google-site-verification: googleb943d61bcb9cdbf7.html

When Do You Start Looking for Your Next Job? | Job Search Radio

Ep 267 Congratulations! You’ve landed your next position. When should you start looking for your next job?

Summary

Congratulations! You've got your next job. You can take a deep breath. Exhale. Relax. You've landed.

I don't want you to start resting on your laurels because that is the mistake too many job hunters make.

You see, your next job search begins today. Again, I want you to hear this. Your next job search begins today. That doesn't mean you're going to change organizations. You may start thinking about what the next position is within your current organization you want to move up to, what you need to know and learn, who you need to connect with in the organization to become known as someone who they would be interested in.

Don't just rest on your laurels. Start building your network in your new firm and outside your new firm to target people who would be useful to you, to learn the things that you don't know in order to be qualified for that next position.

At the end of the day, too many people sit back, relax and lurch from job search to job search based upon the economy, whether they've been laid off, whether they are suddenly angry at their boss... Bad mistake.

Put yourself in the position to be found. Start looking for that next job and start learning what you need to know in order to be qualified for that next job. Network with the people who can help you find that next job or would be in the position to hire you for that next job and with building those relationships.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Smart Job Search

job-search

Most people begin their job search by saying to themselves, “I’ve had it. I think it’s time to make a change.” They know what they don’t want but haven’t taken the time to figure out what will satisfy them or what will please them.

Organizing a job search is not about flipping resumes to job ads like a cook in a fast food restaurant, nor is it only about what you want to do. It also involves careful thought and understanding about how your experience “fits” the job market.

In addition, you must know who you are and what motivates you as well as what criteria are important enough to be uncompromising about and on which ones you’re willing to be flexible.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2016

Continued

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Would You Do?

 

I pose a provocative question that will help you far beyond what you realize.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

 

The Question to Ask Yourself BEFORE You Start Your Job Search

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you the critical question to ask your self at the beginning of your job search.

———————————————————————————————————

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered

 

Preparing for the Next Recession or Layoff

 

Hangout with Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. Preparing for the Next Recession or Layoff.

——————————————————————————————————-

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

Start at the Top

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to do what headhunters are trained to do — start at the top.

——————–

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

The Two Best Ways to Conduct a Job Search

Most of the time when I write about different elements of job hunting, I am dissecting a small piece of the process and trying to offer you a better way of doing what you are doing or fix something that is broken.

Here, I want to be explicit and tell you the two best ways to look for work . . . other than have an agent or recruiter find the job for you, of course. Actually, that is a mistaken notion. Good recruiters fill positions for their corporate clients and take into consideration the needs, wants and desires of the job hunter, meshing both in their work. They do not work for you; they work for the institution that pays them.

And one thing I know about recruiters is that they have a bias to prefer representing the passive job hunter to the active one. The belief is that the active one is failing where they are or were laid off because they are not as good as the staff person who was retained. Thus technique number one is to be “found” rather than appear to be an active job hunter.

“But, Jeff, I need a job. I need to send my resume out an put it on the job boards to get found, don’t I?”

Well, yes and no. Even on job boards, you can be found by using the blind resume feature where they hide your name and contact information to obscure that you are who you are. I’ll come back to this another time.

The trick to being found is using your network and your social network to support your job search. How good is your LinkedIn profile? Is it keyword rish enough to find you? If you look at job ads for positions like the one you want and are qualified for, would someone looking for those keywords ever find you?

Re-write your LinkedIn profile to make sure of that.

Go to ZoomInfo.com and make sure they have your correct name and title. Same with Spoke.com.

Do you have a website or blog? Recruiters love to do Boolean searches that find people who blog. They think they have found platinum every time they connect with someone that way. What you really have done is put bait out to draw the bee to the honey.

The second way to search for work is networking. More than 75% of positions are filled by networking with others . . . but I don’t mean selfish networking; I mean generous networking. many entworking groups are no more than speed dating meetings. Everyone walks up to the mike and says, I am looking for a job as a such and such or I do such and such. Ugh! The best thing about this approach is that it gives you a place to practice so that when you speak to people in the real world, you are less inhibited.

The best way to network is through volunteerism, attending conferences and putting yourself out there, ideally when you actually have a job.

Nick Corcodillos from “Ask the Headhunter” (Nick publishes a good tip letter every week; go his site to subscribe) printed a wonderful thank you letter this week from a job hunter who wrote about how his suggestions led to him finding the job he wanted in another city by networking with the founder of a trade event. That connection led him to someone, attending another industry event, where he was able to really connect with the person who introduced him to someone who hired him. Read the full story here.

Industry events and conferences are places where you can network with leaders and not just co-workers and put yourself in a position to be recommended for work. Go to trade shows and industry conferences regularly. At worst, you’ll find yourself with a new group of friends IF you nourish the relationship.

Getting Started: 5 Things You Need to Decide When You Begin a Job Search

Plan Ahead

If you are like most people, you are being lied to or have been lied to by your manager about your prospects of losing your job.

You see when most people are worried about their jobs, they ask people they know at their firm, co-workers, managers, maybe a director for assurance or tidbits of information that will give them an idea about what lies ahead for them.

And these peole often don’t know any more than you do which explains why so many have also been fired or, to use the polite term, “laid off” for being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

In most cases, it wasn’t a question of firing incompetent people that caused someone to be “let go” (that’s the last time I use a polite term for “fired”). There has been and continues to be a maelstrom in the global economy that is causing firms to fire people for no more reason than not being able to afford them any more.

Yet people keep asking their managers who are several levels below the real decision makers whether their job is safe or their heads are on the chopping block.

I know this behavior passes for safe decision-making among most people but, frankly blind trust in people not deserving of your trust is just foolish.

Think for yourself and plan ahead.

You see, most people are completely stupid and learn how to job hunt through trial and error–that’s another nice way of saying, “blowing opportunities they could have been hired for through ignorance of how to job hunt.”

You see, job hunting, resume writing, job interviewing, negotiating salary, to name a few, are all different skills from doing your actual job yet people think that they can simply regurgitate some answers to questions at a job interview and like magic they will be find work again.

They also blindly believe all the stories they are told by recruiters, both corporate and third party, where they are told about “great opportunities!”

Bull-hockey!

You are interviewing with companies that want to hire another drone to replace the last one who left them.

So stop kidding yourself and start learning what you need to learn in order to not be another sheep and be a success.

Find out about the job market and firms that have been laying people off.

Read and re-read the articles here

Become educated.

Practice how to interview.

Write and update your resume before you need it.

Plan ahead.

After all, the person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest although those are great qualities to have.

People get ahead by being alert to opportunity.

Sometimes, they are internal to their firm. More often they are not.

Become a prepared job hunter. Order any of my relevant books and guides to job hunting as PDF’s or on Amazon for Kindle.

If you prefer, order other people’s books on Amazon

No matter what you do, don’t stay ignorant.

© 2012 All rights reserved Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Anticipate Change and Act

A lifetime is not a long time and although we like to think ourselves as immortal, life has a way of showing us how foolish we are to hold that belief. As I read of Detroit’s bankruptcy filing, I was reminded that the same is true with many of the decisions we make professionally and personally.

Using myself as an example, I owned recruiting businesses for many years until I realized that the economic climate in New York and nationally made it advantageous to sell my firm and join another. I could have fought on and tried to persevere in the face of business conditions that were “far beyond my pay grade.” I made a decision and it was a good one.

When I met my wife, we bought our first home together on Long Island, a cape on a 60 x 100 lot, about 1800 square feet. if you stretched your arms, it seemed like we could touch our neighbors’ homes (an exaggeration but you get the idea. We lived very close to our neighbors).

About 6 years after we bought the house it had more than doubled in value. I asked myself, “How much more could this house go up in price?” We sold it at almost the top of the market (we missed it by three weeks) and moved to Northeastern Pennsylvania and 7 years later to North Carolina.

Professionally, I sold my firm to someone I knew but there came a time when I recognized the signal that it was time to leave. It came in the form of a series of episodes following my previous wife’s passing, my recovery from Achilles tendon surgery and my listening to him tell me that he didn’t have money to pay me yet giving cash to a co-worker that was a drinking buddy of his.

I joined another firm and was successful despite the owner being volatile at times and conducting himself in ways that wound up in the news (I won’t go into details; it isn’t necessary).

I left to join my current firm after discovering that this man didn’t tell me that he had collected a fee from a client that had clandestinely hired an applicant from me. The fee was sizable and since I was engaged in an international adoption that he knew about, the money was significant to our family.

There are many other times that I have looked around at things going on in my life and realized that I could ignore the signals or take action.

Detroit didn’t take action even though it knew that the math no longer added up. The auto industry accepted crushing deals with unions until they could no longer afford to pay them. The City of Detroit was unable to negotiate with its unions (and the unions unwilling to negotiate with the City of Detroit) even though the population was one third its previous size and it was obvious that the city could not meet it’s obligations.

We can engage in magical thinking, pretending that “everything will work out” or we can be proactive, anticipating the outcome of events and take action.

You don’t need to do so instantly. Certainly, in the examples I pointed to in my life, I didn’t take instant action. Often it took a week or two to just stay still and think things through before doing so.

Yet I didn’t become an ostrich and stick my head in the ground. I saw a problem and acted on it.

Where can you take action?

What are you ignoring professionally and/or personally that should be attended to?

The things that grows best in an untended garden are weeds. What can you do TODAY? Tomorrow? In the next week?

%d bloggers like this: