What LinkedIn Summary Should I Have to Attract Recruiters (VIDEO)


Recruiters are constantly scouring LinkedIn for candidates. What LinkedIn summary should you have to attract recruiters?

Summary

"What LinkedIn summary should I have to attract recruiters?" As is the case of most of these questions, the sender hasn't put themselves in the position of being a recruiter. I don't do that kind of work anymore but I did for more than 40; I have a good perspective on it.

The 1st part of the question is, "how to attract recruiters." From there, once you understand the recruiters are finding people on LinkedIn, it becomes clearer.

When someone is looking on LinkedIn to find someone to fill a job with the client, they do keywords in order to do a search. Thus, whether is your profile or specifically the summary area of your profile, it needs to be keyword rich in order to demonstrate a fit.

Now, I would think more in terms of your profile and then, from there, use the summary is a summary of what you will attributes are.

When I think of who might be writing this question, I think they might be a less experienced person. Thus, what you want to be doing is writing about what your background really is. That's because when you write your profile you want to write one That is all inclusive… A laundry list of stuff. You want to make your summary as concise as possible (I'm not talking about brevity, per se), but you want to create incident someone looking at your profile clearly understands what your strengths are. After all, you don't want to do pointless interviews, do you? Zero it in and let the rest of the profile be keyword rich in order to draw people to the page.

From there, what I always tell people to do, is put a phone number and email address in your summary. Why? Because LinkedIn charges about $11 per inMail to message you and you are not on LinkedIn all the time To respond to inMails and messages that you receive. The fastest way for recruiter to contact you is not by spending $11 or $12 waiting for you to go online, But, instead, calling you or emailing you.Putting this information in your summary makes it easier for them to contact you… That expedites it for them by making it easier for you them to contact you…That is what you said you wanted when you wrote, right? It isn't enough to just get the view page. You want to get them to contact you.

In addition, if you have a premium account of some sort,Just checking to see who looked at your profile and who hasn't contacted you. From there, what you do is reach out to them, Message them and simply say, "LinkedIn told me that you would look at my profile. Let's connect. Is there anything I can be doing to help you? Is there something you are looking for in my background that you didn't see which I can address in the conversation?" What this does is flush them out so that you have an opportunity to connect with them.

Again, use the profile for a lot of keywords and the summary area to summarize what a lot of your attributes are. If you are a more senior individual. This becomes even more important.

So, zero in In the summary, give them an easy way to contact with you And you will get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Second Most Important Place on Your LinkedIn Profile | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the second most important place for you to write about in your Linked in profile.

Summary

I'm going to speak about the second most important area on your LinkedIn profile. Just to get it out of the way, the most important area is the line underneath your name. Between your name and outline, you are guiding people to what it is that you do. It needs to be quick and punchy to draw attention for people so that they are interested in going further.

The second most important area, the one that gets sorely neglected is your summary. Too often, I see summaries that are four or five lines long. Why can't you say more about yourself and create a section that is keyword rich that talks about your role and responsibilities and achievements in a generic sense, and then going to more specifics in the rest of your profile.

You can say, for So and So, I did such and such, reducing costs by X number of dollars or increasing sales by Y number of dollars.

Don't sell it short. Don't neglect it because it is the first place that a person's eyes go to after they've seen your name and the line underneath your name.

Sequencing it, it is your name, the line underneath your name, your summary, who you work for now, and then people's eyes bounce up to the summary again if it is good.

If it isn't good, it's a waste of time. People will go right to what you are doing now. You've missed an opportunity to persuade them.

A summary gives you a selling opportunity that you should neglect. If you use it well, you have an opportunity to really shine to a reader.

If you like, I have a few punchy comments in mind including my number in LinkedIn (I'm number 7653), as well as how I score on Myers-Briggs, DISC and Core MAP.

I talk about how I filled more than 1000 positions.

It's stuff like that that gets a reader's attention.

After all, is a certain amount that's pretty standard if you do recruiting. How radically different is that? Enhancements around that are what really make me stand out. Then when people go further and they see the YouTube videos I've done, the books I've written the podcasts I host and all the other things I do, I really shine.

Look for opportunities for yourself to stand out from the pack by using the second most important section of your LinkedIn profile and the one that is probably most neglected.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Hangout With Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter: Overcoming Your Small LinkedIn Network


A simulcast of No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio on BlogTalkRadio.com

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Getting on the Radar | Job Search Radio


Whether you are actively or passively looking for work, you need to do things to get on the radar of the differnt people who will be trying to hire talent. Jeff and David Perry, the head headhunter for Perry-Martel International and author or co-author of 5 books including, “Guerilla Marketing for Job Hunters” discuss the mistakes people make with their LinkedIn profiles, how to make them stronger and an example of someone who David helped find a divisional President’s position for with a firm many times larger than his current one at a compensation at least 3 times larger than what he was currently earning that all started with powering up his LinkedIn profile.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

The New LinkedIn Profile (VIDEO)


LinkedIn has changed its profile page. How should you change yours?

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about the new LinkedIn profile because it is a little bit different and it requires you to think a little bit differently about the visuals on the page.

When you look at the new profile now your initial reaction may be that looks pretty similar to the old one. However, notice how the summary area is now part of the opening box. Notice how the screen is initially somewhat limited as to what you are able to see. What it tells me is (1) , your headline has to be particularly good. It's going to include the name of your current company, plus the University that you attended. It doesn't tell anyone about your degree, but it just displays your most recent university, where you're located and how many network connections you have. LinkedIn always limits the number that they display in terms of the number of connections. I am someone with 17,000+1st level connections and they say 500+.

Here is one change so I thought was interesting. The summary is that is displayed is initially limited to 2 lines. There was the drop down to see more and what you would come to expect in the summary area from LinkedIn now appears that you now have to click the drop-down. It's now saying that the 1st 2 lines of your summary are most important.

There's another thing that's a little bit different. It has access to your most recent media posts in one way or another, who has viewed your profile and the number of your shares, articles that you've written and then and there is something that is not obvious-- on the most recent experience, it is they are in full. Previous jobs require that you use the drop down for anyone to see what is there. Your. Most recent job is what is being emphasized. Then, there were the number of people who have endorsed you and what I saw initially (and it is not apparent right now), the profile now really emphasizes the 1st 3. I've open this up, but I saw before that the 1st 3 items are the highlighted areas. I'm going to make a few shifts you to move up a few things because I have a number of them that are more relevant as result of changing my career to coaching.

Then, LinkedIn displays a few of your recommendations, accomplishments, but notice that it is limited now. Only a few are listed on everything else is a drop-down. I just to use organizations for networking group I belong to… That is the one that is there. One certification. There the rest of my books. Drop downs are much more prevalent on the page in the new LinkedIn profile. There are a few the groups I am a member of listed.

What it is telling me is (1) your most recent job is most important. (2) if you look off to the side. They want me to change my photo. They seem as though they're going to ask for updates from time to time.

The biggest change seems to be how they are displaying the summary where they are showing the 1st 2 lines of it instead of the whole thing unless you use the drop down, I want you to think in terms of what the 1st want to lines of your summary say and how you can presented most effectively on the profile. Perhaps the 1st 2 lines of your summary are keyword rich in order to emphasize the fact that that is something that people are visually seeing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Why Am I Not Getting Emails from Recruiters? (VIDEO)


I am a gainfully employed data scientist with a solid career history and I have a good network in the data science community online. I am active on Twitter and have a LinkedIn profile. However, I have never received an email or message from a recruiter. What can I do to start getting recruited?

I think my answer is valid for any profession.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter?

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter? (VIDEO)


I’m concerned that my contacts will be harassed by recruiters if I accept a connection request from a recruiter.

 

Summary

This is a job search question that someone asked me that I thought would be a good one to answer. Most people tend to think of answering this in the "old way." The old way is it relevant anymore.

The old way is, "Do I need to worry about my contacts being hassled or harassed. If I accept the connection request from a recruiter?"

In the old way of thinking of things, if you accept the connection request from a recruiter, you would be inundated with connection requests that asked, "Would you introduce me to so-and-so. I would like to speak with them about a job." Maybe, you would be asked, "Do you think they would be interested in land in the Poconos?" All sorts of nonsense.

It isn't that way anymore because recruiters, salespeople, business executives don't need introductions to get contact information from LinkedIn. Putting aside the premium accounts for 2nd, there are Google chrome extensions that, as long as you are on a page for someone will reveal, generally very accurately, the email address for person and sometimes the phone number. Thus, if they want to reach out to someone, they can reach out by email to them as long as they are a 1st, 2nd, 3rd level connection with them or in a group with them.

For someone like me with 17,000+1st level connections, I can reach a hell of a lot of people in the US with that in a hell will want in a lot of other countries, too, because those chrome extensions are really quite good. In addition, for those of you who don't want to go through LinkedIn, there are Google custom search engines like www.LI-USA.info that searches all the LinkedIn public profiles in the United States. Once you have the profile up on your screen, you can use the chrome extension to get an email address. Thus, there's really no reason to worry about it.

What are the chrome extensions? My favorite one is candidate.ai (NOTE: They may be shutting down the extension shortly). Then, there is Prophet

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL!

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Can I Change My Location on LinkedIn | Job Search Radio

I am looking for a job out-of-state but I am being contacted by firms locally.

Summary

Someone asked this question of me:

"How can I tell LinkedIn. I am looking for work in another state?"  

"It always notifies me of jobs in my current state where I live and work.  I even get lots of recruiters contacting me for local work.  I want to have job show up from another state and have recruiters contact me for working in another state.  Other sites let me do this. How do I do it on LinkedIn?"

I want to start by saying people who have LinkedIn Recruiter accounts generally are not reading profiles.  They are running searches and the searches will indicate, just like a job board, where the person is,… You actually have to read the profile which a lot of people don't do.  They are just bulk email.  They're trying to reach out to people with particular skills and qualifications.  In addition, LinkedIn has its own search agents that are trying to forward jobs to you. You need to start changing the formula for your profile.

Just as an aside, in the summary area of your LinkedIn profile. I would include a statement that you are only looking for work in such and such area.  In addition, provide your phone number there.  Why?  For those who don't have a LinkedIn Recruiter account who who are using the free version or 1 of the lesser versions of LinkedIn to recruit people, at least you are trying to tell them.  If they choose to ignore you, you have no control over that.  Also, keyword the state, the city or cities that you are looking in, because once people are searching, they may be searching by a particular metro area.  For example, if you are looking for something in the New York area or Madison, Wisconsin. The bay area, LinkedIn has terms to refer to those places.  You may want to include those as part of the searches so that people will find you when they are doing a standard for research.

On the paved areas, you want to be attracted to people you go to the advanced search function set your location to, "located in or near" followed by the city or ZIP Code that you are looking for.  Using the example of New York, locate yourself in or near 10016.  That will take you to the heart of Manhattan and people will do searches (remember, this is how LinkedIn works) within a certain radius of that ZIP Code.  ZIP Code is always the preferable way, but because LinkedIn is having people search within a certain radius of the ZIP Code.  That's the easiest way to do it.  Again, just to repeat, use the advanced search function and set the location to located in or near followed by the ZIP Code, preferably you are looking for.

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

How Do You Use LinkedIn?

Find Jobs Your LinkedIn Connections Can Refer You To | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 608 LinkedIn was originally started to help people be referred to jobs by people that you knew.  Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains where this function is on LinkedIn.

 

Summary

This is a LinkedIn to that I know too few people use.

In the current version of LinkedIn, if you click on the tab on top for jobs, you are taken to a page that says, "Jobs You May Be Interested In." That is as far as most people get.

However, if you scroll down below that is a section that says, "Discover Jobs In Your Network." Reach out to your connections for referrals.

This was the original purpose of LinkedIn-- to have connections that can provide you with entrée to organizations that are hiring. That's really what this section is about.

There are people in your network who would (1) profit by doing the referral because there's an employee referral bonus that many of these people would receive and (2) you get the benefit of their recommendation because it is believed that they know something about you.

Check out "Discover Jobs In Your Network" by clicking on the jobs tab and by scrolling below the top item to this 2nd area, reach out your connections for a referral.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Should I Quit LinkedIn? (VIDEO)


I have a large network on LinkedIn but no one will help me. Should I quit LinkedIn?

 

Summary

The scenario that someone posed for me is, "I have a large network on LinkedIn, but my connections will do nothing to help me. Should I quit LinkedIn?"

Should this person quit LinkedIn? Hmmm.

No.

If you are like most people, you have collected connections as though you're making a pasta necklace . . You have been fighting macaroni to put on the necklace. You have no relationship with him whatsoever; you built up your numbers and they don't know you at all. You have done nothing to develop the relationship. Why should they help you? After all, have you help them? You don't know anything about them and they don't know anything about you.

The issue is that you have done nothing to connect with them as a human being beyond simply their being a number on your LinkedIn tally. Let me use myself as an example.

Jeff Altman. The Big Game Hunter. A headhunter, now coach, with a very noticeable brand. The Big Game Hunter. People reaching out to me all the time and 4 years, I would receive 20 or 30 connection request daily from people. I wasn't trying. People were reaching out to me because they like the brand. I wasn't accepting requests from everyone because I wasn't accepting them from people who are overseas (and I still don't accept them from overseas or from third-party recruiters).

The result when the being that I picked up numbers very quickly. Once they connected with me, I never heard from them again even though I sent them a request for a resume if they were looking for a job, even though I gave them a free subscription to an e-zine I published so that they can learn about job search. Nothing. Not a word. I suspect the same is true of you, too. It's kind of like on Facebook where you suddenly have friends because you collaborated with them on one of the games, suddenly you have a connection with them? What do you know about them that suddenly you are a "friend" with them on Facebook?

The same thing happens on LinkedIn. Unless you have developed a relationship with someone, they are not going to help you at all. Why should they?

I want to encourage you to (1) not just simply build your network numbers or connection numbers, but your relationship numbers. Reach out to them and see how you can help them in some way. Do things that will make you more prominent. For example, right before the publishing/blog platform. Do things like that in order to get noticed. Engaging groups for heaven sake! There are places on LinkedIn. We can make yourself more prominent for the work that you do.

You don't have to be THE subject matter expert. You can develop a reputation. For example, someone I am coaching now is a security professional is writing for the platform and releasing provocative material and, as he said to me yesterday, he is getting a lot of notice, not just simply by the numbers of people who are reading his articles, but based upon the number of contacts that are coming to him now in one way or another.

I'm going to put it back on you. You have to develop a relationship with people where they know, like and trust you. That is not going to happen overnight. You're going to have to work at this but judging by where you are in your career, you are relatively inexperienced and, thus, at this sense of entitlement that people should be helping you just because you are connected with them.

It doesn't work that way.

Start building relationships and start making it a network. Right now, it is not a network.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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