Fired? They Can Find Out. (VIDEO)


Can an employer find out I was fired, not laid off?

Summary

People are invariably worried that they are fired from a job, not laid off, but fired from a job, the next employer is going to find out.

That's true. They can find out.

What happens is that if you sign the form at the time of your application that allows company to check reference or, at the time that you accept their offer if you sign something that allows them to do a background check that includes a reference with a former employer, generally, large firms will release that information. They may say they have a policy against it, but usually in some way, you are at risk of it coming out.

I want to be clear that so far have been talking about large firms. If a small firm is hiring you, the likelihood is that you can provide the references for them to check. It's not like you're going to give the boss as a reference who fired you for incompetence, or you? You can pick up here or someone who is a peer will say they are manager or a legal or whatever to support your candidacy.

Large firms are generally not going to put up with that. They're going to want the okay to contact your former employer. Your only hope there is if your former employer has a policy that says, "We don't release any information."

I recently had something where was coaching someone who is looking for position, having been fired by former boss who, the way he tells the story, just didn't like him or give him a chance. after years of service with the firm, had done a fine job for the company, but they just had out for him. What the truth is, I do not know. At the time he was fired, he was told that they would not say anything adverse about his candidacy. There was a point where he found out that this manager had.

I told him to call up the head of HR and say something to them very simple. The simple statement. I told him to tell them was, "It is come to my attention that your firm has violated an agreement that you made with me. The agreement was not to provide an adverse reference. I know that this is happened. I want to be clear. If it happens again, I will take strong and enforceable action. I'm sure you will not want to have this happen again and will insist that your staff abide by the agreement."

I have another situation where a senior professional was facing an adverse reference. The senior management of his firm promised a good reference. He was coming up and the executive search firm was going to call to do a reference check about his work prior to him meeting with their client. I suggested the call the president of the firm and say, "Hi! I'm just checking in with you to let you know that you will probably be getting a call from someone representing a position that I am up for. I would really appreciate it if you capture agreement and provided a great reference." Which they did.

The point of the stories that I have been telling is that if you have been fired, the goal is to get an agreement out the door that says 1 of the few things.
1. They will provide a great reference and talk about how economic circumstances dictated the dismissal.
2. They state that is an institution, they do not provide references on anyone and they act that way if someone checks a reference.

The latest theory were background checking can become questionable is what dates of employment. What I always tell people is that if you're not sure the date, next to the date on the application, you put the expression, "approx" for "approximately." This signals that you're not absolutely sure of the date.

If you are lying about your dates, that's something that if they check your background, they will find pretty quickly especially if you trying to cover up 6 months here or a year there . . That's really next to impossible to get away with.. I will simply say that you are better off just being forthcoming, rather than shooting yourself in the foot if you worked for so long to get this position.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Can I Tell a Recruiter “No” When They Ask for References? (VIDEO)


Here answer the question from someone who is asked for references by recruiter during the 1st interview and doesn’t want to provide them.

Summary

I was asked the question I thought was great, "A recruiter has asked me for references at the time of the 1st interview. I don't really want to give it to them. How can I say no to a recruiter if they asked me for references during an interview?"

I want to start off by differentiating and start by answering the question about a contingency recruiters. That's definitely a place to say no. They may tell you that they want to check references on behalf of their clients. That's a great line. But what they are really doing is trying to use your contacts to recruit other people. I know this because I listen to sales trainers for years talk about this is a great gambit to get talent and you don't want to be complicit.

The easiest way to respond is to smile and say, "In due time but not right now."

If you respond by saying, "We need to have it because the client wants us to check references at the time that we submit a cabinet," (I want to be clear, not talking about retained search firm's or C suite professionals) I am answering in this way for the Average Jane or Joe who is approached by a recruiter and is being told that the client wants it.

"Great! I'll be happy to provide my references to the client."

"They want us to check the references."

"Not at this time."

"Then we can submit you."

"OK."

Leave it at that. You know why? It's because if they can get you in the door they'll get you in the door.

And they can't. What they're trying to do is parlay one contact into 2 or 3 were they call them up and trying to recruit them, extensively under the guise of checking a reference.

So, they might say, "We need a former manager, it was start by contacting your manager in doing a reference check and then flip it in an effort to get recruiting business from them.

Or they may try to talk to a peer reviewers and then say, "Say! This is a position I am trying to recruit for. Is this something that might interest you? There are a lot of little gambits that go on with third-party recruiters.

I know there are a lot of people who might respond by saying, "Would you do that with a company?"

"NO!" Unfortunately, too many third-party recruiters or sleazy. We know this already. The idea is to push them off because you don't know if you can trust them yet (wink wink. Probably you can trust many of them anyway. There are exceptions, but most of them you probably can't.) And it's kind of like being on a 1st date with someone.

"Can I get a reference from your former husband or wife, please. I would like to get a reference from them. Maybe someone else you went out with previously because I want to know what you are liked by talking to them."

No, not on a 1st date, especially with an absolute stranger. Obviously, you would never do that in a dating situation! Here, I want you to do this very casually and with a big smile on your face, say, "In due time , we'll get that."

"But the client wants it!"

"If you can't present me with out that, obviously you don't think I am a fit. So let's leave it at that and just move on."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes  

The New Background Check | Job Search Radio

 

EP 306 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the new way firms check you out.

Summary

You know it, you've read it, you've heard it many times.

The warning I'm giving you is to watch your social media presence. I had someone last week who is going on 1/3 interview. The client called me up and said, "Were going to cancel the interview."

"What happened?"

They had done on Twitter and saw something stupid he wrote there. If for one thing, they would've let it slide.. But they saw whole bunch of stuff they gave them cause for pause.

I'm reminding you that a lot of people have gotten warned about Facebook. LinkedIn is pristine for most people. Twitter is a place where people get sloppy sometimes.

Don't say stupid stuff. It comes back and haunts people. It's like the new reference check is going to twitter or going to Facebook and see what you have written there.

This guy lost an opportunity he really wanted and I have to explain to him. I'm going to tell him to purge his twitter feed.

When all is said and done, you can't do stupid stuff because there's an audit trail for you in everything that you do these days that you create. You don't want to put yourself in that position were something you wrote comes back and haunt you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Do I Do If I Have Lost Contact With Past Employers and References? (VIDEO)


The original question (which I share) was actually the wrong question. Here answer the right question and try to help someone take action.

Summary

The original question I received is, "If you've lost touch with employers and past references, is there still hope for you as a job seeker?"

As you can see, I changed the question to, "What do I do if I lost contact with past employers and references?"

However, what is most revealing is the actual question.

"All is lost."

"I am doomed."

Stop it. Seriously, stop it. You've got a brain. Pause for a second and say, "if I were to try and find my best friend who I haven't spoken with in 5 years, what what I do?" The answer is you would look for them on Facebook. You would look for them on LinkedIn. You will go online. Why is this any different?

The fact of the matter is that it isn't any different. In order to reestablish contact with people that you haven't been in contact with for a while, you start by asking yourself, "Where did they tell me they lived, again?" Then you would do a Google search.

"Where did we work together?" Then he went to a LinkedIn search and look for them by name and "Current or Past Employers," and obviously this would be a past employer. You can always do a Facebook search and see if you can connect with them and then drop them a quick note and say, "I'm so sorry that I have been out of the loop for a while. I wanted to reach back out to you. Do you have a few minutes to speak? How can I get a hold of you?"

Just make the contact!. You may feel uncomfortable doing it. Get over it! They are human being who may need you at some point, right?

Be flexible. Be friendly. Acknowledge that you would like to do it differently in the future. Reach out to them using online tools. You will find them. It's not that hard.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How Do I Get a New Job When My Manager is Giving Bad Reference? (VIDEO)

A job hunter who is learning  that references matter asks what s/he can do When his manager is getting a bad reference.

bad-reference

 

Summary

The question for today is, “How do I get a new job. When my manager is giving up that references about me?”

Before I answer the question, I want you to learn a lesson- -Don’t put yourself in that position. You discovered how difficult it is to find work when the best person to evaluate you is not in your corner.  They are not your ally.

Whether the issue is around bad behavior in the office, whether the issue is around poor performance or excessive lateness is, this all comes back to bite you in the butt.  This person is not an ally or willing to lie for you, they are not going to stick to a story.  You are going to need to find someone else to do it for you.  Maybe a former coworker will (the key word in that is former); maybe a former manager — someone who predates your current manager who can attest to your work.

Let’s assume that you were fired for poor performance.  Why would your firm give out a good reference?  After all, they fired you because you did a bad job. Understand that firms will comply with one another about confirming dates of employment.  They’re not going to lie about things related to your work with them.

You can go to HR (and I think this would be the smart move) and ask whether the firm has a policy against providing references because, frankly, “Mine will be poor and I don’t want to be in a position where I have to sue because the impact of the reference your firm provides is going to keep me from finding work. I don’t believe I should be punished for the rest of my life for mistakes I made. I’m sure you don’t want to deal with litigation. What I would like to have everyone cautioned about is that it is not company policy to give references out we can confirm dates of employment.”  That can get you off the hook.

You still need to get people who will talk about you and say that they are a former colleague, former manager… Stuff along those lines… And talk positively about you.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Checking References That Were Not Provided


Is it normal and ethical for a potential employer to contact my ex-coworkers to ask about my work even though they are not the references that I had provided?

 

Summary

This is a question I received about checking references that were not provided.

Is it normal and ethical for an employer to check the reference with my ex-coworkers, even though they are not the references I provided?

Understand, most employers know that the reference you gave them is “canned.”  If you give them a bad one, you are a moron.  They or assuming you are not a moron so they want to get something real.  So who should they call?  They might call someone they already know who works in the organization to check your reference.

For example, there was this 1 consulting firm that I did work with for years.  They did business development and consulting work with organizations worldwide for many years.  If this was affirmed. There was no longer client and they were interviewing someone from this firm, they might contact someone that they already knew and ask if they knew the person and what they thought.

If they heard something critical or something. He gave them, “cause for pause,” they might dig a little deeper before hiring the person. If they heard something positive, that was the reference and they brought someone on board. This was someone that they knew and trusted.

If they are doing what is nicknamed, “secondary sourcing (asking your reference. If there is someone else that they know who can attest or comment about your work),” that is considered smart because speaking to your primary reference is never going to go anywhere beyond a prepared answer from the reference and will get something unrehearsed from the secondary individual that is much closer to the truth.

I can debate the use of the term, “ethical.”  Who decides ethics?  What is unethical about what they are doing?

But I didn’t give the reference to them?

I am not aware of any ethics organization that will consider that a violation.

Is it normal?  No!  Employers, like people, are lazy.  They often take the path of least resistance.

Is it smart?  You bet it is!  What they are able to do is find out more of the truth that you will ever give them, then the references will never give them, so there are no surprises.

These people can also be a tiebreaker when there are references that might be lukewarm.

I also want to remind you that if an adverse reference result in you not being hired, you are entitled to, a copy of a receive a report under the Fair Credit Reporting Act of the references so that you can respond to the allegations or statements that were made. That will be sent to the employer.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Stay in Contact With My References During a Long Job Search? – Job Search Radio

If you do with the right way, you will establish your references at the beginning of the job search so you know who they are and what they will say and can include them in an application when you fill one out. But, often, a lot of time goes by from the time that you first speak with them until the time that you need them. How do you stay in contact? How do you keep them on their toes so they are ready when you need them?

 
Summary

How do you stay in contact with the references when you know you to be involved with a lengthy job search?

So much of this question reveals a lack of confidence on the part of the job hunter. First of all, I don’t know how long a “long job search” is. Let’s assume this person knows it will be a long job search because they realize that they are a beginner or they have antiquated skills or experience that will cause it to be a long job search.

First of all, you need to accept the fact that you will need to do work in order to make this not a long job search. By that, I mean that there are things you will need to learn or relearn that the job market demands of you that will improve your chances, instead of being like a feather in the wind blowing from place to place. You take charge of your own career and learn what you need to learn. That’s step number one

Step number two is how do you stay in contact with people? You stay in contact are limited basis but not an abusive basis. For example, you write what seems like a personal note. Instead of doing a bulk copy or blind copy to five people who might be references, and send it to one person at a time.

The subject line could be something like, “Status update.” The message could read, “I’m not at a point yet where my interviews will yield an offer, but I want to let you know that I’m still looking, keep this in your mind.” Then remind them of the few points you want them to make at the right time so it just doesn’t hit the like a ton of bricks.

Continue by saying, “Have no fear. When I need you I will contact you immediately and say,” ‘It’s time.'” That will give them the habit of knowing that that is the code phrase for, “I really need you.”

Doing it every 4 to 6 weeks is fine, just to send a quick report on your job search and where you are. You don’t have to mention companies by name. You just want them to know that she was still looking for a position and you’ll be in contact when you need them.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.= http://www.JobSa

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Why Don’t Employers Ask for Letters of Recommendation?


To me, there are good reasons why employers don’t want to read a letter of recommendation. However, I offer a suggestion for how you could create one that could be a very powerful advocate on your behalf.

Summary

Why don’t employers ask for a letter of recommendation? Good question, generally asked by a less experienced person rather than a more experienced person. Usually, it is asked by a recent grad or someone new to their career.

Let me answer the question directly. If you are handed a letter of recommendation by someone, how would you know if it was truthful? Seriously, how would you know? Why couldn’t this be the candidate’s best friend writing up a letter and pretending to be a former employer or former coworker?

The answer is there is no way to prove it truthful and it is easy to prove fraud. After all employers can simply go to LinkedIn, do Google searches, see things and where they intersect and decide for themselves whether to pay attention to the “reference.”

Letters of recommendation have the potential for fraud and, thus, seemed valueless to employers. You can offer them, if you like, and may even say, “Sure, I will be happy to have one” and never look at it again. They may take a quick glance at it in the interview I know from my own experience that when I receive one email to me, I don’t care.

After all, what is this person going to say? That the person was awful? Will they ever say it was the worst hire they ever made? No because this is a letter of recommendation and, by definition the person who is being represented is being recommended. Why read it? What’s special about it?

However, if you gave a video of someone and it was real, it was someone who could be substantiated as a former manager or co-worker (preferably the former manager), that’s different.
That’s similar to what Internet marketers do when they have video testimonials from people on their website talking about the successes people have had using their products and/or services.

So, in general, visible letter of recommendation is a waste of time. Having a resume that provides a hyperlink to a video testimonial has a possibility of having a good effect on your candidacy. Even then, if someone goes to their LinkedIn profile and see corroboration that the two of you might have worked with the same company in roles where you work with have intersected, if the testimonial is not the same usual pablum but would have someone saying something like, “my name is Jeff and I worked with (fill in the blank) and let me tell you what it was like working with them,” that can be a powerful marketing tool on your behalf.

Video is different in how it affects someone than reading something. That’s why I can work to your advantage

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

How Do I Stay I Contact With My References During A Long Job Search

 

Q. References are important. How do you stay in contact with them?

Summary

So the question is, “My job search is going to be a long one. How do I stay in contact with my references?”

This is an interesting question. So much of it reveals a lack of confidence on the part of the job hunter.

Now we don’t know what a long job search is to this job hunter but let’s accept this on face value. They know is going to be a long job search because they are a beginner or perhaps have antiquated skills that make them less marketable.

So first of all you’re going to need to do work to prevent this from being a long job search. There are skills you will need to learn or relearn in order to avoid it from taking as long as you fear. After all, you don’t want to be like a feather in the wind blowing from place to place. You want to be someone who is desirable marketable and is in command of your situation.

The next step is to stay in contact with your references on a limited basis, not an abusive basis. You write what seems to be a personal note instead of a BCC or bulk copy to a lot of people. Instead, copy and paste an individual message to individual people. It can be the same message but give the illusion that it is a personal individual message.

The subject line can read something like, “status update.”

The body of the message could read something like, “I’m not at a point in my search where I feel like I’m close to anything. I thought I would just ask you to keep this in your mind and if you hear about something that makes sense for me, reach out and let me know about it or give the recruiter my contact information to reach out to me directly.”

Send a note to them every 4 to 6 weeks – – that’s fine. You have to mention who your interviewing with of the number of firms you spoken with unless, of course, the person you’re writing to has contacts there or is a former employee.

Tell them you’re not at the point where you think you’re getting an offer but just wanted to stay in touch with them so that in case they do their of something they should feel free to reach out to you

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Should I Ask My Boss For a Reference?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a viewer who wants to know whether he should ask his current boss for a reference given that he has worked for the same firm for 10 years.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Have a question you want me to answer? Contact me through PrestoExperts

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