The Inevitable Will Happen When You Start Your New Job | Job Search Radio

I was talking with a friend of mine who started a new job when he faced his version of “the inevitable” when he joined.

Summary

Yesterday, I was talking with a friend of mine who just started a new job. He called me at the end of his 3rd day. He said, "The inevitable happened."

I said, "what did they tell you about?"

He told me this story about how a group manager from another department (it's a small firm; I don't want to make it seem like were talking about a major employer, although it can happen at one, too), met with him. He's starting a new job than what he has done before and he's learning and working for a new organization with different ways of things being done… All the obvious stuff.

She said to him, "When the receptionist is out, we kind of organize amongst ourselves what we call, 'ding duty.'"

He says, "Ding, duty," I think it will be something gross and smelly.

"Yes, we have a bell out front. We each take rotations as to who is going to cover the bell if she is out."

So this became the thing that they forgot to tell him about on the way in. '"

As a new employee at a place, everyone is putting on a good performance of the good face. You're trying to show your self in the best light, and neglected to mention certain things and so are they.

When you join, you will inevitably discover that there are things that they haven't told you about. You will say to yourself, "oh," just like my friend did when he was spoken about "ding duty.."

I'll simply say, be prepared. Something inevitably will be different than what you are led to believe. Maybe what will happen, and these are always the extreme situations, the person who hired you won't be there. Why? Because they quit or were fired during the period before you joined. Maybe that person or that function that you are brought on to do has been changed because there is been a reorg. Whatever it is, be prepared in your own mind that that smooth flow that they talk with you about, all that wonderful happy stuff that they explained isn't going to necessarily be quite that perfect.

​Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Facing the End of the Honeymoon | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses that time after you join a company where you wake up and realize that the honeymoon is over.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about the end of the honeymoon.  Those of us who are or have been married understand that there is a glow period after you get married.  Everything about this person is perfect. They are wonderful.  It isn’t like you fall out of love. But things change.  So it is with your new job.

You join an organization and everything is going to be perfect.  Everything is going to be wonderful.  Nothing could ever go wrong.  There are things that you have been promised that are absolutely terrific.  You have a bright future.  Then one day things start to change.

A decision is made that you don’t agree with.  A coworker says something that seems a little snippy.  Whatever it is, things start to change as the relationship with you, your work, your manager, your organization starts to shift as well.

It doesn’t mean the job is bad.  It doesn’t mean that you should immediately go out and change jobs.  By any stretch of the imagination. That is the wrong approach to take.  It is just that the relationship is changed.  The environment is becoming more apparent to you.  Maybe it will become time to change. But, initially, all it is is a change.

It’s like in a marriage, things ripen. Sometimes they break.  Sometimes they ripen beautifully. Sometimes they sell.  Marriages end in divorce.  Jobs in the divorce.

Your goal is to try to make it work.  Your goal is to see whether it is just a change or something pivotal.

I don’t presume to know what those pivotal things should be for you.  I’d could list a few. But I don’t want to sour your thinking in any way.  You’ll know what it is time to go because you have the case that brought you to this firm. One day you woke up, realize this wasn’t the right place for you and decided it was time to move on.

If you or someone who’s been one organization for a long period of time. There is a pattern that I want to bring to your attention as well.. For those of you who have been with the firm for a long time. The next job tends to be of much shorter duration.  Often, under a year.  That’s because you have unrealistic expectations of what the firm will do for you.  What this firm will do for you will be different than what your previous firm did for you.

That’s not their fault.  That’s you and having unrealistic expectations.  Be patient.  Be patient with them and be patient with yourself.

Rome was not built in a day. Positive change and synthesis and marriages are not built in a day.

Again, one day you’ll wake up in your new job and will feel the same as it did when you 1st started there.  You will feel concerned about that.  Yet, most of the time, there was nothing to be concerned about.  It is just that the relationship has changed.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Facing the End of the Honeymoon

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses that time after you join a company where you wake up and realize that the honeymoon is over.

———————————————————————————————————

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

%d bloggers like this: