Getting Known on LinkedIn | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/10/getting-known-on-linkedin/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to become known on LinkedIn as a subject matter expert and explains how to do it.
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”
JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.
Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook
You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”
Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

The Most Underutilized Feature on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

 

Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter offers advice about using the most underutilized feature of LinkedIn as part of your job search.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 1 of the most underutilized features on LinkedIn – – applications. But we're talking about applications. Were not talking about applying for jobs. We are talking about programs that are built into LinkedIn to provide additional services that are available for you to use for free. They may allow you to do something very simple-- put a resume on your LinkedIn profile. Put work samples or presentations that you've done. Useful information that people can pick up on on your LinkedIn profile.

Have you written a book? You can make reference to it on your LinkedIn profile. Applications are more than just things like this. It is a way that LinkedIn tries to be more social than their base product tends to be.

For your convenience, why don't have that presentation that you did 2 years ago, those powerpoints as part of your presentation, available on your LinkedIn profile to slideshare. Why not make it easier for people to find your resume by having it on your profile? They can actually see how you eat your backroom fits the job that they are recruiting for.

That's my reminder for today. Come over and look at LinkedIn profiles and spend some time playing around with the applications and see how they fit you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What LinkedIn Summary Should I Have to Attract Recruiters (VIDEO)


Recruiters are constantly scouring LinkedIn for candidates. What LinkedIn summary should you have to attract recruiters?

Summary

"What LinkedIn summary should I have to attract recruiters?" As is the case of most of these questions, the sender hasn't put themselves in the position of being a recruiter. I don't do that kind of work anymore but I did for more than 40; I have a good perspective on it.

The 1st part of the question is, "how to attract recruiters." From there, once you understand the recruiters are finding people on LinkedIn, it becomes clearer.

When someone is looking on LinkedIn to find someone to fill a job with the client, they do keywords in order to do a search. Thus, whether is your profile or specifically the summary area of your profile, it needs to be keyword rich in order to demonstrate a fit.

Now, I would think more in terms of your profile and then, from there, use the summary is a summary of what you will attributes are.

When I think of who might be writing this question, I think they might be a less experienced person. Thus, what you want to be doing is writing about what your background really is. That's because when you write your profile you want to write one That is all inclusive… A laundry list of stuff. You want to make your summary as concise as possible (I'm not talking about brevity, per se), but you want to create incident someone looking at your profile clearly understands what your strengths are. After all, you don't want to do pointless interviews, do you? Zero it in and let the rest of the profile be keyword rich in order to draw people to the page.

From there, what I always tell people to do, is put a phone number and email address in your summary. Why? Because LinkedIn charges about $11 per inMail to message you and you are not on LinkedIn all the time To respond to inMails and messages that you receive. The fastest way for recruiter to contact you is not by spending $11 or $12 waiting for you to go online, But, instead, calling you or emailing you.Putting this information in your summary makes it easier for them to contact you… That expedites it for them by making it easier for you them to contact you…That is what you said you wanted when you wrote, right? It isn't enough to just get the view page. You want to get them to contact you.

In addition, if you have a premium account of some sort,Just checking to see who looked at your profile and who hasn't contacted you. From there, what you do is reach out to them, Message them and simply say, "LinkedIn told me that you would look at my profile. Let's connect. Is there anything I can be doing to help you? Is there something you are looking for in my background that you didn't see which I can address in the conversation?" What this does is flush them out so that you have an opportunity to connect with them.

Again, use the profile for a lot of keywords and the summary area to summarize what a lot of your attributes are. If you are a more senior individual. This becomes even more important.

So, zero in In the summary, give them an easy way to contact with you And you will get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

LinkedIn Profile Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2012)

NOTE: IF I REFER TO ANY OPEN POSITIONS, THEY WERE FILLED YEARS AGO. I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. I DO JOB SEARCH COACHING.

You know your LinkedIn profile is important, yet people make lots of mistakes that I speak about today.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Second Most Important Place on Your LinkedIn Profile | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the second most important place for you to write about in your Linked in profile.

Summary

I'm going to speak about the second most important area on your LinkedIn profile. Just to get it out of the way, the most important area is the line underneath your name. Between your name and outline, you are guiding people to what it is that you do. It needs to be quick and punchy to draw attention for people so that they are interested in going further.

The second most important area, the one that gets sorely neglected is your summary. Too often, I see summaries that are four or five lines long. Why can't you say more about yourself and create a section that is keyword rich that talks about your role and responsibilities and achievements in a generic sense, and then going to more specifics in the rest of your profile.

You can say, for So and So, I did such and such, reducing costs by X number of dollars or increasing sales by Y number of dollars.

Don't sell it short. Don't neglect it because it is the first place that a person's eyes go to after they've seen your name and the line underneath your name.

Sequencing it, it is your name, the line underneath your name, your summary, who you work for now, and then people's eyes bounce up to the summary again if it is good.

If it isn't good, it's a waste of time. People will go right to what you are doing now. You've missed an opportunity to persuade them.

A summary gives you a selling opportunity that you should neglect. If you use it well, you have an opportunity to really shine to a reader.

If you like, I have a few punchy comments in mind including my number in LinkedIn (I'm number 7653), as well as how I score on Myers-Briggs, DISC and Core MAP.

I talk about how I filled more than 1000 positions.

It's stuff like that that gets a reader's attention.

After all, is a certain amount that's pretty standard if you do recruiting. How radically different is that? Enhancements around that are what really make me stand out. Then when people go further and they see the YouTube videos I've done, the books I've written the podcasts I host and all the other things I do, I really shine.

Look for opportunities for yourself to stand out from the pack by using the second most important section of your LinkedIn profile and the one that is probably most neglected.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Personal Branding and Job Search (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the basic rules of job hunting and how branding contributes to that.

Summary

Yesterday, I received an email from someone who asked the wonderful question. "Are we seeing careers that are more profitable than ever with people acting as the room temp agencies and if you don't brand yourself, do you get left in the dust."

I'm going to start with the 2nd question 1st. The simple answer is, "No." It helps, but you won't necessarily get left in the dust. People who have branded themselves are clearly advantaged over those who haven't. Let me just take a minute and talk about the rules of job hunting these days.

The basic rule of job hunting is to remain marketable. Marketable doesn't mean that you have great skills work that you are the most competent although that's my position to put yourself in. Marketable really translates into salable. You possess something that is salable. Skills and competence are only one element of being salable. Do you have a charismatic quality about you? Do you have a way of engendering trust that causes people to want to take a chance on you? Thus there are other qualities that come into play beyond simply marketability and being salable.

People found work back in the Stone Ages when I started recruiting in 1972. They work for a company that had a great brand or even a mediocre brand. It is always a lot easier to work for a firm with a good brand because you have a halo by association.

These days, that still exists. After all, if I said someone worked for Google, you would probably have a very positive association with the Google brand the transfers to them. You might think they were smarts. You might think they were an elite individual. You might think they were very intelligent, as well as a number of other factors that can associate with the Google brand.

People used to find jobs to, "the old boys club." The old boys club has been joined by, "the all girls club," as well as any number of individuals that some function as support groups for different groups of individuals that provide mentorship and advocacy for career development.

Recruiters existed then in the exists now. Trade groups existed then and now. Alumni associations. All these were tools that support a networking back in The Stone Ages and still exist today.

The real thing that has changed since when I start recruiting a social networking and the ability to brand oneself, branding apart from the organization.

How do you do that and is that particularly important? Answering starts off at the 1st part of the question that the person asked (Are people being successful by in effect running the room temp agency). I want to address that by talking about running one's own temp agency, but by owning one's own career instead of surrendering one's responsibility for their career to their employer.

Back in the 50s, 60s and 70s in the US, if you went to work for a "good company" at age 20, you expected to work there until you got the gold watch. Obviously, that doesn't exist anymore. Why would you want to surrender responsibility for your life as well as the health and welfare of your family to an organization whose goals are probably very different than yours? An organization who at times may have to make very specific business decisions in order to protect their firm that may impact your family? Clearly we have learned that over the last few recessions and that were back here again talking about the same issues.

What personal branding does is allow you to develop a reputation apart from your organization. For example, I used to be associated with a recruiting firm in New York, but have clearly developed the brand as "The Big Game Hunter" apart from that organization by writing a number of books, blogging, articles, videos, podcasts, and a number of other ways that allows me to be separate from that firm so that you have an impression of me. Apart from that organization. Thus, when I did recruiting, when organizations were trying to hire leaders and staff, often they thought of me and The Big Game Hunter , apart from the organization I was associated with.

That could exist for you as well because 1 of the things you need to do in order to promote your career is to develop a personal brand. Whether that will allow you to do is to passively look for work.

Why would you want to do that if you are really happy doing what you are currently doing? The answer is pretty clear in that the people who get ahead aren't always the smartest or work the hardest, even though there is a great qualities to have. People get ahead of the ones who remain alert to opportunity. Sometimes those are internal to the organization; more often than not, they are external. What personal branding and social networking allow you to do is develop a reputation and image of being an expert.

More often than not, what I'm talking about is a white collar phenomena. For blue-collar workers, I'm not sure how someone who is works in construction or landscaping develops a personal brand in the way that I'm talking about. There might be but am not aware of how it is done for employees of those firms. It is a reputation for hard work and reliability. But how you develop that reputation at your job and have people talking about you so that others learn about you?

In the white-collar marketplaces, it is a lot easier because you can create a brand through blogging, networking, social media that allow recruiters both third-party and corporate recruiters to want to find you. There are times that you would receive an email or the phone is going to ring because people have learned something about you. They see an article that you've written, a LinkedIn profile that interests them that allows them to find out about you and be curious about YOU and YOUR experience and what YOU have done and what you can deliver to another organization.

There are times that the phone is good be raining and it is (Knock. Knock. Knock), "It's opportunity knocking," and someone to call you, email you or inMail you and say something to the effect of, "I'm doing a search for client and your background looks interesting for this role and then want to have a chance to chat with you." You may be happy in the job but if someone offered to youth $50,000 more or $5000 more, depending upon where you are in your life, as well as an opportunity to do work that is more interesting to you than what you are doing now with people who are quite talented, why would you be interested? Although it might involve risk, it would certainly be worth exploring the opportunity. Later on, you can decide it is not worth doing. The idea very simply, is to always be open to the possibility of another job.

This certainly became true in the 70s and beyond, but given the labor markets as they exist today. I'm going to reiterate what I've been telling people for more than 40 years now, you are the CEO of your organization. If your organization went out of business, you are still responsible for earning an income for your family, right?

You need to think of what you can to protect your interests and advance them. It people change jobs with some regularity, doing the strategic job change was some regularity (I'm not talking about every 6 months but every few years), it will allow people to have a catapult to their income that can be quite significant.

For example, if you are an administrative assistant in change jobs for $5000 raise, and in 3 years you change jobs for an additional $5000, the probability is that in succeeding years (watch the math on this). You would ever earn $35,000 more in base salary plus raises along the way. Thus, you would've earned somewhere between $36,000 and $40,000 in additional income just by making 2 job changes.

I'm not telling you to go out and look for job. I'm just pointing out that you have to look out for your own career planning so that you look after your own interests, because your employer is in for looking out for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Getting on the Radar | Job Search Radio


Whether you are actively or passively looking for work, you need to do things to get on the radar of the differnt people who will be trying to hire talent. Jeff and David Perry, the head headhunter for Perry-Martel International and author or co-author of 5 books including, “Guerilla Marketing for Job Hunters” discuss the mistakes people make with their LinkedIn profiles, how to make them stronger and an example of someone who David helped find a divisional President’s position for with a firm many times larger than his current one at a compensation at least 3 times larger than what he was currently earning that all started with powering up his LinkedIn profile.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

The New LinkedIn Profile (VIDEO)


LinkedIn has changed its profile page. How should you change yours?

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about the new LinkedIn profile because it is a little bit different and it requires you to think a little bit differently about the visuals on the page.

When you look at the new profile now your initial reaction may be that looks pretty similar to the old one. However, notice how the summary area is now part of the opening box. Notice how the screen is initially somewhat limited as to what you are able to see. What it tells me is (1) , your headline has to be particularly good. It's going to include the name of your current company, plus the University that you attended. It doesn't tell anyone about your degree, but it just displays your most recent university, where you're located and how many network connections you have. LinkedIn always limits the number that they display in terms of the number of connections. I am someone with 17,000+1st level connections and they say 500+.

Here is one change so I thought was interesting. The summary is that is displayed is initially limited to 2 lines. There was the drop down to see more and what you would come to expect in the summary area from LinkedIn now appears that you now have to click the drop-down. It's now saying that the 1st 2 lines of your summary are most important.

There's another thing that's a little bit different. It has access to your most recent media posts in one way or another, who has viewed your profile and the number of your shares, articles that you've written and then and there is something that is not obvious-- on the most recent experience, it is they are in full. Previous jobs require that you use the drop down for anyone to see what is there. Your. Most recent job is what is being emphasized. Then, there were the number of people who have endorsed you and what I saw initially (and it is not apparent right now), the profile now really emphasizes the 1st 3. I've open this up, but I saw before that the 1st 3 items are the highlighted areas. I'm going to make a few shifts you to move up a few things because I have a number of them that are more relevant as result of changing my career to coaching.

Then, LinkedIn displays a few of your recommendations, accomplishments, but notice that it is limited now. Only a few are listed on everything else is a drop-down. I just to use organizations for networking group I belong to… That is the one that is there. One certification. There the rest of my books. Drop downs are much more prevalent on the page in the new LinkedIn profile. There are a few the groups I am a member of listed.

What it is telling me is (1) your most recent job is most important. (2) if you look off to the side. They want me to change my photo. They seem as though they're going to ask for updates from time to time.

The biggest change seems to be how they are displaying the summary where they are showing the 1st 2 lines of it instead of the whole thing unless you use the drop down, I want you to think in terms of what the 1st want to lines of your summary say and how you can presented most effectively on the profile. Perhaps the 1st 2 lines of your summary are keyword rich in order to emphasize the fact that that is something that people are visually seeing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Give Yourself an Advantage on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE EZINE IS NOW, “NO BS COACHING ADVICE.”


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an easy to follow strategy to help you stand out from the pack on LinkedIn.

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about this simple strategy to stand out from people on LinkedIn.

The hard thing to do on LinkedIn is differentiating yourself from others. There are so many hundreds of millions of people on LinkedIn right now. With so many recruiters both agency and corporate recruiters searching, they are going to LinkedIn to find talent. How do you stand out?

Obviously, you have to write a great profile; I'm not going to talk with you about that today. I'm going to talk with you about using the feature that will help you look good when someone finds your profile. The feature that I'm referring to is endorsements.

Endorsements are different than the testimonials that have been around for years. Testimonials of those long, long descriptions of how wonderful human being you are, written by someone who knows you very well. They are like LinkedIn's version of a traditional reference. If you have someone write a testimonial for you . Who doesn't know you very well, it stinks. You don't want to have anyone right one for you. Who doesn't know your work very well.

Endorsements, on the other hand, is a function where you or they can select the option that you possess that they believe you should be endorsed for. All they have to do is click the checkbox. What is the impression is created if someone has no endorsements? What is the impression created if someone has 150 endorsements? Or 500+ endorsements? Or lots and lots of endorsements for different attributes?

If you go to my LinkedIn profile, you can search for my name (the headline under my name now says, "Helping People and Companies Play Big! Let Me Coach You."), What you will see is a whole bunch of endorsements of people and given to me.

I know recruiters aren't thought very highly of and I did that kind of work for more than 40 years. When you see someone like me with lots and lots of endorsements, that is unusual. Don't you think I wanted more me than someone who might have no endorsements? Or 2? Or 12? Of course you do.

Both with my brand, The Big Game Hunter, and with strategic use of endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn and on my website.

What you want to be doing is asking people who you are connected to, you know you professionally and personally, to endorse you for something that you do or have done and have strong skills. You do this not once or twice but repeatedly, particularly when you're not actively looking for work, will cause you to stand out.

The truth is you want people to be reaching out to you, not when you are looking for a job, desperate, out of work and looking for work. You want people reaching out to you when you are a "happy camper."

Why do I say that? It's really simple. Employers have a bias toward people who are working and who they perceive are not actively looking for work. That bias causes them to value those people at a higher level than the person that they find the job board. Third-party recruiters think the same thing, too. It's amazing! I could go into detail about why it's ridiculous, but, the long and the short of it is, what you want to do is be found. You want to be found by organizations there looking on LinkedIn and thinking that you are not someone who is actively looking for work and thought a very highly. That "thought a very highly part" comes from endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn.

So, if you have friends, if you are connected to people who are willing to do you a favor, ask them to endorse you, not write a testimonial for you. You will start noticing that the number of people reaching out to you to connect will start to take off.

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE ZINE IS NOW, "NO BS COACHING ADVICE."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Why Am I Not Getting Emails from Recruiters? (VIDEO)


I am a gainfully employed data scientist with a solid career history and I have a good network in the data science community online. I am active on Twitter and have a LinkedIn profile. However, I have never received an email or message from a recruiter. What can I do to start getting recruited?

I think my answer is valid for any profession.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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