competent; the job hunter is not quick to give out praise to people.

The job hunter is looking for director role and goes on an interview for a position reporting to a manager. That tells you right away it is not a director role. He is interviewed by a staff person who reports to the manager; he queries a him about something that he knows little about and is wrong in his opinion, gets into an argument with the job hunter who, later, sent him a link to a Wikipedia article proving that he (the job hunter) was right.

“I was told this was a senior role by the recruiter. It’s reporting to a manager. Why did they change things?”

Let me let you in on a secret. They didn’t change anything; you were lied to by the recruiter.

If a firm changes a position from a director level to one reporting to a manager, this is not something they conveniently forget to tell the search firms about. Certainly, they will speak to the recruiter and tell them “You have this director coming in. We revise the position to one reporting to a manager (a senior architect, for example). Make sure the person will be okay with that.”

I’ve never seen a situation where firm didn’t tell me that when they revise the position so I can go back to the job hunter and not waste everyone’s time.

I had to stop in his tracks and tell him, “It’s not the firm. It’s the recruiter who lie to you!”

Recruiters take advantage of the relationship because they hoped that, if you go in the door, like the money, the job, or the company, maybe you will accept the job offer and they’ll earn a big fee. They believe that they have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

I have to challenge you about working with recruiters. There are a lot of very very good ones. After all I’ve done search from many many years and do more coaching now but still think of myself as a search professional. In the work that I’ve done I’ve always been forthright with job hunters I know a lot of people who are the same way.

Then there are the others. You don’t really know the difference when they tell you it’s a senior position. It’s a senior what? Senior manager? Senior director? Senior VP? What kind of senior are you talking about? In this case it became senior architect.

So get explicit with them because there is a seduction going on where search firms are individual recruiters play on the relationship to have you do things you really shouldn’t be doing because they are a colossal waste of your time.

[/spp-transcript]

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Should I Tell The Recruiter I Have Counteroffer?

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu794lYLuCU[/svp]
You’ve been looking for a job for a while, received and accepted an offer from a firm, given notice and received a counteroffer. Should you tell the recruiter?

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Should I tell a recruiter I have a counteroffer? I want to start off with a few questions.

In telling the recruiter you have a counteroffer, what are you trying to accomplish? If you want to stay where you are, if your current employer has resolved every single reason why you decided to leave (after all, it wasn’t only about earning more money; it wasn’t just about getting a better job; it may have involved coworkers. It may have involved promotional opportunities), stay. What are you hoping to gain by telling the recruiter?

If the counteroffer is one where your current employer says, “We’ll match the offer,” that takes care of the money part of the situation. What about the rest of it?

By the way, there are two different types of recruiters. Agency recruiters and corporate recruiters. Our bill with both a little bit later. Right now, I’m talking about you and your side of this.

So, again, if they match the money, so what? There still all these other things that are problematic. I talk to people all the time you stay when the money is matched and then call me a month later and asked if I can get the previous offer back.

NO! You burned a bridge. You said yes and now you said no. They have long memories.

What you do instead is ask yourself why you would want to state an organization that’s holding you back that will keep you at the same desk for a higher paycheck. If the that’s the reason you are leaving, you put a gun to their head, they will remember that when review time comes along or the next time that there’s a promotion and they have a choice between you and the person that was loyal. They will reward the loyal one, obviously.

Unfortunately, people are seduced by the money and start jumping for it, begging for more and forget that there were other factors important, too.

Why would you stay with an organization we had to put a gun to their head, force them to make promises that they may forget later on in order to keep you.They may change nothing once you turn down the other offer.

The second thing I want to speak to is the difference between corporate recruiter and agency recruiter in this scenario.

Agency recruiter may pull out this article called, “Counteroffers: The Road to Ruin.” This is an article written many years ago in a publication for recruiters. It tries to persuade job hunters that staying in a current job instead of joining the firm they promise to join will kill your career because employers have long memories and remember the disloyalty. After all, all they’ve done is give you your next raise a little early, nothing changes, etc.. They will beat you up relentlessly.

You have to calmly deflect that and tell them, “Go to the client. Tell them to up the money. I’ll do it for this. It has to be a little bit above. After all, how do I gain if it it’s the same money?”

With a corporate recruiter, will generally seem a little more care. Agency recruiters are afraid of losing their fee, the big payday for all the work that they’ve done. A corporate recruiter will ask, “Why do you want to stay? What is it about your old job that’s changed the makes it better than ours?”

“Well, they match the money.”

“What about all those other things that they haven’t improved upon??”

You may eventually get to, “Well, I need a little bit more,” but when push comes to shove they will either be able to do it or not be able to do it and you will have to make a decision.

I’ll end by saying if it is only the money, remember that you put a gun to their head to get it. If they change other conditions, then maybe it’s worth considering. Caveat emptor. Yes, tell other recruiters but have a reasonable expectation of what you can get from it. Just know that statistically, when I’ve seen people stay, problems arise later on.

When you go to a new place, you start fresh with a halo around you, in some respects it’s easier and in some respects it’s harder.  They view you as their Savior, a solution for them a solution for them, rather than someone aggravation on a Friday afternoon by giving notice.

[/spp-transcript]

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

What Are The Things Recruiters Search Online About Someone Before Recruiting Them (VIDEO)

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MN1WBNTa2ZA[/svp]
What do recruiters look for? It’s really very simple. Don’t over complicate it.

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What are the things recruiters search for online before they try to recruit someone? I think this is a good question and I want to start by saying a lot of people confuse what a recruiter is, a lot of people confuse will recruiter’s work is. Let me distinguish between categories.

Employment agent is someone who responds to resumes that are sent to them. A recruiter is someone who goes out and hunts for talent. They find people who may or may not be actively looking for a job. Let’s work with that definition of a recruiter.

What is a recruiter looking for when they are searching online for someone? What they have is a job description. A client has defined what it is they want to hire. They want someone with a particular background, right?

What does the recruiter do? Well, they start off by trying to find people who fit that particular requirement. They run a very tight search.

If the client starts off saying they need people with these 15 particular skills, they are running a search that specifies these 15 different items. This way, when they contact someone, they have a reasonable probability of success.

When they are looking at the LinkedIn profile, since that’s what I’m sure you’re referring to, they are looking for something that demonstrates congruence with what the client is looking for. Let me repeat that. They are looking for something in your LinkedIn profile that demonstrates congruence with what the client is looking for.

Plus if the information is very old, if the information and skills listed in your profile have not been updated since William Jefferson Clinton was president of the United States, it is less likely that the client or the recruiter is going to be impressed with the background. They want to see recent information.

They are looking for something that demonstrates subject matter expertise. What makes this person stand out from all the other people who they find online or through any other means (like referrals)? What makes this person right for our organization?

Before calling them, they want to feel like they have a reasonable probability that the client will be interested and excited in this person. That’s up to you as the job hunter rest person who is online displaying themselves to others… To provide that value if they are looking at your profile or find you through Google.

Don’t just sit there passively. Think to yourself, “this is what I do. This is what I am exceptional at. What makes me stand out?”

You can use powerpoints using slideshare and connect them to the LinkedIn profile. You can create videos. You can create regular with audios on Anchor.fm where you are talking about something for two minutes or less and then link it to your LinkedIn profile.

There are a lot of things that, if you start thinking creatively, you can promote yourself as an expert. With time w,ith regularity, you will be seen as someone better than the pack.

So, again, we are looking for congruence with what you claim to have expertise in.

[/spp-transcript]

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

In addition, they are looking for subject matter expertise – – what makes this person stand out from all the other people who they find online or through any other means (for example, referrals).

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn 

Should I Accept a LinkedIn Connection Request from a Recruiter?

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyNPfuCzqXs[/svp]
Recently a recruiter from a big software company showed interest in hiring me on LinkedIn. He also sent me a connection request. It means if I don’t connect he might not move forward, and if I do, he might just get my contacts and move away!

 

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I just got back from the gym so excuse me if I appear sweaty. I am sweaty!

I received a message for someone I think is a really good question: Should I accept a LinkedIn connection request from a recruiter? Recently, a recruiter for a big software for show interest in hiring me on LinkedIn. He also said the connection request. It means if I don’t connect, he might not move for and, if I do, you might just get my contacts and move away!

The fear that so many people have is incredible to me.

Start by saying that LinkedIn is selling the entire database to recruiters for about $400 per month, $450, something like that. Big software company? These guys have all that data are available to them. Don’t sweat that aspect of it.

The real question is if you are concerned about the impact of not accepting, then accept. However, if you are concerned that this recruiter is going to take your contacts from you, let me let you in on a secret. If you go your privacy settings on LinkedIn (you’ll find it in the upper right-hand corner of your homepage, behind that pretty little picture of you, click on it and one of the choices offered to you involves privacy for your account).
Click on the privacy option and you’ll see that you can block individual people and you are able to not share data with others. If you have any concerns about this individual, block them it’s really that simple. They will be able to see your updates; do not to be able to see your connection requests; they will be able to see any of the people in the network. You just going to block them. So this is a non-issue.

For you as a job hunter, I want to remind you of something. Your network is your net worth. Unlike days of all, where people were afraid of everything, we’ve all opened ourselves up. We’re trying to do more things to become known and noticed.

This recruiter may be trying to get a sense of you over time, maybe not for this job search but with the next one in mind. I will tell you that if he doesn’t hire you or she doesn’t hire you because you didn’t accept the connection request from them, they are idiots!

First of all, as a recruiter, they don’t hire anyone; hiring manager makes that decision. Maybe you don’t get in the door, but it’s unlikely. They have metrics on them about filling jobs. If you are the right talent, the hiring managers interested in hiring you, don’t sweat the decision not to connect with the recruiter.

The real important thing is that you need to connect with more recruiters, not less. More people need to know more about you. You can’t hide in the corner of the closet until such time as you’re looking for something else.

After all, the data is already out there about you. Let me show you. If you go to this little search tool, www.li-usa.info, do a search and what you’ll find is a Google search tool that searches every US LinkedIn profile that is available publicly.

You’re there. People can find you easily. I don’t know if it will let you see the connected with but, thanks for that is a possibility. As I’ve said, all the data is out there already. LinkedIn is selling it in droves. Don’t sweat this.

If anything, you should be going in the opposite direction by connecting with more people. I’ll tell you why.

A person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. The person who gets ahead is the one who remains open to opportunities. Sometimes, those are internal to organization. Most of the time, they are external to it.

If you’re hired by this big software firm, and a year from now, five years from now, 10 years from now, you decide to change jobs again. Do you want to be operating from that corner of the closet again or do you want more people to know about you? If you are smart, the latter is the right answer.

So, can it with this person and, if you have any concerns about them, block them using privacy settings.

[/spp-transcript]

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Don’t Steal

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why you should not steal from recruiters.

 

[spp-transcript]

You probably don’t think of it this way but let me clear it up. When you see an ad from a recruiter and refers to a job online and you say to yourself, “hey I know that firm is! I think I’ll contact them directly,” you are stealing. You’re taking information that you learned about and using it for your own purposes.

I also want you to understand it’s not the smartest move in the world. Why? The recruiter has a relationship with this firm. They know more than you about the organization. They can handle your schedule. They can help you tailor your resume based upon the job involved and the relationship with the firm and what they may know about the job apart from what has been advertised.

Why would you go around them? To save the firm money?

It costs you so much more because 95 times out of 100 people to get the job that they apply to directly without the coaching of a recruiter.

Foolishly, you think you’re doing the company a favor. In fact, you’re hurting yourself and you are stealing. You are stealing that information to use it for your own purposes without any consideration for the impact on the other person.

Be considerate.

Be kind.

I talked to a friend of mine who is a recruiter with another firm who told me about two instances where people saw one of her postings and went directly to a client and the client dismissed these people and told her the story about them because it was real clear that these people had come to them based upon seeing the advertisement.

Let me summarize by saying, “don’t do it.” What do you get out of it? Do you feel good about it? Do you feel good that you were tricky and are better than the recruiter?

Or you’re going to get back a recruiter that you don’t even know for all the things that happened to you at the hands of recruiters?

Stop it. Seriously, be considerate to everyone that you meet professionally because you don’t know when it will come back and either help you or hurt you.

Help you because you are considered to the other person or hurt you because you acted obnoxiously.

[/spp-transcript]

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You’re Kidding Yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a common misconception people have when they think about recruiters.

 

[spp-transcript]

Recruiters. Very charged topic. When I look around at people and their opinion of recruiters, they are universally criticized, complained about and thought poorly of.

Part of it stems from the fact that you have a misconception about who the recruiter works for. Most people think that recruiters work for them; it doesn’t work that way.

If the will, how much you paying for that service? And you think you’re working for you?

The fact of the matter is that recruiters are hired by organizations to fill jobs. If you fit the requirement do you think you’re going to get on the phone and call companies and say, “hi! I’ve got this great candidate! You’ve really got to talk with them! They are terrific! Best person I’ve ever spoken with! Sorry, you don’t need someone like that?”

And may call after call on your behalf trying to market you the companies.

It doesn’t work that way. Recruiters work with organization that defined a need for a person with a certain kind of background and go out and find. They are paid for that service. To do that they need to find someone like you.

I say like you because it may not be you. It may involve someone with a different set of skills. Even if you have the same skills as the firm is looking for, do you think they’re only sending in one person? Of course not!

They are going to send it is many is the client will let them submit in order to ensure that they collect the fee. By sending in a lot of people the recruiter is hoping to encourage them to make a choice of one of the candidates.

Why do they do this? Because they want to earn a fee.

They are not relying upon placing you and you don’t fit. What they care about is referring someone… Anyone… Will satisfy the client and being hired by, then work 90 calendar days and receive a check from the company.

Recruiters need to look out for themselves because you are not going to pay them anything! This is not social work; this is recruiting. Unless they refer someone who is hired, a contingency third-party recruiter will not be paid.

Why do you think they are any different than you in looking out for their own interests? Respectfully, when you think the recruiter is working for you you are deluding yourself.

Yes, to earn their fee, they have to find someone who fits the role the client to specified and will work there successfully for 90 calendar days.

Why do you think this person is any different than you in looking out for their interest?

At the end of the day if it is not you, they are hoping that it is someone else that they are representing. That way, they will make a substantial chunk of money.

So don’t kid yourself and think that recruiters are working for you. As many of you know they aren’t and that’s a fact

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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