Making Your Job Search More Confidential


Everyone is concerned about privacy on Facebook but forgets about privacy and confidentiality when job hunting. Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests how to make your resume more confidential and how to set your Linkedin settings for better privacy when job hunting.

Summary

Let's talk today about confidentiality in the job search. Most people don't want their boss to find out that they are looking for work yet they do a lot of things that will expose themselves to their boss finding out that they are looking for work.

Let's start with talking about your resume in a way where is actually visible on the web. You don't think employers are looking for resumes and job boards in order to see which of their employees is looking for work? They do. Many firms look for resumes of their staff on job boards in an effort to find out who is looking, who was leaving and not to be caught short by resignation. When you stop and think of it, it is pretty smart on their part is? , What you've done is plant the seed of doubt in your mind that you are someone that they can trust.

As a result, if you post your resume on 1 of the major job boards, pay for a confidentiality future. It is not expensive and NOT USING IT can become very expensive for you.

I'm not making you money from this or any other recommendation on making today. I'll simply say that you should pay for the confidentiality feature; what it will do is encrypt your name in some long and ridiculous looking email address. It is worth it to you.

The 2nd thing is that you're smart to use LinkedIn in your job search, but are goofy for not changing some of your privacy settings. We also the think of Facebook and privacy because there been any number of situations where Facebook has changed its rules and made privacy an issue. We don't think about LinkedIn.

There are places where LinkedIn is broadcasting to connections of yours some of your actions. Do you really want that boss of yours with a colleague of yours to know that you're looking for job by see you all the recruiters that you are connecting with are seeing all the firms that you are now following on LinkedIn. The way to deal with your privacy settings is to go to your page on LinkedIn and look in the upper right for your name. Click on it and you'll see your settings there. Go to the privacy settings page and limit who can see your postings.

Turn off your activity broadcasts, select who can see your activity feed and select what others can see when they view your profile. Select who can see your connections. Like I said, you want your boss to see that you are connecting with a bunch of recruiters?

These are a few places that with privacy changes you can become a little bit more secretive about your behavior and confidential in your search using LinkedIn.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Should I Accept a LinkedIn Connection Request from a Recruiter?


Recently a recruiter from a big software company showed interest in hiring me on LinkedIn. He also sent me a connection request. It means if I don’t connect he might not move forward, and if I do, he might just get my contacts and move away!

 

Summary

I just got back from the gym so excuse me if I appear sweaty. I am sweaty!

I received a message for someone I think is a really good question: Should I accept a LinkedIn connection request from a recruiter? Recently, a recruiter for a big software for show interest in hiring me on LinkedIn. He also said the connection request. It means if I don’t connect, he might not move for and, if I do, you might just get my contacts and move away!

The fear that so many people have is incredible to me.

Start by saying that LinkedIn is selling the entire database to recruiters for about $400 per month, $450, something like that. Big software company? These guys have all that data are available to them. Don’t sweat that aspect of it.

The real question is if you are concerned about the impact of not accepting, then accept. However, if you are concerned that this recruiter is going to take your contacts from you, let me let you in on a secret. If you go your privacy settings on LinkedIn (you’ll find it in the upper right-hand corner of your homepage, behind that pretty little picture of you, click on it and one of the choices offered to you involves privacy for your account).
Click on the privacy option and you’ll see that you can block individual people and you are able to not share data with others. If you have any concerns about this individual, block them it’s really that simple. They will be able to see your updates; do not to be able to see your connection requests; they will be able to see any of the people in the network. You just going to block them. So this is a non-issue.

For you as a job hunter, I want to remind you of something. Your network is your net worth. Unlike days of all, where people were afraid of everything, we’ve all opened ourselves up. We’re trying to do more things to become known and noticed.

This recruiter may be trying to get a sense of you over time, maybe not for this job search but with the next one in mind. I will tell you that if he doesn’t hire you or she doesn’t hire you because you didn’t accept the connection request from them, they are idiots!

First of all, as a recruiter, they don’t hire anyone; hiring manager makes that decision. Maybe you don’t get in the door, but it’s unlikely. They have metrics on them about filling jobs. If you are the right talent, the hiring managers interested in hiring you, don’t sweat the decision not to connect with the recruiter.

The real important thing is that you need to connect with more recruiters, not less. More people need to know more about you. You can’t hide in the corner of the closet until such time as you’re looking for something else.

After all, the data is already out there about you. Let me show you. If you go to this little search tool, www.li-usa.info, do a search and what you’ll find is a Google search tool that searches every US LinkedIn profile that is available publicly.

You’re there. People can find you easily. I don’t know if it will let you see the connected with but, thanks for that is a possibility. As I’ve said, all the data is out there already. LinkedIn is selling it in droves. Don’t sweat this.

If anything, you should be going in the opposite direction by connecting with more people. I’ll tell you why.

A person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. The person who gets ahead is the one who remains open to opportunities. Sometimes, those are internal to organization. Most of the time, they are external to it.

If you’re hired by this big software firm, and a year from now, five years from now, 10 years from now, you decide to change jobs again. Do you want to be operating from that corner of the closet again or do you want more people to know about you? If you are smart, the latter is the right answer.

So, can it with this person and, if you have any concerns about them, block them using privacy settings.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Minimize How Recruiters Use Your Data


Did you know that recruiters are using your LinkedIn data to find people to place in new jobs? Here’s how to minimize that from happening.

 

Summary

There are a lot of different ways that recruiters are able to use people’s data to their own advantage. I’m going to walk you through a few things that you can do to minimize that from happening and save yourself some aggravation.

I say, “save yourself some aggravation,” because, while they are looking at your profile they are able to decide to never call you. Here’s how it works.

Who can see your connections? You can find this in the privacy and help settings by going to the top ribbon, all the way to the right where your photo or icon would be, you’ll find the drop down menu with that is an option. Once you are in the privacy and settings area, you’ll click, “Manage It.”

From there, you want to go to the privacy tab. They are, you can edit your public profile, who can see your connections (interesting! Do you want everyone to see your connections? Probably not. Change that you only you).

How you rank. If you’re someone like me you want everyone to see how you rank. If you are average Jane or Joe, you may be 1 million down from the top and not want to show that. Next is the fun one – – “viewers of this profile also viewed.”

If you look at your home LinkedIn page, you’ll see in the right column that there are other people appearing there with similar kinds of backgrounds to yours.

What recruiters, in effect, are doing is looking at a number of people have profiles at the same time without a lot of effort.

Good for recruiters. Bad for you. Why? Because a lot of you can’t stand up to competition. I also want to say that there is a different level of competition when job hunting in smaller cities versus larger ones (in smaller towns, there are fewer people competing for these jobs). The numbers in a large city make it less desirable to do this kind of stuff because “Look at this profile! There are 1000 more like it.”).

So when you look at, “viewers of this profile also looked at,” you want to change it to, “No,”and reduce your competition.

Followers. Choose who can view your public updates. Everyone! Opened up so people can find out more about you and create a brand impression.

This is a nice feature that allows you to communicate more openly with businesses and with people that you are connected with.

One last thing with regard to LinkedIn and networking. Be involved with groups. I’m sure that you’ve heard this before, LinkedIn advantages people who post regularly in four or more groups.

This may be hard for you to do unless you have community where you use public transportation. Then you have time to do something constructive for your career while you’re commuting.

Hear that message – – LinkedIn advantages people who actively participate in four or more groups.

 

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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