Get Publicity for Yourself | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses presenting yourself as an expert and the service that will help you do so.

Summary

A lot of people think publicity.. That's not in my league. There's nothing I can really do to interesting newspaper, reporter or magazine in me. In point of fact, you're wrong. Let me show you how to find out.

There is a service available called, Help-a-Reporter-Out, that you can find at helperreporter.com.

This was started years ago by on man named Peter Shankman as a way of providing an email list 2 people about stories that reporters were working on that they needed help with. He since has sold the list and it is now being managed by different firm. The concept is still the same.

You sign up. 3 times a day you get an email from them. Most of the topics available are not going to be appropriate for you. There will be ones that are. I have appeared on many different sites and in many newspapers as a result of responded to questions the reporters have had about job hunting or hiring. That's my area of expertise, quite obviously.

You have yours. If you start thinking, "I'm a mortgage broker. What are they going to care about?" Let me tell you a lot of these things are going to relate to you. You can also segment the list so you are getting only topics that are appropriate for you.

Again, go to helpareporter.com, fill out the questionnaire, start subscribing. Responding to most of these inquiries when you do... 5, maybe 10 minutes. You can take 5 or 10 minutes to create publicity for yourself that will help you not just simply in this job search, but positioning yourself as an expert for years to come.

You'll wind up in recruiter searches because they are all looking at Google and other search engines for ways of identifying people who are thought leaders. Start working with helpareporter.com and get yourself out there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Pitching and Other Stories | Job Search Radio


Pitching isn’t just in baseball; it occurs in a lot of places in our lives, including job hunting. My guest, John Livesay, and I discuss how to pitch effectively throughout your job search… Without throwing a curveball or screwball at people. We then go into a second topic I think you’ll find interesting as John shares a story about how he was rehired by a former employer.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Know Like Trust and . . . (VIDEO)


A less than 2 minute video about the missing ingredient in most people’s marketing. I apologize for the audio. I forgot to move the mike in front of me.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Connect with me on LinkedIn; <a href="http://
www.linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter” >www.linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website., <a href="http://
www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com” >www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Ready to schedule your first coaching call? https://gum.co/JAcoaching

Always Be on the Prowl. Always be Look for a Job. | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of being in continual job search mode instead of lurching from one job search to another.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about something that really annoys me.  It should annoy you, too.

I have worked with people day in and day out for years who make a critical mistake with their careers.  That mistake is treating their careers as though they can lurch from looking for a job  in one year and then 3 years later looking for another job and not having done anything in the middle.

This may sound goofy to you but for me out.  It would be so much easier for folks if they treated their careers as having value and did things between cycles of changing jobs to prepare for that job change.

I remember in 2007 being home one day and listening to CNN use the term “subprime mortgage” heavily that day as the crisis started to unfold. I start toward people that they need to put their networks in place proactively because we were going to learn a lot more about subprime mortgages over the next 12 to 24 months.  I was more right than I could’ve imagined.

The people go out and start building networks.  At that time?   No.  Did I start to do things along those lines?  Yes, but not as much as I could have.  I tried though because I understood that things were going to change and I need to have a network in place to help me ride through what I knew would be a tough time.  Not as tough as it turned out, but still a very tough time.

You need to not lurch from one job change to another  and say,  “oh my God! I have to build the network!” You need to be working on your brand and ongoing network consistently So that people are thinking of you, so that recruiters are reaching out to you, so that you are seen as a subject matter expert all the time, not every 3 years, not every job change or However long that may wind up being, but all the time so that you are a go to person in your field.

I don’t care what the field is.  You can make all the excuses in the world,, but there are people who are seen as experts in  low level jobs who firms will reach out to because they learn something about that person you can be doing that for your self..  And, because no one is ever going to look out for you is much as you do, you need to spend as much time looking out for yourself.  As the board of your big company does when it looks out for its firms, financial interests.

Think of yourself as being the chairman of the board of your organization.  Think of yourself  as having board members reporting into you; those Board members  are your family.Do you want them to worry? Do you want them to have  concern about the viability of your enterprise .  If the economy suddenly go south?  Of course, not.

You want to constantly be doing things to position yourself so that if you want to leave a firm  that you are working for or transfer internally, people are dying to try to hire you.

I was speaking with someone yesterday who works for a large technology firm.  He had a successful track record with that firm until one day the firm hired someone that he did not describe in favorable terms.  Other departments within the organization clamored to get him.   He chose an option only to have it taken over by the person he didn’t have a lot of affection for when his hiring manager left for another opportunity.

He now has to go outside of his firm  in order to advance.  People know him.   Vendors to his firm are starting to clamber to hire him because they hold in high regard.

You should be in a position like he is where firms want to hire you because they know you.  Put yourself in a position to be found, not just simply  whenever you’re changing jobs but all the time.   Get active..  Get involved with groups locally for your field.  Get involved with the Chamber of Commerce.  Do stuff.  Just get yourself out there.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What Are You Selling?

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My father and mother were born in Poland, met in Siberia and emigrated to the United States after World War II. My Dad was a bookkeeper for a firm that he eventually bought from the founder’s son who was in the process of running it into the ground.

I worked for him as a teenager doing filing and proofing columns. I was not made for such work. It bored me into having blisters in my brain (metaphorical blisters).

One day as we got into his car to drive home, he looked at me and said, “Jeffrey (he always called me “Jeffrey), you can work with your hands or with your head.” I interpreted this father-son moment as meaning, you know nothing about working with your hands. Start focusing on my head.

The term, “knowledge worker” describes a lot of what my father meant. Many of you, like me, sell our knowledge of how something is done, should be done or can be done to employers who pay is for that work. But what happens in an age where such knowledge is readily available and the cost of obtaining that knowledge is declining because of its ready availability?

Using the example of manufacturing, it seems like when certain knowledge or experience is “commoditized,” technology has made it easy for the work to be sent abroad. Even adding the cost of shipping to the manufacturing cost allows firms to earn more than if the job remains in a higher cost market. We have seen the same occurring in what were once called “white collar jobs,” but can be thought of as “knowledge work.”

For most of us who are selling knowledge and experience, what are you actually selling to an employer that they should buy?

Continued

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” Connect with me on LinkedIn and message me if you want to buy a PDF.

How Do I Find a Job Without a Resume?


I was asked this question on Quora and thought to be a good way to encourage you to think creatively.

Summary

The question I was asked was, “How do you find a job without a resume?” I think the answer comes down to two ways.

If you are very inexperienced and looking for a job, let’s say, in retail or a job at a fast food restaurant, you don’t need a resume. They may ask you to complete an application but the idea of a formal resume is not important.

However, if you are in a professional discipline, how do you find the job without a resume? The answer comes down to, “Why would employer want to talk to you without you following the convention of you submitting your resume?”

I think the answer is clear. They had a particular need and you have the experience they are looking for. How do they know that?

Perhaps they have seen your LinkedIn profile. Perhaps you referred to them by someone who knows your work and is a strong proponent of it. Perhaps they saw you speak at a group were you are the expert on stage, presenting on that situation.

Being the expert in the field changes the rules because, “the rules,” are designed for the average individual– the one who is compliant. There is no reason to bend for them. If you are seen as the expert, you have opportunities that other people don’t have.

How do you present yourself as an expert? I gave one example earlier – – you are up on stage at a conference and are presenting.

Here’s another. You have written about this subject for years. Books are a business card for a lot of people. After all, when you think about it, what is a book telling us? Is telling us that you have knowledge and expertise on a particular subject that makes you different than other people. Pretty simple.

So if you want to be found, If you want to be sought after, If you want to avoid the resume trap so that when they call you up and say, “Jeff, we would like to talk with you about an opportunity with a client of ours.”

“Great. Let’s talk!”

“Do you have a resume?”

“No. I don’t have resume. You know about my background. You reached out to me, remember? Look, you found me on LinkedIn (or saw me speak or read my book), and time to write a resume. I have a full plate ahead of me.”

That’s the easiest way to do it.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

A Creative Idea for Marketing Yourself on LinkedIn

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a creative and clever idea for marketing yourself on LinkedIn.

Summary

I just saw a great instance of a creative use of QR codes on LinkedIn. You know how you normally encouraged to put a photo in on your profile page? Someone used a QR code.

It could be in use a little bit better because what the person did is replicate the summary area of the LinkedIn profile but then they directed people to a page where the resume was. Very smart utilization! And it is something easy to do.

There are a lot of apps and services that will help you create a QR code. In another video, I suggest that everyone had their resume online using a service like wix.com.Wix is a free service; you can post anything that you want there. But your resume up there because they were recruiters out there who are trying to find resumes on line.

Give them a free vehicle to find it. This way they don’t have to contend with the job boards and the tens of thousands of dollars to find people. That is is about simply about third-party recruiters, that’s about corporate recruiters as well.

So create a page on wix.com for your resume; they use a QR code on LinkedIn that directs people to their resume from the LinkedIn profile.

I suspect (I haven’t looked at this carefully, yet) that instead of substituting for the picture, there are places where you can upload images onto your profile and then direct people to your resume homepage.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Do What Rookie Recruiters Do – Job Search Radio

You can respond to work the recruiter by the superficial questions they ask and the lack of understanding of your answers.

On this podcast, I encourage you to act like a rookie recruiter, learn and grow.

Summary

Years ago, I used to train beginning recruiters–

You know, little puppies who never did the job before eager wanted to do the right thing. Always asking me, “what do I do now? What do I do now?” Like a big sheepdog… loveable . . . You would like them and they want to do the right thing . . . They would get on the phone and sound horrible! They we get off the phone very depressed.

“I did a terrible job on this one.”

I would pack them on the head. “This is your time to make some mistakes. I’m going to give you a list of firms to call and I want you to practice saying what I tell you to say and with time you are going to get better. You’re going to have to make your mistakes and get used to the fact that at the beginning you just don’t know what you are doing.”

“When you interview job applicants, I’m going to give you some basic questions but, at the end of the day, you don’t really know what you doing yet. You will only collect basic information and, from there, I will send you back for more.”

They would follow my instructions and, from there, they would get more confident and get further down the interview Road. If they were doing business development, they would get better at it because they were learning along the way. From those experiences, they would develop more confidence and more expertise.

You know where I’m going with this one, folks?

I’m talking to you. There are times you just got to make your mistakes. I want you to call firms and talk with them about opportunities. Don’t start with the “A” organizations That you really want to work for. Start with the “C’s,” the ones you don’t really care about that much.

Just get on the phone, call them and talk to the hiring manager. Making mistakes and get better. It’s not going to take you all that long, just like a dozen with these people.

With the rookie recruiters, they usually don’t even know the feeling that they’re working in. Thus, in IT, they had to learn the basics of technology in order to discuss it intelligently. They have to learn the tech terminology. You wouldn’t have to do that, would you?

Of course not! You would have to learn the sales stuff just like they had to learn. It doesn’t take long and you start to get better as you start to have successes.

That’s really my advice for you– start getting on the phone. Start calling people. Introduce yourself, tell them what you are trying to accomplish and start to promote yourself. Start getting information about you out there. Reach out to people, ask for advice. Make your mistakes (yes I want to practice before you call, like I would with the rookie recruiters. I expect you’ll become fearful like most people do at the beginning but then, after the call you all grown and say to yourself, “That was awful. That was terrible.”

Then, I will ask you to ask yourself, “What could I have done better? Where was the mistake? How did it break down? What can I do differently next time?”

This is a learning process.

You see, you’ve been trained out of this industrial mindset to be perfect. You’re not. You won’t be. But, I want you to start getting better.

The only way you can get better is by practice, repetition, making your mistakes and not really worried about the consequences of it. Do you think this hiring managers going to say, “Hey! I spoke to this one. He’s an idiot!” Do you think

He’s going to say that to you? Do you think she’s going to insult you over the phone? Do you think she’s going to yell at you, “What is wrong with you?”

Of course not. So what are you afraid of? Just start talking to people, like working recruiters for 20 years old and no less than the door and just are making your mistakes.

You are not going to make many in the basic mistake you’re going to make is going to come from the fear. The way you overcome fear is through practice and repetition.

So practice, then repeat. Practice. Repeat. Get better things and then, lo and behold, you will have great conversations with people

Should you expect it to be your first call? Probably not. Do you think you will get better by the fifth or sixth call? Probably. Are you going to be perfect? No. With time and practice you will be getting better..

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know … Read more about this episode…

Start at the Top

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to do what headhunters are trained to do — start at the top.

Summary

This is one of those classic tips. It’s absolutely timeless. I’ll talk with you about how I’ve been trained as a recruiter to give you a sense of why I’m suggesting this.

I’ve been a recruiter for more than 40 years and, again, no disrespect to HR, I was always trained to circumvent HR– to try and go directly to hiring managers, to go the top of the organization and work my way down from there, to have the management of that organization, the management of that function, tell HR that they want to work with me, rather than have HR decide that they wanted to work with me.

Why was that important? Because HR is …the term as a gatekeeper, but it’s a really a misnomer. Human resources is designed to to shield hiring managers from decisions and to save them time. Some are exceptional, but they tend to be the exceptions. Most are average, they are overworked, overwhelmed and have too much on their plate and very rules driven. Discernment is not their strong suit; again, no disrespect to HR, but recognize that the typical day for HR professionals may involve interviewing X number of people, returning phone calls, trying to get a clearer picture of what a particular hiring manager’s doing, writing reports on the interviews that he or she did the previous day… on and on and on with a lot of drudgery.

It’s hard to maintain the sense of life and not become a bureaucrat. In contrast, the hiring manager has a vested interest in bringing on the best talent, not that HR doesn’t, but they are measured in different ways. They’re critiqued in different ways versus the hiring manager who was exceptional talent.

My encouragement to you is to do like what I was taught – – start at the top work and your way down. If you are a marketing professional, contact the CMO over the organization. If you are a salesperson, contact the head of sales of that organization. If you work in IT, contact the chief technology officer or the CIO of the organization.

Start at the top and work your way down. Make sure that you understand what it is that you’re asking for when you contact them and don’t just simply wander in your like a jerk, completely unprepared because all that you do is waste then is waste your time and theirs. A simple thing to say when contacting them is, ” I understand that your organization might benefit from. I’m an individual who’s been doing this for X number of years with so and so. I’d like to speak with you about what I’m capable of. Can we schedule time to do that? What would work best for you?” It’s that simple.

It was three, maybe four sentences in total. You want to rehearse this so it sounds natural and NOT rehearsed. Natural but not rehearsed.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Posting Your Résumé on the Web

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of not just uploading a resume to job boards but suggests a free alternative that allows recruiters to find your resume for free.

Summary

SUMMARY

A lot of people use job boards. They shouldn’t be the only tool in your quiver but their great tool.

Here’s another tool to use.

Instead of just putting your resume upon a job board, why don’t you set up a website purely for your reume? You can use a service like wix.com and creaEte a one-page website (wix allows more),keyword optimized, SEO optimized so people can find it through Google.

Wix is free to there’s no excuse for a financial standpoint not to do this. All were talking about is taking your existing resume and putting it up on the web for people to find it for free.

Now if you make changes to your resume and other places, you will also need to change it on wix.

You know about LinkedIn and making sure your profile is set up well so that it is also keyword and SEO optimized. You need to do the same with your resume on wix or any other site you put your resume on.

The only cause that you will have is if you want to get your own domain. Otherwise they will issue one like jeffaltman.wix.com (that is not my real address. If it is a website is up your accident). That address is fine but you wait may want something specific to you and your taste. It would cost $10/$14 to get a custom domain.

Since you are giving it out to anyone it doesn’t matter if you have your own domain or not.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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