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It Starts With Courage

With appreciation to Lance Secretan

 

I remember my first day of kindergarten many years ago at PS 90 in The It Starts With CourageBronx, NY. My mother was an immigrant who spoke accented English, taking me to class two blocks from our apartment on The Grand Concourse. She and my teacher walked me to my desk and offered me the loveliest look that I could imagine. My mother told me that she would be back a little later to pick me up and that my teacher would be looking out for me.

After a while, I learned another lesson. The lesson was that if I were to succeed in school, my job was to shit up, do what I was told, regurgitate a bunch of things when I was told to do it . . . OR ELSE I wouldn’t get into a good college.

Some years later, I attended CCNY in Harlem. I attended my classes and lectures but quickly learned that the lesson of college I was being given was, “Shut up. Do what you are told. Regurgitate a bunch of stuff when we tell you OR ELSE,” I won’t get a good job.

And when I found my job in recruiting upon graduation, I learned a similar lesson– “Shut up. Do what you are told. Regurgitate a bunch of It Starts With Couragestuff when we tell you OR ELSE . . . “We’ll fire you! Is it any wonder that we live in times where people seem puzzled when they dedicate themselves to their employer, do their best and eventually are brought into a conference room and laid off. I have listened to many executives and staff alike lament about having done a great job and feeling betrayed.

“I did a great job!”

“My reviews were uniformly exceptional”

I keep hearing my own voice complaining about getting an B in a class when I thought I deserved an A. There was nothing I could say that would get the grade changed but I was seeking approval from an instructor who disagreed with my view of my work.

Yes, we all have bosses and teachers who evaluate our work. As a headhunter, I reported to the clients who paid me (and job hunters who didn’t pay me thought I reported to them), as well as to a business owner who demanded perfection from my work that was never achievable.

But the truth was I forgot the most important person who was part of my org structure.

Me.

You see, I fell prey to all the industrial conditioning I had received growing up wanting me to be “cooperative” or “a team player.” I lost track of myself with the push to be selfish in order to achieve sales goals (actual sales goals and, before that, grades).  I succumbed to the motivation (the external pressure to comply with institutions and systems that were making sausage) of the systems I lived and worked in and lost my inspiration (the internal desire, independent of external pressure for conformity).

I became a high achiever who really didn’t care but did great work. I became someone who kept looking for unique ways to do what I did differently than others yet still meet my performance goals.

I hated it because all I was doing was making “artisanal sausage” and not doing what I really wanted. Maybe that willingness to sacrifice is part of being adult. I just never really found the correct percentage of sacrifice vs. self-satisfaction.

I hope you have.

I was introduced to Lance Secretan and a model he has called, “The CASTLE® Principles

Courage

Authenticity

Service

Truthfulness

Love

Effectiveness.

 

Castle.

 

For a while, I wrestled with the idea of authenticity and truthfulness being redundant terms until I grew to see that authenticity was internal truthfulness or being genuine whereas truthfulness was how I might relate with the world at large.

However, as in the word, “Castle,” It truly does start with courage. It takes courage to face oneself and change.        It’s why I now coach instead of headhunt.

As a headhunter, I found too many instances where my truthfulness was encouraged to be compromised and, thus, my truthfulness disappear. It was hard to watch a large check evaporate into thin air after doing so much work.

I found not caring about the people I represented or my clients. The love was lost in what I did and in the people I was hired to serve.

As a result, my effectiveness started to wane, all because I lacked the courage to change.

 

It started with courage and the desire to live life on my terms according to these principles. I can help you, too.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunterwhat seems like one hundred years. His work involves executive job search coaching, business life coaching for self-employed people who have a lunatic for a boss and leadership coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in coaching from me?  Email me atJeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

What's at Risk for You to Change

What’s at Risk For You To Change? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter invites you to explore what’s at risk for you to change jobs or change your circumstances.

Summary

I use an example from a men's retreat group I have been involved with that most of you have created a bind for yourself about changing your career circumstances.

You are not happy with your current circumstances but are fearful that the next one will be more of the same. Thus, many of you are stuck in the paradox of "Damned if you do. Damed if you don't." In other words, stuck and paralyzed with indecision.

That's the risk many of you face and encourage you to face it (with support) because the worst thing that can happen if you change jobs and it dooesn't work out? You change jobs again! So what!

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Why Is Change So Hard?

Originally published at www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

I don’t know for sure how it is for you, but, for me, changing is no easy matter. I feel like every “I” must be dotted and ”t” crossed at least a dozen times before me to think it was even possible to consider taking a leap.

Years ago, when I decided to get my Masters while pursuing my existing career as a headhunter, I remember having to overcome my fear of returning to class after 25 years, making time out of my already busy schedule to attend class PLUS make more time for field work, my fear of feeling foolish, failing at both my current career and getting mediocre grades in school, subjecting myself to mocking by co-workers (recruiters are not particularly a sympathetic breed of animal by and large), my parents’ questioning (You have a good job. Why do you need to spend so much money), how I was going to do all the reading (it was common in one class to read a 400 page book weekly) and more.

I remember saying to myself, “I will eat and sleep work and school for a few weeks until I sort out how to do this,” and push aside anything else for a few months. The challenge of grad school and work was hard and has served me well for the past 18 months when I started coaching AND headhunting with an eye toward transitioning to full time coaching at the end of 2016.

The later in the year I got, the greater my fear and anxiety grew (I am not going to differentiate between the two in this article) until reaching its zenith during my final course for the year, amusingly enough called, “Inner Freedom.”

When I started to examine some of my physical reactions when my fear was heightened, I discovered some old triggers resurfacing. I remembered a time in first grade where a teacher slammed me against the back if my chair when I didn’t know the answer to 3+2 after being out of school for a week and very ill. I remembered times I failed in my mind, even though to others I had done extremely well and was very effective however my interpretation of the events as they unfolded minimized my help and emphasized my self-evaluated inadequacies.

I started to construct a logical plan to move forward with my coaching practice and constructed a simple blueprint: List what I was afraid of in excruciating detail. No item was too small or trivial to make the list. All that needed to happen was that it pop into my mind. Pretty easy, so far except I kept telling myself, “That isn’t important enough,” until I made the rule that required me to list it no matter what.

From there, next to each item, I started to list what I could do to minimize that item from occurring. For example, if I were afraid I might have no coaching clients, what could I do to minimize the likelihood of that occurring (to be clear, I am currently working with quite a few men and women around the United States regarding one professional or personal challenge or another. Reality has no basis for my fears).

My final step in addressing my logical mind was to ask myself, “If all else fails, what could I do if I failed at this? What could I do to return to my previous circumstances?” That was a very easy way to address . . . all I needed to do was return to my current career.

And admit failure.

That was a painful one for me. I HATE to fail (You, too, huh). I like to present myself as an expert and am in most situations I step into. But if this one didn’t work out, I would have to confess that I was unsuccessful marketing myself effectively. “It wasn’t that I was a bad coach,” I reminded myself. I just didn’t market myself well.

All of this didn’t address the emotional side of my struggle. I know that in our current world, people are being asked to think mathematically in terms of risk when making decisions. For me, logic was an incomplete measure. For me, the emotional component standing in my way, as illogical as it seemed, was that no one would want to hear what I had to say.

I found that along the way, I accepted the industrial age programming that my parents, the schools I attended, even my employers instilled in me to, “Shut up. Do what I am told. Regurgitate a bunch of stuff on command . . . or else.”

Or else I wouldn’t get into a college.

Or else I wouldn’t get a good job.

Or else I would be fired.

This was all the nonsense of voices in my mind that I heard from others, took on as my own, and that had inhibited me in so many ways. Any of you have voices in your head that aren’t really your own and inhibit you?

I have always been a strong performer but all the programming said, “Don’t take the risk! You could fail!!”

So back to the list I went to look up, “You could fail,” and saw, “Anything is possible but if you do, you can always go back to recruiting. It might take a few months to become productive again but you can always go back.”

What holds you back? What is the story you have been telling yourself to keep yourself small and avoid the career, business or life you want?

Working with a coach provides you with different eyes and ears on a problems and can give you a missing perspective on what you are wrestling with.

Great athletes and entertainers all have coaches. Many business leaders do, too. All of them develop relationships with their coaches that gives them perspective on their leadership and their lives.

Make the new year your best ever.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2016

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

Ready to schedule your first coaching session?

Change is Coming | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to anticipate change and get support now.

 

Summary

This is going to be a quirky podcasts for me and an important one for you.  Most of the time, I talked about how you can tactically deal with job hunting – – I help you with resumes, I talked with you about how to handle interview questions and negotiate salary, a whole host of things related to job. On this show, I want to go “bigger picture.”

The bigger picture is that, when you find a job now, most of you make the mistake of thinking it’s all over. I’ve got my job. Yippee! I’m done.

What you need is someone to work with you over the course of your career who is someone you can bounce ideas off of.  Someone who can give you advice about how to handle professional situations.

You know.  A coach.  You may think you have that person place, but you really don’t.  That’s because you never call upon them.  You never reach out to them for advice.  That’s what I want to talk with you candidly right now.

If you think your professional circumstances are safe now, you are mistaken.  Change is clearly a part of our life landscape. Let me give you perspective for my career.

I started off in recruiting in 1972.  At that time, you deliver the resume by US mail. Then, he progressed to the messenger delivering resumes in your local city.  He used the messenger service.  Then you hired your own messenger. Then, this great thing happened – – the fax machine.  The fax machine is limiting the job of the messenger, just like the messenger cost jobs at the post office.  Now, obviously, we use email.

Now, we do recruiting, not by waiting for resumes to arrive in our inbox through the mail, not by waiting for fax, waiting for it to be emailed.  Now, we are finding people aggressively online using a variety of different tools where we can research people online and find them.

When push comes to shove, in that simple illustration, I probably talked about 9 or 10 different changes, all of which cost jobs.  In doing the research, you are impacting jobs at job boards.  When job boards came around, did anyone use a fax machine anymore? No.  It’s built into the software or PCs and we never use it anyway

the point I’m trying to make is that, in your career, you’re going to need to anticipate the changes in your career.  You will need to be proactive in order to position yourself in a way that allows you to stand out from others.  This isn’t simply about branding because branding is only one aspect of it.  You have to anticipate that the firm you are working for. Could go out of business tomorrow. With the change.

Now, I know a lot of you are thinking, “That can’t happen to me.  I work for Megalopolysis, the biggest and most important firm in the field.” 

Didn’t the recession teach you anything about safety, at firms?  Lord knows, there were millions and millions of people throughout the world who thought their jobs were safe and their careers were well positioned because they work for good firms.  These people all went up out on their butts.  People at Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns before that… We can go through all sorts of firms where people did great work and, through no fault of theirs. The sand shifted under their feet and they wound up being out of a job.  Painfully out of a job.

My encouragement for you is to get someone to sit and talk with.

I’m available and, yes, I do charge for the service but we can do it through LivePerson.com we are a 10 minute session may cost you less than $50.  We can get a quote acquainted and set up something quarterly where we talk.  You need someone to bounce ideas off of you has the experience that I have, is a subject matter expert around job search, who does career coaching for many many years. I want to help you.

You need a trusted advisor to work with to ensure that you don’t wind up losing going forward.  Reach out to me through LivePerson.com where I am a job search and career coaching expert. I’ll be happy to answer your questions. Happy to set up a schedule where we can work together for many years so that you are well-positioned going forward in your career and you don’t get caught short.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Change It Had To Come – Job Search Radio

I learned something a long time ago– you can swim with the flow of the river or swim against it. If you decide to swim against it, the likelihood is that you will drown.

Summary

I want to talk to you older workers for a second about something that I know you know on one level is happening but on other levels you deny how it’s going to affect you and it winds up costing you your career. That is the notion of change. Let me use my career as an example.

When I started recruiting in the 1970s, the hot technology was COBOL. Ultimately, what happens is that things changed “in different technologies became the “hot technology.” Those technologies changed and new things replace them. This is an about the hot technology and what is hot in the market; it is about the need to adapt.

I remember when COBOL was becoming passé and people were starting to use minicomputers, programming languages are completely irrelevant now. They were recruiters who were saying, “there are no COBOL jobs and I have these great COBOL people,” and they didn’t adapt.

If you look at your field, the one that you’re working in now, and the changes that you’ve seen over your proof career or long career, you’ll see that things have changed.

You can argue with them and say to yourself, “I don’t want to have to learn this stuff,” and concede the fact that your career will come to an end because there are people who will want to learn that stuff, who do want to become involved with those things that are new, and desirable. It’s not like you’re going to be the best and that new thing, but you need to get some experience with whatever that thing is that is the new thing in your field.

You need to keep attending conferences. You need to keep paying attention. Reading trade publications, understanding what the change is how to adapt with it, and making the change, as well.

For you, unless you do this, let’s skip ahead a few years. There will be some version of recession. When firms start evaluating who to cut, unless you have adapted, you are an expensive item to. That’s true especially knowing the old stuff.

You always have to learn “new.” You always have to adapt, or else, otherwise, I’m going to start calling you “Dino,” for the dinosaur – – a legacy in your division. An old timer. The person who they tell stories about or jokes about at the office as the person who missed the opportunity to be on the cutting edge. Who missed out and made the decision that cost them their career.

There are so many instances I have seen of people who made this mistake, who hang on for dear life. The truth is if you learn the new stuff,, even if they do cut you (after all, there’s no guarantee that they won’t), you can find another position or contract work during the down times because you know the new stuff and you have experience with the new stuff.

Stay up-to-date with your field. Make sure your current and, if there are so many things that make it hard, to the best! Just don’t get stuck in the mindset that says, “Something else.Ugh,” and started to whine about it. No one likes a whiner, no matter what the subject is. Don’t become the office complainer.

Adapt. Spearhead the change. Encourage other people to adapt as well. You will wind up being a survivor.

On this show, I offer career advice, rather than pure job search advice is designed to help you have a long and prosperous career

Do you … Read more about this episode…

Breaking Out


There is a price we pay to have the life and career we want.

Summary

I want to speak with you today about this notion I have of playing big in the world. There is a price that you pay where you try to break out of the box that organizations try placing you in. For example, if you think back to when you were young, you are brought to school, told to sit at the desk, do what you were told, regurgitate a bunch of facts or else… Or else you might not get into a good college.

You did your best and then went to that good college, told to do the same thing or else you wouldn’t get a good job. These threats go on and on and on and never stop.

In breaking the mold at this stage in your life, and living a little differently, in ways that satisfy you and not necessarily “the machine,” you are changing the dynamics. As a result, there is a price that you pay for doing that. The price usually is criticism.

People start telling you that you are doing the wrong thing. In their own way, they’re trying to show you that they care about you and don’t want you to be hurt. But their dream is not your dream and you need to live yours.

A lifetime doesn’t last as long as we would like it to. Trust me. I remember talking to my dad before he passed, he missed things they want to have happen in his life. But there were more things they want to do and feel and experience… But time didn’t permit him to do them. The same is true of all of us.

Criticism is that tax or price we pay for breaking out on the confines of that box that institutions you try to socialize us into. If you are willing to pay that practice and face rejection and criticism, there is a potential for hope,

for change for living the life we want to have. There are no guarantees, just possibility of learning the lessons that you need to so that you can live the life that you’ve always wanted.

Your choice. Whatever is good for you is good for me. I would like to support you with it. If you are interested, reach out to me.. My web address is www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com; schedule some time with me.

I would love to help you play big in the world.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice and encouragement, visit my website, www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Ready to schedule your first coaching call?

The Change It Had To Come – Job Search Radio

 

I learned something a long time ago– you can swim with the flow of the river or swim against it. If you decide to swim against it, the likelihood is that you will drown.

Summary

I want to talk to you older workers for a second about something that I know you know on one level is happening but on other levels you deny how it’s going to affect you and it winds up costing you your career. That is the notion of change. Let me use my career as an example.

When I started recruiting in the 1970s, the hot technology was COBOL. Ultimately, what happens is that things changed “in different technologies became the “hot technology.” Those technologies changed and new things replace them. This is an about the hot technology and what is hot in the market; it is about the need to adapt.

I remember when COBOL was becoming passé and people were starting to use minicomputers, programming languages are completely irrelevant now. They were recruiters who were saying, “there are no COBOL jobs and I have these great COBOL people,” and they didn’t adapt.

If you look at your field, the one that you’re working in now, and the changes that you’ve seen over your proof career or long career, you’ll see that things have changed.

You can argue with them and say to yourself, “I don’t want to have to learn this stuff,” and concede the fact that your career will come to an end because there are people who will want to learn that stuff, who do want to become involved with those things that are new, and desirable. It’s not like you’re going to be the best and that new thing, but you need to get some experience with whatever that thing is that is the new thing in your field.

You need to keep attending conferences. You need to keep paying attention. Reading trade publications, understanding what the change is how to adapt with it, and making the change, as well.

For you, unless you do this, let’s skip ahead a few years. There will be some version of recession. When firms start evaluating who to cut, unless you have adapted, you are an expensive item to. That’s true especially knowing the old stuff.

You always have to learn “new.” You always have to adapt, or else, otherwise, I’m going to start calling you “Dino,” for the dinosaur – – a legacy in your division. An old timer. The person who they tell stories about or jokes about at the office as the person who missed the opportunity to be on the cutting edge. Who missed out and made the decision that cost them their career.

There are so many instances I have seen of people who made this mistake, who hang on for dear life. The truth is if you learn the new stuff,, even if they do cut you (after all, there’s no guarantee that they won’t), you can find another position or contract work during the down times because you know the new stuff and you have experience with the new stuff.

Stay up-to-date with your field. Make sure your current and, if there are so many things that make it hard, to the best! Just don’t get stuck in the mindset that says, “Something else.Ugh,” and started to whine about it. No one likes a whiner, no matter what the subject is. Don’t become the office complainer.

Adapt. Spearhead the change. Encourage other people to adapt as well. You will wind up being a survivor.

On this show, I offer career advice, rather than pure job search advice is designed to help you have a long and prosperous career

Do you … Read more about this episode…

No B. S. Job Search Advice: What’s at Risk?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter invites you to explore what’s at risk for you to change.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at the Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit my website, http://www.TheBigGameHunter.us to sign up for a complimentary subscription to No B.S. Job Search Advice  Ezine, pay what you want for my books and guides to job hunting and watch hundreds of other videos about job hunting and hiring.

Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Listen to Job Search Radio, No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio and No B. S. Hiring Advice Radio in iTunes and other podcast directories and apps.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

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