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The Preferred Application Process


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from Quora about the preferred application process

Summary

There was a question on Quora today., "When applying to jobs, do you prefer filling out forms, one click solutions like on LinkedIn where you can apply using your LinkedIn profile, or a simple career specific email address?"

Let me start by saying that the question has a flaw to it. The flaw is whether you prefer the ease of doing something and you're looking at the question from the job hunter perspective. From the job hunter perspective, everyone wants the one click solution because it involves no effort. But there was a flaw.

The flaw is what gets results? Frankly, one click solutions where they are just sending off your LinkedIn profile, fail more often than not. Because the profile is not tailored to demonstrate what you can do for the organization. It is a generic thing... The same resume sent to job after job. The result is that you are focused on ease of submission; I'm thinking of demonstrating the fit. Employers are thinking of you demonstrating the fit, too.

If your profile happens to do it, great! Unfortunately, most don't. Don't take the lazy way out of here. Submit a resume (or actually contact the hiring manager, finding them using LinkedIn, see if you have a friend who can introduce you) and going in that root, rather than just simply sitting back and saying to yourself, "I would rather just sit back and let someone or something else to all the work... That they don't do.

At the end of the day, the even recruiters want to see something that vaguely looks like what they are trying to find for their clients. Again, don't get lazy about this because you will reap the consequences of that laziness.

Now, you might have the most wonderful skills on the planet but, eventually, it is going to shift and they are not good be quite so dominant. Trust me. There were a lot of Java developers out there who one day ago were heroes and now are ordinary as their skills became commoditized. That is going to happen to you, too,oh, Ruby professional, oh php developer, oh startup maven.. You may be ruling the roost now and hopefully will never need a job again. Your firm may wind up cashing out and you will become a gazillionaire.

However, the question is, what do you prefer? The answer should be, "I prefer a submission that is going to get the best result. One click apply does not do it..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Getting on the Radar | Job Search Radio


Whether you are actively or passively looking for work, you need to do things to get on the radar of the differnt people who will be trying to hire talent. Jeff and David Perry, the head headhunter for Perry-Martel International and author or co-author of 5 books including, “Guerilla Marketing for Job Hunters” discuss the mistakes people make with their LinkedIn profiles, how to make them stronger and an example of someone who David helped find a divisional President’s position for with a firm many times larger than his current one at a compensation at least 3 times larger than what he was currently earning that all started with powering up his LinkedIn profile.

Summary

Hi, this is Jeff Altman and welcome to webtalkradio.net. When I think of Linkedin, I don’t just think of a social network for business. I tend to think of the most important vehicle that professionals/ nonprofessional labor has in order to find work. You see to me, the person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest. They don’t always work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. I tend to think of the person who gets ahead as the one who remains alert to opportunity. Sometimes that’s internal to work in an organization, but more often it’s external. Today we’re going to talk to David Perry who’s the headhunter for Perry-Martel International.

He’s negotiated more than 200 million in salaries and completed more than a thousand recruiting projects on three continents. He has a bachelor’s from McGill and is the author or co-author of five books, including his most recent, gorilla hunting for job hunters 3.0. David, Welcome to Job Search Radio.

Good morning, Jeff. Thanks very much for having me. Pleased to be here.

You’re very welcome and I’m thrilled to have you on the show. You know, like I was saying. People need to be alert to opportunities and that translates to me as not just simply when they might need to find a job but just being open to other opportunities while they might still be happy in an organization. That requires being found, and Linkedin is probably the most important place to be found by recruiters, both corporate and third party. Yet people make a lot of mistakes working with Linkedin. I’m sure you see that all the time.

Every day.

What sort of things do you see that people do wrong with their Linkedin profiles and how they use Linkedin?

Oh, that’s a great question. Let me preface it by saying, no one should ever go into a job search before they do one thing. And the one thing they need to do is start with absolute clarity. When it comes to Linkedin, what I mean by that is, it is limitless what you can put into Linkedin. Really, the mere fact that you can change a tire on a car - does anybody really care? Maybe they do if you’re looking for a mechanic’s job.

So here’s the point. You’ve got all this information about yourself. If you start with clarity about the type of job you want to do or the type of organization you want to work for then you fill your profile with information that relates to that. So it makes you easy to be found by a recruiter using the keyword search for the types of opportunities that you’d be interested in.

You and I both know, all jobs are temporary now. Everyone’s gonna change every 18 to 24 months. It might be inside a company, but more than likely it’s going outside a company. So because all jobs are temporary, you need a billboard on the information highway and Linkedin is that.
So with that said, when you think about the mistakes people make, I’m gonna translate as being not getting clear about what you might be open to or what you might be looking for in your next organization and thus not making your profile keyword rich enough around those particular attributes that you want to draw people to. Would that be a correct summary?

Absolutely. Absolutely. I wish I’d said it that well myself.

And you provided a lot of texture. What other mistakes might people make when they construct their profiles?

Well even people that start with clarity and understand what they want to be found for, the first place people normally go wrong - and it’s so funny that people do this wrong - is a bad picture. And what I mean by a bad picture is, it’s a picture of you in a group of people. No one’s going to be able to pick you up because they don’t know who you are. Or it’s a picture of you standing somewhere so that on the screen, you’re about a quarter inch tall.

When you do a picture, you want it to be a professional photo. You want to have a nice smile on, you want to be engaging. People like people that smile. People like people that look engaging and interesting, not like a slob on a bad hair day. The reason this is important is that even though it’s technology, the person that’s looking at your Linkedin profile is the most important thing first: they’ve got to like you. And that’s a gut-level decision they make, like it or not, based on your appearance. So get a great photo, have a well-lit - you know, potentially have a photographer take it. But make sure it’s a well-lit photo, you’re smiling, you’re dressed professionally or you’re dressed in a manner that people can see you in that role.

If you’re a mechanic, you’re dressed like a mechanic. If you’re a CEO, wear the appropriate attire. That’s where most people go wrong, right out the gate. You want number two?

I just want to add onto that one and simply say that the tuxedo shop for guys and the ballroom dress for women isn’t the direction I would go.

You know what? I forget that, and you’re absolutely correct. That’s not natural. That’s not you at work. You’re so absolutely right because I’ve seen a couple of those lately and it did make me laugh.

So what’s number two? What’s the second mistake that you tend to pick up on?
Number two is, you’re boring. And what I mean by boring is you’re dull. Right out of the gate. For example, you and I do a lot of project-manager sales guys. So as a recruiter when I do a keyword search in Linkedin, I get a whole list of people that match that keyword profile and what I’ll see is name and next to that will be their tagline which is their tagline, which is the piece of text that is right next to your photo. And the thing
That’s that big definition of real estate underneath your name that kind of describes who you are, right?

Absolutely. So what will a project manager put? He’ll put ‘project manager’. That’s very good, except so did every other project manager. So how do you differentiate yourself?

I’m looking for a project manager in New York and I do a search, I’m going to get like four or five thousand results and for a recruiter, how can he tell if you’re any better than anybody else because it’s just a list that says name, project manager; name, project manager all the way down the list.

Well if you take your tagline, which is that part just after your name as you said, and you put something compelling like a question: you know, ‘ask me how I saved my employer $100,000’ or ‘ask me how I finished a project in one third of the time’. Those kinds of questions are compelling because they actually look at the results that someone would be looking for someone to produce if they were a project manager. And if you put that into your title or your tagline, all of a sudden of all the other project managers, yours says ‘ask me how I did boom.’ And you stick out like a sore thumb or in this case, you stick out like a four-leaf clover.

That kind of reminds me of an interview that I did for a previous show with a gentleman named Hal Klegman who told me that the biggest mistake people make with their resumés is that they say a lot about job descriptions instead of accomplishments, and defining accomplishments by metrics like ‘earned such and such,’ ‘saved such and such’, ‘increased or decreased’ as a way of defining the success that you had in the organization, not just simply talking about role and responsibilities.

Correct. And every recruiter knows what a project manager does. You don’t have to tell us what you responsibilities and duties were. Because that’s just saying ‘hey, you’re an idiot. You don’t know what I do.’ Tell us what you accomplished. It’s like your resumé. You know, you go for an interview as a project and nobody has ever asked you, ‘So, what were your duties and responsibilities as a project manager’. It doesn’t happen.

They’re interested in what you did for that employer to push the cause forward. We both know, employers are all interested in only three things: can you make me money, can you save me money, can you increase my efficiency. That’s it. Until they actually get to know you and meet you, they don’t care about anything else. So you have to deliver the WIIFM: what’s in it for me. For employers, it’s ‘what’s in it for you’. So tell them what’s in it for them in the summary of your Linkedin profile by using the accomplishments that you know they’re going to be interested in because they’re relevant to the job you’re looking for .

That’s great, David. I want to cover one or two more mistakes that people make with their profiles if you have that, and then talk about a profile that we discussed last week where you helped this CEO really beef up his search and get great results. Let me just pause and come back to mistakes. What else do you see that people don’t do correctly?

Well, they don’t take advantage of all of the different types of file formats that you can use inside Linkedin. For example, when we were kids and I’m 53 so I’ve been doing it since kindergarden, right? The most interesting part of my day for me and everybody else in the class was show and tell. Right? So show and tell. You can use rich media. It’s called rich media. You can add photos and videos and weblinks in your Linkedin profile. And very few people do that. It’s a bland, boring job description of what they’re responsible for.

Throw that out. Use accomplishments and add some photos, if you’ve got them, that are relevant. Photos of a project that you did photos of a product you worked on, whatever.

Videos: same sort of thing. If you’re a writer, you can add a white paper. All of these things add depth and texture to who you are as an individual. All Linkedin really is is a first interview. And recruiters will go and look at a Linkedin profile well before they’ll call them in for a first interview. So if you consider Linkedin your first interview, what is it that you would like an interviewer to know about you that would make them want to meet you and find out more.

So if you look at Linkedin as the movie trailer for your life and career, one of the most interesting themes from your career that you could put into your movie trailer, if you looked at your Linkedin profile that way: think about that. What would be most interesting for your employer and go and get that kind of material and weave it into your profile.

When I think of that, David, I think of the summary area as a beautiful spot on the Linkedin profile to really demonstrate that. I know recently, I made some changes to my profile in order to bring in more video there, to be clear about the kind of searches I’ve done, where they’ve been geographically, to give people a way to contact me and a few more things that really distinguish me from the typical search professional that they might find me on Linkedin and it’s right there. It’s the first field but I know few people really take advantage of all that Linkedin provides them with in order to really promote themselves effectively for a reader.

Correct. I actually noted that and now I’m going to go compare my profile to your profile and pick up some pointers. There’s a great example. Why do people insist on inventing things from scratch? And what I mean by that is a lot of people get stuck on their Linkedin profile because they just don’t know what to say. They don’t know what’s interesting. Instead of getting stuck, why don’t they take the title of the position they’re looking for, put it into Linkedin search box, and see who comes up first. Ooo! Why do they come first? Because they have designed their profile to come up first. Just like a google search. You know, 50 pizza outlets well one of them’s going to come up first because they’ve done their search engine optimization correctly. And that sounds like it’s hard but it’s not. So when people get stuck, what they really need to do is go and take a look at other people’s profiles and see how they’ve constructed them and construct them in a similar manner.

One of the things that people can realize in addition to that is that there are signals that you get along the way, if you pay attention to them, that your profile just isn’t working for you. That is the notice that Linkedin sends to you about the numbers of people and who has looked at your profile. If you’re getting one or two hits a week or a month, there’s something wrong with your profile and you got to fix it.

And to add to that, Jeff, if you’re getting people looking at your profile that have nothing to do with the industry that you’re trying to target, then you’ve done something wrong and you’ve got to step back and analyze that. The easiest way to do that is to throw the title of job you’re looking for in and see what the other person’s doing.
And I’m going to pile on and say if you’ve got lots of people looking at your profile and no one contacting you, there’s a message in that too.

You know what? I should have thought of that. You’re absolutely right again. That’s a bigger problem because you’re saying something that’s turning people off or you’re not saying something that’s making them want to follow through or you’re making their life impossible, and what I mean is somebody sets up their Linkedin profile and they make it impossible for you to contact them. You either have to be a first Linkedin contact or you have to go through the whole rigmarole to contact them this way or this way. If you’re looking for a job, you want someone to find you’ great. That’s a great first step.

Next, you’ve got to get them to contact you. So I always tell people put your name, your phone number, and it can be a phone that you just rent for job search if you want to. You put your name, phone number, and email address that you want to be connected at the top end of your profile, in your summary so it makes it easy. Not that recruiters are lazy, but when you do a search for project managers in New York you’re going to get, I don’t know, 750,000, and you want to be the one that will get called. And you know that most recruiters go through and take the easy road, and by the easy road I mean, ‘oh, you look qualified and you have a phone number. I’m going to call them first. You gotta get the call.

You mentioned having the job search phone number. One of the tools I love is google voice. Voice.google.com I believe is the address or google.com/voice, and google will provide you with a phone nubmer that you can direct to connect with any other phone number that you have. So if you don’t want to be contacted after the search is over, which personally I think is a mistake but that’s a different conversation, you still have one phone number instead of having them contact you at you home, contact you at the office, call you on the mobile while you’re commuting. One number that will track you to wherever you are that will also forward a text to you if you like, that will translate any voicemail message that’s left for you. It’s a great little tool. Free, by the way.

Yeah, isn’t it great?

I love it. I happen to use it myself. When we spoke previously, you told me about this corporate or divisional CEO, as I recall, who just wasn’t getting responses with his Linkedin profile and you mentioned that you had really helped this person improve their game on Linkedin pretty dramatically and increase his number of connections by several thousand over a short period of time. Could you talk about some of the techniques that you used to really increase their capabilities around Linkedin?

Absolutely, and it was pretty simple. It was a guy that I met that I got to know fairly well. He became a friend. And he decided for whatever reason he wanted to be more engaged with Linkedin because he wanted to look at other things. So he sat down one night over the dinner table at my house and looked at his profile which frankly sucked.

He was a vice president of construction for somebody, so his tagline was ‘vice president of construction.’ I said, how many vice presidents of construction do you think there are in your town and I said you know, you don’t stand out. So what we did was we recrafted his tagline. That was the first thing we did. And we recrafted his tagline from ‘vice president of construction’ to ‘vice president, commercial development. Ask me how I turned a swamp into a billion dollars’.

What a great attention-getter.

Oh, yeah. He had twelve connections. So I should him how to try and connect with people but we started with the title, ‘ask me how I turned a swamp into a billion dollars’ and then we went down and we wrote a profile. And let me read you the opening paragraph. ‘To remain a bullet-proof market leader in an intense, competitive, and highly volatile global market, companies need optimized transformation at their root level across all areas of the company. It’s a zero game. Be bullet-proof or be eliminated.’

Some people will look at that and they’ll go, ‘what are you talking about.’ And you know, that’s good because they don’t need to talk to him. He doesn’t need to talk to them. And the people who read that and go ‘wow’, and a lot of people did, are senior executives in the real estate industry all over the world.

Within a week he was up to 500 connections. And these are connections where he took a very narrow focus. He read every single connect to request with him and he only accepted it if they were senior executives or a head hunter in his particular space. He was at 3,000 by the end of the month. He had a very high quality, very targeted Linkedin face. And he took it from there. He didn’t talk about what his duties were, he talked about what he’d done. And he’d done things all over the world.

He ended up with interesting offers from India, Spain, many of them here in the United States. One in Mexico, one in Brazil. All for senior executives either in construction or in real estate and he’s accepted a job a couple weeks ago, and he’s accepted the president of the western division of a 25 billion dollar real estate conglomerate. And the most interesting thing: he’s currently VP construction of a - call it 50 million dollar company. But he’s built companies from the ground up, the one that’s largest is 250 million. And now, he’s going to be this president of a western division of a 25 billion dollar real estate company.

Here’s a wonderful lesson for our listeners, I think, to ensure a lot of intent to deal with the little picture in their Linkedin profile: the details of role responsibilities, accomplishments, if they’re an IT it might include the technologies that they’ve used and that’s all fine, well and good. But your person dealt at a bigger level. I’m sure they included some of that stuff in their profile to ensure that they keywords came up for them when people were searching and thus, the kind of message that they communicated really stood out by comparison to others. You also have to include the big picture of what your accomplishments were in order to really stand out from all the others that you’re competing with.

Correct. Couldn’t have said it better myself. And he didn’t do keyword stuffing, which nobody wants to do, but he made sure that the types of things that CEOs or recruiters that were looking for at his level would be seen in his profile. Like he used ROI, an abbreviation, or ‘return on investment’. Very few people, even executives, ever talk about return on investment. This guy did. He talks about C-level management suite. A recruiter is going to type in ‘C-level executive’. So all of the keywords that a recruiter or an executive search professional or a CEO or the owners of a real estate or a construction company would likely use, and we had to give this some real thought - we need a list of all this - were naturally woven into the profile.

Now here’s what’s interesting. A lot of people will go to the trouble of putting together all of the keywords they think someone’s going to search on, and then they’ll just make a bulleted list and put it in their summary. And that’s clever. But really, it doesn’t tell anyone anything about you or your abilities, other than that you’re pretty clever or somebody did this keyword stuffing for you. To actually take the keywords that you want to be found for and craft sentences and entire paragraphs around that to give it some depth is well worth it, but difficult.

When I was talking to him last week, his base salary, just the base, which is well into six figures, has been tripled. And his upside has gone from low six figures to low seven figures. So it might have gone up from $175,000 to a base of $450,000 now and an upside of just slightly over a million within the first 18 to 24 months. That’s a substantial change.

This doesn’t just happen at the executive level. This happens at every single level. I’ve done this with my daughters who are on Linkedin. They’re 21, 20, and 18. Instead of getting your regular ten dollar an hour job while they’re off in university, they’re getting $15 - $20 dollars an hour because they are able to articulate their value correctly to their employer to had a solution that these guys could solve.

At the end of the day, you and I both know, nobody gets up on Monday morning and says, ‘oh, I’m going to hire someone today because I have extra money.’ No, they get up on Monday and say, ‘Ugh, it’s Monday and I’ve still got this problem and this problem and this problem. They’re looking for people to be solution providers. And if you come across that way and build it into your Linkedin profile that way, you’ll get phone calls. And by the way, he made it very easy to connect with him.

Beautiful story. And for our listeners, I just want to remind all of you that these are strategies that work whether you are aggressively looking for a job today or are passively open to something in the future which you really need to do. As David said so well, jobs unfortunately in the modern era are temporary, whether they call them permanent or not. These are the least permanent things I’ve ever seen. So you need to put yourself into the position to be found in order to have opportunities present themselves to you. It doesn’t mean you need to respond favorably to everything. But the easiest way to find a job is when you’re not looking for one. Opportunity just gets presented to you that you can go Eenie,Meenie, Miney, Mo. Hey, that one looks pretty good. Let’s go into that one. I know there’s one mistake that job hunters make all the time.

What do you think is one of the biggest mistakes that people make on Linkedin profiles?

The biggest one that I find people make with Linkedin on general is, they never log back on. They get a profile, they put up something.

You’re absolutely right.

I see it all the time. They change jobs and never update their email address. They never provide people a way to reach them once they’re on Linkedin. And it’s bizarre to me.

Some people never send Christmas cards until they’ve lost their jobs and they realize they need to network. As Harvey MacKay said, ‘you need to dig your well before you’re thirsty’. It has to be part of your life. And Linkedin has to be part of your life, even if you only log in once a week or once every two weeks just to make sure things are refreshed and you remember to put your email address and your phone number in your summary. It’s a whole lot easier for recruiters to get a hold of you.

And with recruiters, you have two choices. You can say yes, or you can say no. How much easier can it get? I gotta tell you. It’s a lot easier than trying to get people on the other end of the phone pick up than when you’re looking. So it’s a great show today because you’re adding tremendous value to people’s lives and I hope they take it all very seriously.
And David, thank you so much for making time to be here and talk to our guests. I know you mentioned to me that you have an audio that you’d like to offer to everyone. How can they get a copy of that audio, and what is that audio of?

The audio is a 45-minute presentation with another fellow author being interviewed by another fellow offer on branding and social media. And we go step by step on a whole bunch of points, including the Starbucks coffee cup caper and gorilla resumé and listeners can get that by going to the guerilla marketing for job hunters website, which is simply gm4jh.com. It’s free. No strings attached.

That’s terrific. Thank you for making that available to everyone.

My pleasure.

Folks, we’re going to be back next time with more job search advice. I’m Jeff Altman, the big game hunter. If you’re interested in job search coaching from me, you can reach out to me in a variety of ways. One is, I’m a Live Person job search and career coach expert with liveperson.com. You can reach me that way if you have a couple of questions. If you’d like more broad coaching from me through the course of a job search, you can find out more about my coaching program at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Again, I work one on one in a personal with you in an effort to help you get back to work more quickly because to me, job hunting doesn’t have to be so hard or difficult or painful or take so long. It’s just for most people, you don’t realize that the skills needed to find a job are different from the skills needed to do a job. And that’s where a podcast or my ezine, which by the way you can get a complimentary subscription to my ezine, which is called ‘no bs job search advice’. I publish it weekly with advice for job hunters anywhere in the world. It’s a $499 value that I give away for free and by the way, you can get a complimentary subscription to my website, which is jeffaltman.com. And while there, go exploring. There’s a lot of great content there. So this is Jeff Altman. Hope you found today’s show helpful. I’ll be back next time with more great advice for you. Take care.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

Getting Known on LinkedIn | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/10/getting-known-on-linkedin/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to become known on LinkedIn as a subject matter expert and explains how to do it.
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”
JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.
Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook
You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”
Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

The Most Underutilized Feature on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

 

Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter offers advice about using the most underutilized feature of LinkedIn as part of your job search.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 1 of the most underutilized features on LinkedIn – – applications. But we're talking about applications. Were not talking about applying for jobs. We are talking about programs that are built into LinkedIn to provide additional services that are available for you to use for free. They may allow you to do something very simple-- put a resume on your LinkedIn profile. Put work samples or presentations that you've done. Useful information that people can pick up on on your LinkedIn profile.

Have you written a book? You can make reference to it on your LinkedIn profile. Applications are more than just things like this. It is a way that LinkedIn tries to be more social than their base product tends to be.

For your convenience, why don't have that presentation that you did 2 years ago, those powerpoints as part of your presentation, available on your LinkedIn profile to slideshare. Why not make it easier for people to find your resume by having it on your profile? They can actually see how you eat your backroom fits the job that they are recruiting for.

That's my reminder for today. Come over and look at LinkedIn profiles and spend some time playing around with the applications and see how they fit you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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What LinkedIn Summary Should I Have to Attract Recruiters (VIDEO)


Recruiters are constantly scouring LinkedIn for candidates. What LinkedIn summary should you have to attract recruiters?

Summary

"What LinkedIn summary should I have to attract recruiters?" As is the case of most of these questions, the sender hasn't put themselves in the position of being a recruiter. I don't do that kind of work anymore but I did for more than 40; I have a good perspective on it.

The 1st part of the question is, "how to attract recruiters." From there, once you understand the recruiters are finding people on LinkedIn, it becomes clearer.

When someone is looking on LinkedIn to find someone to fill a job with the client, they do keywords in order to do a search. Thus, whether is your profile or specifically the summary area of your profile, it needs to be keyword rich in order to demonstrate a fit.

Now, I would think more in terms of your profile and then, from there, use the summary is a summary of what you will attributes are.

When I think of who might be writing this question, I think they might be a less experienced person. Thus, what you want to be doing is writing about what your background really is. That's because when you write your profile you want to write one That is all inclusive… A laundry list of stuff. You want to make your summary as concise as possible (I'm not talking about brevity, per se), but you want to create incident someone looking at your profile clearly understands what your strengths are. After all, you don't want to do pointless interviews, do you? Zero it in and let the rest of the profile be keyword rich in order to draw people to the page.

From there, what I always tell people to do, is put a phone number and email address in your summary. Why? Because LinkedIn charges about $11 per inMail to message you and you are not on LinkedIn all the time To respond to inMails and messages that you receive. The fastest way for recruiter to contact you is not by spending $11 or $12 waiting for you to go online, But, instead, calling you or emailing you.Putting this information in your summary makes it easier for them to contact you… That expedites it for them by making it easier for you them to contact you…That is what you said you wanted when you wrote, right? It isn't enough to just get the view page. You want to get them to contact you.

In addition, if you have a premium account of some sort,Just checking to see who looked at your profile and who hasn't contacted you. From there, what you do is reach out to them, Message them and simply say, "LinkedIn told me that you would look at my profile. Let's connect. Is there anything I can be doing to help you? Is there something you are looking for in my background that you didn't see which I can address in the conversation?" What this does is flush them out so that you have an opportunity to connect with them.

Again, use the profile for a lot of keywords and the summary area to summarize what a lot of your attributes are. If you are a more senior individual. This becomes even more important.

So, zero in In the summary, give them an easy way to contact with you And you will get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

LinkedIn Profile Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2012)

NOTE: IF I REFER TO ANY OPEN POSITIONS, THEY WERE FILLED YEARS AGO. I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. I DO JOB SEARCH COACHING.

You know your LinkedIn profile is important, yet people make lots of mistakes that I speak about today.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Second Most Important Place on Your LinkedIn Profile | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the second most important place for you to write about in your Linked in profile.

Summary

I'm going to speak about the second most important area on your LinkedIn profile. Just to get it out of the way, the most important area is the line underneath your name. Between your name and outline, you are guiding people to what it is that you do. It needs to be quick and punchy to draw attention for people so that they are interested in going further.

The second most important area, the one that gets sorely neglected is your summary. Too often, I see summaries that are four or five lines long. Why can't you say more about yourself and create a section that is keyword rich that talks about your role and responsibilities and achievements in a generic sense, and then going to more specifics in the rest of your profile.

You can say, for So and So, I did such and such, reducing costs by X number of dollars or increasing sales by Y number of dollars.

Don't sell it short. Don't neglect it because it is the first place that a person's eyes go to after they've seen your name and the line underneath your name.

Sequencing it, it is your name, the line underneath your name, your summary, who you work for now, and then people's eyes bounce up to the summary again if it is good.

If it isn't good, it's a waste of time. People will go right to what you are doing now. You've missed an opportunity to persuade them.

A summary gives you a selling opportunity that you should neglect. If you use it well, you have an opportunity to really shine to a reader.

If you like, I have a few punchy comments in mind including my number in LinkedIn (I'm number 7653), as well as how I score on Myers-Briggs, DISC and Core MAP.

I talk about how I filled more than 1000 positions.

It's stuff like that that gets a reader's attention.

After all, is a certain amount that's pretty standard if you do recruiting. How radically different is that? Enhancements around that are what really make me stand out. Then when people go further and they see the YouTube videos I've done, the books I've written the podcasts I host and all the other things I do, I really shine.

Look for opportunities for yourself to stand out from the pack by using the second most important section of your LinkedIn profile and the one that is probably most neglected.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Personal Branding and Job Search (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the basic rules of job hunting and how branding contributes to that.

Summary

Yesterday, I received an email from someone who asked the wonderful question. "Are we seeing careers that are more profitable than ever with people acting as the room temp agencies and if you don't brand yourself, do you get left in the dust."

I'm going to start with the 2nd question 1st. The simple answer is, "No." It helps, but you won't necessarily get left in the dust. People who have branded themselves are clearly advantaged over those who haven't. Let me just take a minute and talk about the rules of job hunting these days.

The basic rule of job hunting is to remain marketable. Marketable doesn't mean that you have great skills work that you are the most competent although that's my position to put yourself in. Marketable really translates into salable. You possess something that is salable. Skills and competence are only one element of being salable. Do you have a charismatic quality about you? Do you have a way of engendering trust that causes people to want to take a chance on you? Thus there are other qualities that come into play beyond simply marketability and being salable.

People found work back in the Stone Ages when I started recruiting in 1972. They work for a company that had a great brand or even a mediocre brand. It is always a lot easier to work for a firm with a good brand because you have a halo by association.

These days, that still exists. After all, if I said someone worked for Google, you would probably have a very positive association with the Google brand the transfers to them. You might think they were smarts. You might think they were an elite individual. You might think they were very intelligent, as well as a number of other factors that can associate with the Google brand.

People used to find jobs to, "the old boys club." The old boys club has been joined by, "the all girls club," as well as any number of individuals that some function as support groups for different groups of individuals that provide mentorship and advocacy for career development.

Recruiters existed then in the exists now. Trade groups existed then and now. Alumni associations. All these were tools that support a networking back in The Stone Ages and still exist today.

The real thing that has changed since when I start recruiting a social networking and the ability to brand oneself, branding apart from the organization.

How do you do that and is that particularly important? Answering starts off at the 1st part of the question that the person asked (Are people being successful by in effect running the room temp agency). I want to address that by talking about running one's own temp agency, but by owning one's own career instead of surrendering one's responsibility for their career to their employer.

Back in the 50s, 60s and 70s in the US, if you went to work for a "good company" at age 20, you expected to work there until you got the gold watch. Obviously, that doesn't exist anymore. Why would you want to surrender responsibility for your life as well as the health and welfare of your family to an organization whose goals are probably very different than yours? An organization who at times may have to make very specific business decisions in order to protect their firm that may impact your family? Clearly we have learned that over the last few recessions and that were back here again talking about the same issues.

What personal branding does is allow you to develop a reputation apart from your organization. For example, I used to be associated with a recruiting firm in New York, but have clearly developed the brand as "The Big Game Hunter" apart from that organization by writing a number of books, blogging, articles, videos, podcasts, and a number of other ways that allows me to be separate from that firm so that you have an impression of me. Apart from that organization. Thus, when I did recruiting, when organizations were trying to hire leaders and staff, often they thought of me and The Big Game Hunter , apart from the organization I was associated with.

That could exist for you as well because 1 of the things you need to do in order to promote your career is to develop a personal brand. Whether that will allow you to do is to passively look for work.

Why would you want to do that if you are really happy doing what you are currently doing? The answer is pretty clear in that the people who get ahead aren't always the smartest or work the hardest, even though there is a great qualities to have. People get ahead of the ones who remain alert to opportunity. Sometimes those are internal to the organization; more often than not, they are external. What personal branding and social networking allow you to do is develop a reputation and image of being an expert.

More often than not, what I'm talking about is a white collar phenomena. For blue-collar workers, I'm not sure how someone who is works in construction or landscaping develops a personal brand in the way that I'm talking about. There might be but am not aware of how it is done for employees of those firms. It is a reputation for hard work and reliability. But how you develop that reputation at your job and have people talking about you so that others learn about you?

In the white-collar marketplaces, it is a lot easier because you can create a brand through blogging, networking, social media that allow recruiters both third-party and corporate recruiters to want to find you. There are times that you would receive an email or the phone is going to ring because people have learned something about you. They see an article that you've written, a LinkedIn profile that interests them that allows them to find out about you and be curious about YOU and YOUR experience and what YOU have done and what you can deliver to another organization.

There are times that the phone is good be raining and it is (Knock. Knock. Knock), "It's opportunity knocking," and someone to call you, email you or inMail you and say something to the effect of, "I'm doing a search for client and your background looks interesting for this role and then want to have a chance to chat with you." You may be happy in the job but if someone offered to youth $50,000 more or $5000 more, depending upon where you are in your life, as well as an opportunity to do work that is more interesting to you than what you are doing now with people who are quite talented, why would you be interested? Although it might involve risk, it would certainly be worth exploring the opportunity. Later on, you can decide it is not worth doing. The idea very simply, is to always be open to the possibility of another job.

This certainly became true in the 70s and beyond, but given the labor markets as they exist today. I'm going to reiterate what I've been telling people for more than 40 years now, you are the CEO of your organization. If your organization went out of business, you are still responsible for earning an income for your family, right?

You need to think of what you can to protect your interests and advance them. It people change jobs with some regularity, doing the strategic job change was some regularity (I'm not talking about every 6 months but every few years), it will allow people to have a catapult to their income that can be quite significant.

For example, if you are an administrative assistant in change jobs for $5000 raise, and in 3 years you change jobs for an additional $5000, the probability is that in succeeding years (watch the math on this). You would ever earn $35,000 more in base salary plus raises along the way. Thus, you would've earned somewhere between $36,000 and $40,000 in additional income just by making 2 job changes.

I'm not telling you to go out and look for job. I'm just pointing out that you have to look out for your own career planning so that you look after your own interests, because your employer is in for looking out for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The New LinkedIn Profile (VIDEO)


LinkedIn has changed its profile page. How should you change yours?

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about the new LinkedIn profile because it is a little bit different and it requires you to think a little bit differently about the visuals on the page.

When you look at the new profile now your initial reaction may be that looks pretty similar to the old one. However, notice how the summary area is now part of the opening box. Notice how the screen is initially somewhat limited as to what you are able to see. What it tells me is (1) , your headline has to be particularly good. It's going to include the name of your current company, plus the University that you attended. It doesn't tell anyone about your degree, but it just displays your most recent university, where you're located and how many network connections you have. LinkedIn always limits the number that they display in terms of the number of connections. I am someone with 17,000+1st level connections and they say 500+.

Here is one change so I thought was interesting. The summary is that is displayed is initially limited to 2 lines. There was the drop down to see more and what you would come to expect in the summary area from LinkedIn now appears that you now have to click the drop-down. It's now saying that the 1st 2 lines of your summary are most important.

There's another thing that's a little bit different. It has access to your most recent media posts in one way or another, who has viewed your profile and the number of your shares, articles that you've written and then and there is something that is not obvious-- on the most recent experience, it is they are in full. Previous jobs require that you use the drop down for anyone to see what is there. Your. Most recent job is what is being emphasized. Then, there were the number of people who have endorsed you and what I saw initially (and it is not apparent right now), the profile now really emphasizes the 1st 3. I've open this up, but I saw before that the 1st 3 items are the highlighted areas. I'm going to make a few shifts you to move up a few things because I have a number of them that are more relevant as result of changing my career to coaching.

Then, LinkedIn displays a few of your recommendations, accomplishments, but notice that it is limited now. Only a few are listed on everything else is a drop-down. I just to use organizations for networking group I belong to… That is the one that is there. One certification. There the rest of my books. Drop downs are much more prevalent on the page in the new LinkedIn profile. There are a few the groups I am a member of listed.

What it is telling me is (1) your most recent job is most important. (2) if you look off to the side. They want me to change my photo. They seem as though they're going to ask for updates from time to time.

The biggest change seems to be how they are displaying the summary where they are showing the 1st 2 lines of it instead of the whole thing unless you use the drop down, I want you to think in terms of what the 1st want to lines of your summary say and how you can presented most effectively on the profile. Perhaps the 1st 2 lines of your summary are keyword rich in order to emphasize the fact that that is something that people are visually seeing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Give Yourself an Advantage on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE EZINE IS NOW, “NO BS COACHING ADVICE.”


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an easy to follow strategy to help you stand out from the pack on LinkedIn.

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about this simple strategy to stand out from people on LinkedIn.

The hard thing to do on LinkedIn is differentiating yourself from others. There are so many hundreds of millions of people on LinkedIn right now. With so many recruiters both agency and corporate recruiters searching, they are going to LinkedIn to find talent. How do you stand out?

Obviously, you have to write a great profile; I'm not going to talk with you about that today. I'm going to talk with you about using the feature that will help you look good when someone finds your profile. The feature that I'm referring to is endorsements.

Endorsements are different than the testimonials that have been around for years. Testimonials of those long, long descriptions of how wonderful human being you are, written by someone who knows you very well. They are like LinkedIn's version of a traditional reference. If you have someone write a testimonial for you . Who doesn't know you very well, it stinks. You don't want to have anyone right one for you. Who doesn't know your work very well.

Endorsements, on the other hand, is a function where you or they can select the option that you possess that they believe you should be endorsed for. All they have to do is click the checkbox. What is the impression is created if someone has no endorsements? What is the impression created if someone has 150 endorsements? Or 500+ endorsements? Or lots and lots of endorsements for different attributes?

If you go to my LinkedIn profile, you can search for my name (the headline under my name now says, "Helping People and Companies Play Big! Let Me Coach You."), What you will see is a whole bunch of endorsements of people and given to me.

I know recruiters aren't thought very highly of and I did that kind of work for more than 40 years. When you see someone like me with lots and lots of endorsements, that is unusual. Don't you think I wanted more me than someone who might have no endorsements? Or 2? Or 12? Of course you do.

Both with my brand, The Big Game Hunter, and with strategic use of endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn and on my website.

What you want to be doing is asking people who you are connected to, you know you professionally and personally, to endorse you for something that you do or have done and have strong skills. You do this not once or twice but repeatedly, particularly when you're not actively looking for work, will cause you to stand out.

The truth is you want people to be reaching out to you, not when you are looking for a job, desperate, out of work and looking for work. You want people reaching out to you when you are a "happy camper."

Why do I say that? It's really simple. Employers have a bias toward people who are working and who they perceive are not actively looking for work. That bias causes them to value those people at a higher level than the person that they find the job board. Third-party recruiters think the same thing, too. It's amazing! I could go into detail about why it's ridiculous, but, the long and the short of it is, what you want to do is be found. You want to be found by organizations there looking on LinkedIn and thinking that you are not someone who is actively looking for work and thought a very highly. That "thought a very highly part" comes from endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn.

So, if you have friends, if you are connected to people who are willing to do you a favor, ask them to endorse you, not write a testimonial for you. You will start noticing that the number of people reaching out to you to connect will start to take off.

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE ZINE IS NOW, "NO BS COACHING ADVICE."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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