Why Do Behavioral Interview Questions Work? | No BS Job Search Advice

Ep 693 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why behavioral interview questions work.

Summary

I was asked why behavioral interviews questions work. What is a behavioral interview? I behavioral interview is a type of interview where questions start off, "tell me about a time when you…" You know questions where you are able to tell stories.

Even the toughest question… You can find the answer on the web. I but some of them on my blog, http://blog.thebiggamehunter.us. Use the categories featuring the Bonhomme to pull up tough interview. I have so many of these questions the job hunters don't spend the time practicing.. You don't spend the time learning how to answer these questions. You don't spend the time and review. Just like you don't spend the time practicing how to answer simple questions like, "Tell me about yourself." You just think that you should walk in and when it. That's why employers use this type of question. So many job hunters are just too lazy to take the time to be a champion.

I'm going to use the metaphor of the athlete. When you think a process football team comes out on the field do you think they haven't practiced repeatedly all the same plays for years? Do you think a baseball player hasn't spent time in the batting cage learning how to hit? Do you think they don't practice defense of plays with cutoffs in order to execute them? Yet you think you can go on an interview and just show up.

Do the smart thing. Start learning how to answer these questions. After all, great athletes are paid millions and millions of dollars to practice how to perform. Entertainers, singers, actors and actresses are paid millions of dollars in order to execute on the stage and allow them to be loved by an audience and make their performance credible. And you shop on an interview. Never having rehearsed your lines. Does that make a lot of sense to you?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 632 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a format for answering those trick behavioral questions. 

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the best, most effective way to answer those tricky behavioral interview questions that are asked on job interviews. You can recognize them because what the employer is asking is about how you handled situations in the past. Not what you know, but what you did. The type of situations that you were in and how you handled them.

They are tricky because, so often, because people become modest and understated, or are completely unprepared to answer them. The questions, invariably start off with a scenario.

"Tell me about a time when you…"

"Describe a situation where you…"

Things along those lines. Suddenly, people get this false modesty. They talk about what their group did. They talk about what the manager did. They talk about everyone except using "I" statements. You know, I did this. I did that. I statements.

You don't want to sound boastful but you want to paint a tapestry for them. You want to get the paint on the canvas in a way that describes the situation that you faced. The methodology is called the STAR method.

You describe the situation (that is, the S in star) that you faced and do it with some depth that really paints the picture of the situation that you faced. Then, you start looking at the Task that was ahead of you. Perhaps it was assigned to you; perhaps you looked at the situation and figured out what needed to be done (that is, the "T" in star). The Action that you took. What was the action that you did? Were there any bumps in the road that you had to overcome? It could be difficulties with the user. It could have been colleagues who you had to persuade to get on board with the program. Whatever it was, you talk about the actions that you talk and what the Result was. To me, results are invariably are about outcomes. When I think about outcomes, I think about money saved or money you helped an organization earn. Where that isn't possible, you talk about delivering that fantastic result beyond everyone's expectations that cause you to receive incredible praise.

If you don't really have a situation like that, don't concoct it, but you need to be prepared to talk about situations where you handle the crisis. Perhaps, you need to problem solve in a unique way. Perhaps what you did have a significant financial contribution. Think big picture here.

As you talk about what, again, you can start off, as I always say, with a little bit of theater.

"Wow! That's a great question. There was this time about a year ago when I…" Then you describe the situation that you faced. "My boss asked me to do…" Again, paint the picture of your manager coming to you in describing in detail (or not) what needed to be done. The action that you ultimately took and what the result was of that action, preferably in terms of money saved or money earned for your organization.

Then, if you want to put a cherry on it, talk about what you learned from the situation from the problems that you faced and how you overcame them.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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