Asking For Help With Job Hunting | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks out about the challenges many people have with asking for help in their job search.

NOTE: THE REFERENCE TO SPECIFIC LINKS I MENTION IS NO LONGER VALID

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Our Love-Hate Relationship With Asking for Help (VIDEO)


I conducted an experiment on Facebook about asking for help. What goes on for you?

Summary

I conducted an interesting (it was at least interesting to me into a number of other people) experiment on Facebook over a few day period. It started off with a question, "What is so hard about saying,' I need help to someone who can help you?' I think that's a pretty simple question, but here are some of the responses:

"The ego."
"Pride."
"I'm not sure what the circumstances were that you are referring to but maybe, just maybe, the person was maligned and abused the last time they asked for help."
"I feel like the more help I need the harder it is to ask."
"Even harder for men. My wife is trying to get me to ask for directions when we are lost."
"Maybe those who need us the most want us to just help them.
"Stupidity, plain and simple." Stupidity was my answer
"it exposes the answer I tell myself, true or not, that there is something wrong with me."

I want to go into question number 2 because, obviously, because there is the perception that something is faulty with the person who asks for help that seems to be ingrained in our culture. That's generally what is happening.

People didn't ask for help because of pride, ego, they felt stupid and other reasons that keep them from getting the help that they need.

How do you feel when you ask for help? This is interesting! Among the answers were:

"Fearful, may be desperate."
"Oh, G-d! When I was younger I knew everything I didn't think I needed any help. WRONG! Now that I'm an elder. I know that there are those who are wiser than me and can ask for their help."
"Weak. I should know it all and be able to do it all."
DING DING! DING! DING DING! I think that's the real thing.
"Humble and helpful." There were few of these in there that I thought were interesting.

"What a great question! At the depth I feel vulnerable and incompetent. I think we have this conflict that goes on within us."

I think this summarizes it very well. A woman named Judy said, "it's like I'm not worthy and time inconveniencing someone."

It's as though we screwed up or are defective in some way. We might be rebuked. There are some people who might feel hopeful and that's wonderful but the vast majority don't have that sort of reaction. The result is that many of us live a particular way, frustrated, disappointed.

How do you win? We don't know everything. We don't know what to do all the time. We do make mistakes and screw up. As a result, we don't do things to make it easy for ourselves.

Easy is an interesting word in this context because, obviously, if you're asking for help (judging by the reactions I 1st spoke about – – fearful, scared, defective, stupid), it is not so easy. Shouldn't it just be easy to look at someone and say, "I ask you something for a second?" If they say,, "no, it's not a good time right now," you can always ask what it might be a good time. That's what usually happens, right? Emotionally, we get caught up in this turmoil.

I love you to take a little bit of time to reflect on this for yourself and just think about what the impact is not asking for help and how that has worked for you and not work for you. Worked for you in the way of feeling more capable than you really are. I admit it. I am incompetent at a lot of things, far more than I'd like to admit. But I know I am incompetent at a lot of stuff.

I would love you to consider that once you've admit it is far easier for yourself, it is far easier to receive that help an act without it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

Ready to schedule your first coaching call?

Is It OK To Ask People for Help in Your Job Search? (VIDEO)


The simple answer is easy; the detailed question is more complicated.

 

Summary

Someone asked me the question, "is it okay to ask people for help in your job search?" I have a simple answer but it becomes more complicated when I go into detail.

The simple answer is, "Absolutely!" You have to ask for help. You don't know everyone and you don't know everything. You need to get help.

Let me start with the "know everyone" part of this. If you just answer and that you find online, you're missing the bulk of all positions are available. The statistics show that 70% of all positions are filled. As a result of networking and 70% of those 70% are filled as result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your job search. In other words, people you know introduce you to other people who they know, but you don't. Or the 2nd level connections introduce you to people that they know. As a result, you have to get past your original contacts to get to an individual or a firm that is trying to hire. You have to ask people for help in order to do this.

Let me go to the "advice" definition of the word help. Sometimes, the people that you ask for advice/help are not particularly knowledgeable and, in that respect, it is not is not a good strategy. You see, even if you get to someone who actually is knowledgeable, like a recruiter, they talk about their limited perspective. They answer questions from their self-interest. They tell you about a job that they are representing and how wonderful the firm is that they are representing and how the hiring manager is fabulous… They talk on and on and on saying a bunch of nothing. What are you really learning about this company anyway?

What are you learning about your resume? What are you learning about interviewing? What are you learning about salary negotiation? What are you learning to expand your knowledge in order to get a job? Yes, you are getting an interview through the recruiter, but you are really getting anywhere.

Even when you ask friends, what do they really know anyway? They got a job. Great! Have you ever asked him how many jobs they got turned down for before they got this 1? Or how many resumes they sent out that didn't get results? They found the job by accident.

If you talk to people who hire, they know what they look for when they hire, but they don't know more than that. You are getting a limited perspective. Lord knows, I interviewed enough hiring managers who look for work to know the real story about how poorly they do on most interviews and how frequently they are turned down.

Asking people for advice can become problematical. Much too often because these are the right people to ask.

I'm someone who is filled more than 1200 positions when I worked in recruiting, do executive job search coaching now, I have a lot of great information that I have curated at JobSearchCoachingHQ.com that will help you.

I want to encourage you to get a job search coach like me. Again, my site is JobSearchCoachingHQ.com which has the best of my content that is available to help you with your job search . Plus I answer questions from people.

Asking for help is smart. Asking the right people for help is smartest of all. You can be asking people for help with introductions. In that instance, I would tell people to tell people what you know, what you can do, what you have done as you. Do this do this in a few seconds or less, making sure that they only have a single thought to hang onto.

Tell them what you are looking for, so that in this way, if they hear about something they can point you to it. If they stumble into something, they can refer you.

In terms of advice on the job search, get you an expert. Don't just talk to amateurs and get their advice. Otherwise, the blind is leading the blind and you are not going to get to where you want to.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you are interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us 

No B. S. Job Search Advice: Winners and Everyone Else

There are career winners and then there is everyone else.

This show emerges from the archives that is 1 of my earliest videos.  Although the employment statistics that quote or hold, the core of the show is timeless.

As I look back on it, it is a video that really lays the groundwork for me deciding to become a coach.  A lot of you feel like losers, not simply because you’re out of work or can’t find the job.  You haven’t been able to figure out how to have the career, the business or the life that you want. 

Let me help you. 

 

Summary

As I talk with you today, there are almost 25 million people who are out of work or underemployed.  There are countless millions beyond them who hate their jobs and the test waking up in the morning to go to work.

There are also people who are champions, thoroughbreds… Winners!  These are individuals that the system just loves and were hired throughout this awful economic time that we lived through.  

What’s the difference between them?

How can we help the losers become winners?

How can we turnaround a life, help individuals achieve and make their dreams come true?

That’s what I hope to do with this video – – take people that society considers losers and help them become winners and help them make their dreams come true.  In order to do this, wouldn’t take individuals who could be in their 20s or 30s, male or female… It doesn’t really matter.  We want to help deconstruct them, not just for their skills and help them get better skills.

We want to look at the box that they’ve put themselves into that helps them become a “loser.”  I want to help them break out of that box and help them achieve their dreams.  At the end of the show, I want to help them turnaround on lives, step forward and make great things happen.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Ready to schedule your first coaching call?

Asking for Help With Your Job Search

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks out about the challenges many people have with asking for help in their job search.

———————————————————————————————————

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

 

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