9 Steps to Getting Ready for Your Next Interview

We used to host dinner parties in our apartment in Greenwich Village. Our place had two story windows with a view of the midtown Manhattan skyline both in the apartment and in our roof garden. People would come and enjoy the company, the views and would LOVE the food.

Evenings would start with cocktails and hors d’oeurves before we sat for dinners that lasted hours. Everything was served with an eye to detail that included how each dish was plated. People begged for invitations.

Like preparing a great meal, interviewing requires preparation. You buy good ingredients and give yourself time. Taking the time to prepare for an interview will give you a huge leg up on your competition.

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Here’s how to get ready for your next job interview:

1.   Schedule interviews at times that work for your metabolism. Are you a morning person? Why would you accept a 6PM interview? If you are a person who functions best in the afternoon, try not to accept early morning appointments. If you are a person who needs to be conscious of their blood sugar, try to schedule your appointments at times when you are at your peak. If forced to accept one of your less ideal times, have a quick bite prior to the interview to avoid “fading.” Avoid overeating.

2.   Give yourself extra time to get to their offices. There are few things worse than getting to an interview late.  Arrive at the office building 7-10 minutes early. If it is summer, you want to wait in the lobby to cool off; no one likes shaking sweaty hands. If it’s winter, warm up; you don’t want someone’s early impressions of you formed by shaking a cold hand. Take a few minutes in the lobby to get focused on what you will say. Allow time to get through building security so that you actually arrive at your interview on time and ready to go.

3.   Properly introduce yourself to everyone you meet by saying. “My name is __________ and I have a [1:30] interview with ________________.”

4.   If you are asked if they can hang your coat, accept the offer; if offered a beverage, accept a beverage. You don’t have to drink coffee or tea. Soda, bottled water or water is fine. Thank whoever helps you. Declining the offer may be rude in some cultures.

5.   Take your seat in order to face the greatest number of entry points into the room so that you can see someone approaching you. Being startled is not a good way to start a meeting.

6.   If you are given an application, complete it and complete it thoroughly, accurately and neatly. Do not attach your resume and write, “See attached resume.” An application is a legal document and failure to complete it accurately can be grounds for termination.  If you are not sure about the month you started a job or your exact salary, write “approx” (for the word approximately) next to the item. If asked, indicate you are not absolutely certain of the exact month and don’t wish to deceive anyone. Obviously, if you can ascertain your salary or starting date prior to interviewing, do so; for some people, the date or salary may be so far in the past to make it impossible to determine.

7.   Write legibly (or as legibly as you can). This may be the twelfth application you’ve completed, but it is the first of yours that they’ve seen. In many professions, sloppiness is seen as a flaw.

8. When you hear your name announced, stand, and smile, shake the hand of your interviewer and immediately size them up as a person. Are they smart (or not). Aggressive (or not). If you were meeting this person socially, I’m sure your instincts would be right. Unfortunately, because people think interviews are important, they think they have to feel the interviewer out. Doing that is a mistake. Hard and fast impressions of you will be formed during the next ten minutes that will be difficult to change. If you tend to be right in social situations about the people you meet, trust your instincts in professional ones, too.

9. I have a video on YouTube called What Is The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview. Watch it before you go to your meeting. I am confident you will find it is a good decision.

Using these nine steps as a check list will get you started better than your competition. What you do after that is up to you.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017    

 

If you liked this article, read, “4 Steps to Getting Better Results With Your Resume (Lose 25 Pounds, Grow Hair and Lose 3 Inches Off Your Waist).

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game HunterJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Job Interview Preparation (VIDEO)

 

From the archives. Disregard the info about where to get the book that this is drawn from.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with easy to use suggestions for how to prepare for your next interview and the questions you are asked.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about interview preparation. This video is derived from my book, "The Single Best Question You Should Ask On Any Interview." Is available on Amazon for Kindle. However, you can read it and all of my other books if you join JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.

Before you go to an interview. Most people know to do some basic research about the firm if you've never heard of them before. Even if you have heard of them before, what about some of the basic challenges the firm has right now.

You need to talk about what you've done and how you went about doing it. Think in terms of the format. The format starts off with a task, you were given to work on. You might say, " I was asked to work on this what it's, or this system, or this engineering project."

Explain to them what you stepped into. Identify the problem you were given and what resources you had available. That could be dollars, people, time, technology… Whatever it is, to find the resources you had to work with.

Then, talk about the outcomes , whether you help them make money, save money, how much was involved. It's certainly a lot more impressive when you're able to say, "my work helped to generate 3 1/2 million dollars in additional sales," or "I drove costs by $2.4 million." Or $213,000.

Once you can describe it in a real way, firms can contextualize what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. Ultimately, what you are going to be hired to do is make your boss look good.

Catch that one again.

You are hired because your boss thinks you are going to help make them look good.

How will they look good?

Real simple. You help the firm make money or you help the firm save money. That's kind of like a parent when they look at a child and think, "that's my girl!" Or "that's my boy!"

They are able to claim credit for your work. They hired you, and that helps them look good.

Spend some time preparing for your interview, otherwise you walk in and you "wing it," and frankly, there are very few people who can pull that off successfully very often.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Three Job Search Questions to Ask Yourself (VIDEO)

It is a lot easier to drive from Dallas to Montreal with a map, design a system with with written specifications, or play a game knowing its rules, right?

NOTE: instead of visiting the site. I mentioned in the podcast, visit JobSearchCoachingHQ.com

Summary

I'm going to ask you a series of questions that I believe will be helpful to you in framing your job search. I'm sure you'll have an answer to the 1st one. Most people I speak with don't have a clue about the 2nd or 3rd ones.

"What do you want to achieve in your career? What are your goals? Where are you trying to get to professionally? At the end of all this work that you are going to be doing, what's the outcome that you want to get you?"

Most people I talk to will give me a plausible answer, but when I test them a little bit further with the next question…

"Do you know what you need to know, like, what the steps are, to move from where you are now, to get there," they start to fumble a little bit. They start to wing it because they haven't really stopped to think about it.

Here's the 3rd one . . . "What's the plan? How are you going to get there from here? What are you going to do? What kind of work are you going to do? What kind of training are you going to need? Who is your mentor? What kind of departments will you need to work for? What kind of training/objectives Reagan need to have in order to accomplish it?" . That's where everything breaks down for almost everyone. That's because their objective is really to get a promotion at a place and work their way up the ladder and change jobs every once in a while and lead a relatively mundane existence.

If you are looking for more professionally, I want you to go to my website

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Pre-Interview Research | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses several ways to do pre-interview research so that you are well prepared for your interview.

Summary

Let's talk today about a different way to do research then where you been, probably doing ... Or different places, I should say.

Most of you, when you are doing your homework, you may go to a company's website, look around a little bit, it is kind of chaotic background checking, you've read some stuff on the site, you scan some things, you think you are done. Some of you may go the extra step of going on LinkedIn, seeing if you can find the profile of the person you are going to be meeting with. That can be difficult if your network is small. For me, it is pretty easy at this point because I have so many connections. My suggestion would be that if you do a Google search, site://www.linkedin.com and in quotation marks, put the person's name that may give you a shot if your network is small.

There are a few other places to do some research:
1. YouTube 

The firm you may be interview with might have some videos on YouTube. That may be even easier than searching the website.

2. Facebook. The company page on Facebook may be helpful to you.

3. The twitter feed for the person you would be meeting with may be extremely helpful to get an idea of what the thinking is like, the way they present themselves, you may see a photo of them there is all the more casual than what you see on LinkedIn… All this will give you more's rounded sense of them and their personality than you might underling to engage.

All in all, your job is to do some homework before the interview. So when they say, "So, what do you know about us," and not just simply sitting there going, "I don't know. Uh, I read some stuff. You are a good company." You don't want to come across in that way.

You want to come across as knowledgeable, competent, and present yourself with confidence because, to a real degree, what they are trying to do is get under your vernier, underneath the surface of you to see if there is something more there than the way you are packaging yourself.

One of the ways of deflecting that is to let them know that you are thorough. It is 1 of the most important things that a firm can learn about you is your thoroughness in preparation.

Again, research doesn't have to be hard, difficult, complicated, or take a long time. You can watch 3 videos on YouTube that a firm prepares, find the twitter feed for the person that you're interviewing with, read their company page on Facebook, go to the website, do a Google search… You can do a lot of things in 30 minutes and gotten far further along than you might have previously.

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Getting Ready for a Cold Weather Interview (VIDEO)

Watch the video

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers several simple tips to help you prepare for a cold weather or nasty weather interview.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn 

Preparing for an Interview for Executives, C Suite, Directors, Managers

 

You folks are normally not asked a lot of the dumb questions your staff is asked. Good. How do you prepare?

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Five Things to Ask Yourself

There are few things more frustrating for a headhunter than asking a person basic questions that revolve around what you as a job hunter are looking for in a job and being given uncertain answers. I’m not talking about salary; that’s a question where a wise person states a target objective and is flexible enough to let the market decide the value.
I’m speaking about these basic questions:

1. What is your current compensation? The three wrong answers are: (1) A lie. (A lie will be found out generally after you’re hired. You know what happens then? While you’re out to lunch or have gone home one day, your ability to log in will be terminated and security will be waiting for you at your desk with your personal items packed. You will be escorted from the premises). (2) I won’t tell you. (This reveals that your salary is much lower than the amount you advertise and that you are seeking a big bump). (3) Do you really need to know that? (Yes, I do because my client will want to know. They will ask it on their form. Many companies will terminate an interview for refusing to answer.)

2. Geographically, what’s acceptable to you? Some people are willing to drive more than others. Some people must follow mass transit routes. Some people are willing to relocate at a company’s expense or are willing to relocate on their own for the right opportunity. Think about it.

3. What’s not working for you that is prompting you to want to look for another job? Most of the time, money is not the only factor. Be prepared to discuss your reasons maturely. An immature answer would be, “I hate my job,” or “My boss is an idiot.” Instead, try this one – “I would like to leave consulting and move to industry so that I can avoid the heavy travel that is keeping me away from my family so often.”

4. What are you looking for in a new position? Nine times out of ten, people don’t think of this when they speak to me. What am I supposed to do? Guess? “I’ll know it when I see it” isn’t helpful either.

5. What was the corporate culture like that you were working in? Did you like it? What did you like about it? What didn’t you care for? Let me know if I should replicate your current work environment in your next firm with more money and more interesting work … or not!

Take some time before posting your resume to decide what is important to you and you will find that your interviews will be better  …  and so will your results!

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

 

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Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

 

 

Six Steps to Take When Preparing for a Job Change

Although the government may say a recession is over, more layoffs will inevitably occur. In addition, with the economy improving, people will find themselves less willing to accept the long hours, wage increase suspensions and other requirements of bad times. With more firms adding to staff, wages will start to increase and you will have more of an opportunity to land a better job.

 

If you are worried about being laid off or just think you might want to explore other alternatives your best course of action is to be prepared.

Here are a few things you can do to get ready.

1. If you haven’t already done so, track your accomplishments so that updating your resume is easy. Every three months, sit down with yourself as though you were going into a performance review and record your accomplishments during the previous three months.

2. Update your resume. If you regularly track your accomplishments, updating your resume will be easy. If you don’t, then take the time to document your role, responsibilities and accomplishments. If you employ technology, indicate it in the body of the resume, not just in a summary section.(I know of no one that reads Summaries on resumes, waste of space because they are not connected to a specific project) A position review from HR and previous performance reviews may help you put it together.

3. If you don’t know where they are, track down your references. Managers who will provide strong testimonials about you, your character and your work ethic are worth their weight in gold. Do not let the trail go stale. Stay in contact with them so that when they are needed you know how to find them. Barring that, contact your references and update their contact information (Name, company, title, phone number, e-mail address). Ask them if they would give you a strong reference.

4. Check the job boards to get a pulse for wage scales for what you do. Job boards are a great source of the language and key attributes that employers are looking for.

5. Tailor your resume for each position you apply for. Like the broken watch that is right twice a day, a generic resume will reflect what an employer is looking for from time to time. A tailored resume will do it every time. Get an e-mail account from Yahoo, Hotmail or Gmail for your search. Use this address in case you are laid off prior to finding a new position or to insure that you can disappear from recruiter data bases after you find a new one. The account should read, yourname@gmail.com

6. If you’re laid off, get letters of recommendation and try to negotiate both outplacement and a lengthy severance. Outplacement will provide you with an office to work from while you search plus the services of a support staff to assist you.

By taking time to organize yourself, you will find that your search will get off to a strong start.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2008, 2016

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

Are You The Target?

If an earthquake had devastated your home, would you sit and complain about it or would you be making new plans?

Too often the first thing people do when their firm is experiencing problems is to sit and mope, complain, do anything other than fight for their jobs or hit the exits. Complaining does nothing. Action does.

If you learn your firm is experiencing financial problems severe enough to put layoffs in the cards or your job in jeopardy here are a few things to do:

If you run a business unit or a company and the numbers disappoint, don’t just take it; make your case to the board, to the president, to anyone who should hear it. Don’t let the numbers stand unchallenged. Make sure people know that it is not unique to your firm and that you have a plan to change things.

If you’re the Average Joe or Josephine, be the “backbone of the organization.” Come in early and leave late. Care about what you do and document everything. Make sure people know how much effort you put in without seeming like a martyr.

If you’re fairly new to the firm when problems occur, become “the eager beaver” by becoming a sponge for knowledge. Ask lots of questions and get advice from everyone important. DO IT NOW!!

If you’re an “old timer” become a work machine. Let everyone see you as important so that they don’t believe that you and your high salary are dispensable.

While all of this is going on, prepare your resume.  Start connecting with people inside of your organization.  See if you can transfer to a division where layoffs are unlikely or outside of your organization so that you can start interviewing before you are fired.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2018, 2016

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

An Interview Preparation Tip

 

In this periscope video, I offer a simple way to prepare for the standard interview and the behavioral job interview.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

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