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Do I Need to Use a Cover Letter? | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question asking whether you need to use a cover letter.

Summary

Is important to provide a cover letter well applying for a software engineering position?

I think I think the right answer is, "why wouldn't you use a cover letter?"

It's a sales opportunity. If you think it's just another chance to say, "I am forwarding my resume to you for the position of software engineer with your company. I believe will be an excellent fit for the position, " you are wasting your own time and you are missing the opportunity.

People tend to look a job hunting as to you. In fact, is a chance to sell yourself to an organization that you can perform a cover letter was just such a document. Resumes just such a document. Think of it as an opportunity to present you and your capabilities.

If you are uncertain, if you are frightened, if you are tentative, you are not selling. What you doing you showing that you don't have confidence in your ability to solve the organizations problem that there trying to fill. That is the tip off to them.

However, if you approach it, as I said, like a sales opportunity, to say, in effect, "Hey! Look at me! I can do what you want. This is what I have done along these lines." If you do that, it is a great tool.

Asking the question, just let me know you haven't really figure that out..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Cover letters that stand out

Cover Letters That Stand Out (VIDEO)


I’m adding an extra twist to what you may be doing with your cover letter that will help you standout from the pack

Summary

Over the years, I've created plenty of videos about writing cover letters. I'm going to give you a quick rehash before I give you something new about them.

The typical cover letter might be in response to an ad.  It might be an introduction to a hiring manager.  The 1st paragraph should reflect that.

"I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was referred to you by Jeff Altman You told me you were trying to fill a position for such and such.  My understanding of the role is . . . You're looking for someone with . . . " You would then lay out in the left column what the skills were for the position (maybe you've seen a head or a job description that your friend has forwarded to you) and the functionality that is going to be performed.  In the right column, you would write down how long and how recently you can engage with it.

For example, flush left you would write

SOX compliance                                                                                                 5 years until 2015

User liaison                                                                                                         2 years current.

Manages people on-site and offshore                                                            3.2 years.  Current.

You make the fit seem obvious in this chart that you're creating for them.

Normally, I would say, "I believe you will see my background Matches up nicely for the role.  I look forward to hearing from you."

I want to encourage you to add an extra step in here.  That's the human touch.  This is a "miss" I want to acknowledge having had.  It is something I haven't encourage people to do often enough.

Like my advanced answer to the question, "Tell me about yourself," You might say something along the lines of, "I'm sure you see a lot of people and their resumes.  You say they have this background , but what makes me different is…" Then you going to some human characteristics that make you stand out.

Please don't say that you're hard-working or dedicated. Go to the humanity of the situation instead of the BS.  If you stay with hard-working or dedicated, people think to themselves, "Ugh!  Not again!"

The goal is to always differentiate yourself from others because if you are just another commodity, you're going to be paid a commodity's wage. If you are the best of the commodities you will be paid at the rate of the best of the range of the commodities. So, there's a range of salary; there is a law and there is a high.Yes, you will be at the higher point of the range, but so what?  You want to go past the range.  You always want to demonstrate that you are far superior to anyone that they say.

This does that by putting a human face on you, so that people can easily see how you stand out, instead of looking like another drone to them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Do I Need to Use a Cover Letter? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question asking whether you need to use a cover letter.

Summary

Is important to provide a cover letter well applying for a software engineering position?

I think I think the right answer is, "why wouldn't you use a cover letter?"

It's a sales opportunity. If you think it's just another chance to say, "I am forwarding my resume to you for the position of software engineer with your company. I believe will be an excellent fit for the position, " you are wasting your own time and you are missing the opportunity.

People tend to look a job hunting as to you. In fact, is a chance to sell yourself to an organization that you can perform a cover letter was just such a document. Resumes just such a document. Think of it as an opportunity to present you and your capabilities.

If you are uncertain, if you are frightened, if you are tentative, you are not selling. What you doing you showing that you don't have confidence in your ability to solve the organizations problem that there trying to fill. That is the tip off to them.

However, if you approach it, as I said, like a sales opportunity, to say, in effect, "Hey! Look at me! I can do what you want. This is what I have done along these lines." If you do that, it is a great tool.

Asking the question, just let me know you haven't really figure that out..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Explaining Employment Gaps in Your Résumé (VIDEO)

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to explain how to discuss the gap in your employment history.

Summary

Today, let's talk about how to deal with that gap in your resume . . . You know, that time in your background were took you 5 months, 8 months, 7 months . . . whatever it is to find a new position 3 years ago. How do you deal with that interruption your experience?

Some people have this silly idea that they are supposed to lie and cover it up. I must in all honesty tell you it doesn't work anymore. Employers are cooperating with one another and do background checks post-employment (after you join their firm). They will send a note to your previous employer and say, "So, Jane told us in their application that you work for your firm for such and such period of time. Does that seem somewhat accurate?" If they find inconsistency in your job application, it is grounds for termination. They can't keep you on board because, frankly, lying can get them into trouble.

Imagine for a 2nd that you are employed by them and commit some sort of crime. For example, you work on Wall Street and trade grandma's life savings down to zero. Can you imagine what happens when a lawyer gets a hold of the firm and asks, "you knew he lied on his employment application and you still kept them on board!" How do you think that would play out in the courts?

Employers have a very simple policy. They will terminate you. They will terminate you without any warning whatsoever. What they will do is meet you at your desk with security and hand you a box with your personal things and send you on your way. You don't want that to happen. Here's how you deal with it.

When you have a gap in your background, you use the cover email that you send your resume in (these are like the old cover letteyrs people use to mail the resume with. Today, that is the message area of your email) to sell yourself.

You might write in the cover email, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was recommended by so-and-so, you told me that your position for such and such." Or, you might say, "I saw your ad on such and such site that told me that you trying to hire such and such type of person. "

The 2nd paragraph my talk about your qualifications and how your background fits the role. The 3rd 1 might say something like, "you may notice my job history that for years ago I was unemployed for 6 months. During that time, the on the economy was terrible and they found it difficult to find work. Ultimately, I was able to land a job with another organization. "

Or, you might just simply say, "I had an injury at that time. I was in a car accident and had surgery. It was impossible for me to work." Or you might talk about how you assisted your dying mom during the last 6 months of her life. These are pretty common stories that employer hears.

Another one that they here is, "I took a package to leave my organization. I decided that I had not had a lengthy vacation since I was in college and decide to take 4 months to travel in China before coming back and resuming my career." What ever it is, do that in the 3rd paragraph and then come back and sell yourself in the remainder of the cover email.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in your background. Then, you have to remember what you told them in your email. So when you meet with them in person and raise the subject, they are looking for consistency. Thus, if you talk about that vacation that you took, you say, "I know a lot of people would find it difficult to believe, it was 1 of the great 4 months of my life. I love my work, but it was an opportunity to travel. I had money in the bank and decide to take advantage of this time." You just speak to them in a way that sounds absolutely sincere.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in the background.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Explaining Employment Gaps in Your Résumé

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to explain how to discuss the gap in your employment history.

Summary

Today, let's talk about how to deal with that gap in your resume . . . You know, that time in your background were took you 5 months, 8 months, 7 months . . . whatever it is to find a new position 3 years ago. How do you deal with that interruption your experience?

Some people have this silly idea that they are supposed to lie and cover it up. I must in all honesty tell you it doesn't work anymore. Employers are cooperating with one another and do background checks post-employment (after you join their firm). They will send a note to your previous employer and say, "So, Jane told us in their application that you work for your firm for such and such period of time. Does that seem somewhat accurate?" If they find inconsistency in your job application, it is grounds for termination. They can't keep you on board because, frankly, lying can get them into trouble.

Imagine for a 2nd that you are employed by them and commit some sort of crime. For example, you work on Wall Street and trade grandma's life savings down to zero. Can you imagine what happens when a lawyer gets a hold of the firm and asks, "you knew he lied on his employment application and you still kept them on board!" How do you think that would play out in the courts?

Employers have a very simple policy. They will terminate you. They will terminate you without any warning whatsoever. What they will do is meet you at your desk with security and hand you a box with your personal things and send you on your way. You don't want that to happen. Here's how you deal with it.

When you have a gap in your background, you use the cover email that you send your resume in (these are like the old cover letteyrs people use to mail the resume with. Today, that is the message area of your email) to sell yourself.

You might write in the cover email, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was recommended by so-and-so, you told me that your position for such and such." Or, you might say, "I saw your ad on such and such site that told me that you trying to hire such and such type of person. "

The 2nd paragraph my talk about your qualifications and how your background fits the role. The 3rd 1 might say something like, "you may notice my job history that for years ago I was unemployed for 6 months. During that time, the on the economy was terrible and they found it difficult to find work. Ultimately, I was able to land a job with another organization. "

Or, you might just simply say, "I had an injury at that time. I was in a car accident and had surgery. It was impossible for me to work." Or you might talk about how you assisted your dying mom during the last 6 months of her life. These are pretty common stories that employer hears.

Another one that they here is, "I took a package to leave my organization. I decided that I had not had a lengthy vacation since I was in college and decide to take 4 months to travel in China before coming back and resuming my career." What ever it is, do that in the 3rd paragraph and then come back and sell yourself in the remainder of the cover email.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in your background. Then, you have to remember what you told them in your email. So when you meet with them in person and raise the subject, they are looking for consistency. Thus, if you talk about that vacation that you took, you say, "I know a lot of people would find it difficult to believe, it was 1 of the great 4 months of my life. I love my work, but it was an opportunity to travel. I had money in the bank and decide to take advantage of this time." You just speak to them in a way that sounds absolutely sincere.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in the background.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

To Whom Do You Address Your Cover Letter? (VIDEO)


This is a trick question. Let me explain why.

Summary

On this video, I want to answer someone's question about cover letters. The question is, "To whom do I address my cover letter?"

I think of this is a trick question. That's because I have to ask, what is a cover letter in the age of email? If you are sending an attachment, if you think Anyone is going to open that file to read your attachment, you are kidding yourself. What we will read is the body of them by email And, as such, that is the home of cover letters these days.

The 2nd thing I want to point out is to whom you do you dress it? You don't know who you're going to send it to? You're going to send it to "the HR department?" Do you think you're supposed to address that, "Dear HR Department?" Do you know how many people work there?You send your resume to a major American corporation and address it that way? How many people do you think working HR at J.P. Morgan Chase for example? Or Boeing? Or pick the name of another large firm? Ask them who you are supposed to address it to! Don't just ask randomly like this question is. As for the name of the person is responsible for recruiting for the particular type of position.

Here is the next part of the trick.You shouldn't be sending your cover letter and resume to HR. You should be sending it to the hiring manager.You want to find out the name of the hiring manager who is coordinating the search for the position you want to apply for. You don't want to be sending it to HR. You don't want to be sending it to the applicant tracking system for it to review. You want don't want to do that because you put the data Too far back in the resume and gave it the idea that the experience that you have isn't current enough. You always want to be finding the hiring manager.

Don't know who it is? Easy. Find the kind of job it is, Get on LinkedIn, if you're not connected with the person who it is, go to www.li-usa.info. Search until you can find someone who is responsible for that function. Then, use a chrome extension called Prophet. Generally, it will return email addresses for people even if you are not connected with them on LinkedIn.

Again, that is www.li-usa.info and a chrome extension called Prophet. You'll get the email address to send your resume to them. To find that person, that is on you to find in figure out.. NEVER EVER apply for jobs doing applicant tracking system And, really, if you can avoid it, skip HR. They can decide who to reject, but they cannot decide who to hire.

No disrespect. I have known a lot of fabulous HR people but it is not their job to hire. Their job is to manage the firm's human resources. To translate, in this particular case, the recruiter Acts as an "screener" Not someone who hires.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Three Cover Letter Rules | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses three rules for writing cover letters you must employ.

Summary

I see cover letters all the time and people foolishly send them as a separate attachment. No one is ever going to open a separate attachment. They go right to the attachment that looks like it's going to be the resume.

They make the mistake of addressing it as, "Dear Human Resources Manager" or "Dear Recruiter," or some generic introduction like that. Don't do that.

Number 1, put your cover letter into the body of the email so that no attachment is necessary for it. Number 2. Don't address anyone. Once you are addressing it to do so and so and got out with a real person is and using a generic introduction, it gives the impression of it being a form letter. Don't do it.

Third, 3 paragraphs.

The 1st one is an introduction and explains why you are sending the email. The 2nd paragraph is to lay out what it is about your background that you fits what they are looking for. 3rd is you do a closing. The closing should be something along the lines of what you are going to follow up.

"If I don't hear from you I will give you a call the day after tomorrow to see if you might be interested in scheduling an appointment. Really very simple.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Do Recruiters Read Cover Letters?

Do Recruiters Read Cover Letters? (VIDEO)


Things have changed since the days of old and now hope someone questions whether recruiters actually read cover letters. Here is my answer.


Summary

The question for today is, "Do recruiters read cover letters?"

The answer is: Not if you send them as a separate attachment.

I'm looking to pop open the cover letter sent to me as an attachment. However, if you send it as a "cover email" (you know, using the body of your email to communicate what would have been a cover letter to lay out a case for yourself), then you have a chance of my reading it. However, it has to be clear as to what it is you're attempting to communicate about your background and how it fits the role, including for.

I'm not going to read, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I understand you're trying to fill a position for a such and such. I believe my background with such and such, coupled with my driving determination would make me a strong person for your client." I'm not going to read that nonsense.

Here's what I want to read:
I want to read something that takes the requirements of the position and sticks them in the left-hand column in the right-hand column. I want to see how long and how recently you perform that function. If you want to include what the tasks of the job are, I would like that, too. That's because what you're doing is using the cover email to make a case for your candidacy instead of sending a bunch of fluff.

No one wants to read fluff! After all, you're not selling anything. You just saying a bunch of garbage.

Use the body of your email to lay out a case for yourself in the way that I suggested and then you have a chance of people reading it.

Not just name, but corporate recruiters at agency recruiters, as well.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Bravado Cover Letters Don’t Work | Job Search Radio

I received a cover letter and resume from someone that exuded such bravado . . . a signal that the person is not qualified for the job they applied for.

Summary

I received an email from someone with a resume applying for a job heading up a function for major American firm.  I described the size of the firm in the job description and I received this note, "I am ready, trained and prepared to begin for the risk... Role.  Please find my resume and cover letter below."

When I post a position. I am very clear about what my client is looking for the way of experience.  I don't want to scream people out, but I'm required to do that because my client will not call me will never talk to me again if I waste her time.  That's the nature of what recruiter dollars. Where the filter, the head of the client where we are paid for evaluating, assessing and referring individuals who they want to hire who they ultimately hire and then they pay us.  You are obligated to work there for certain period of time after all this happens so that we earn their fee.

So, I received this resume for this have a function and I receive a resume of someone who has a degree (that's good), and Associates before that. He talks about then asked for team-building experience and that he has worked as a designer and business manager for a firm that does content design, video planning. He does budgeting, planning, scheduling and other stuff for the past 2+ years.

Let's get practical for a second.

I told you that this was a role heading up a function for a major American corporation.  This person entitles themselves as, "designer and business manager."  Not exactly a fit so far from what little I've told you about the job.  It doesn't sound that way to you, right?  It doesn't sound that way to me either.

I'll simply say that as the teaching piece here, make a case for your candidacy.  The bravado assertion is the 1st single to me as a reader that this person is not qualified.  People who actually are. Never talk that way.  They always speak in an understated, self-assured manner, not with that sort of BS bravado that says, "hey, I can do that job.  I'm trained."  It is never that way.

I've only done this for more than 40 years. I've never seen anyone who has acted that way pull it off.

I just want to discourage you from doing this kind of crap because it just shows badly on you. At the end of the day I pop open the resume, I see it, and hit delete.  What was the point??

Again, make your case in your resume, not with bravado but with facts.  Make your resume demonstrate how your background fits the requirements of the job as well as the functionality of the position that the firm is going to have you do.

For example, if you see a job description that says, "Requirements," that's a tip off!  This is what the firm is looking for.  That's what I am looking for on behalf of the client.  If it talks about, ", Responsibilities," a, there is another tip off!  Where you have perform the functions of the role already, but it in your resume!  Where you haven't don't whine.

Lying eventually (like in the 1st 5 minutes of the conversation) will be exposed.  Worse yet, if you are hired, you will be fired when the. Is that what you want?  Of course not.

"No BS."  should be your mantra.  Be factual. Be powerful.  Be accurate.  Be direct.  Just don't try BS-ing.  It will always come back and haunt you.

This person needs coaching from me and I created a site called JobSearchCoachingHQ.com with advice for job hunters good anywhere in the English-speaking world.  We'll talk with you about starting your search, writing a resume, marketing yourself, interviewing tough interview and then preparing for them.  It will talk about using LinkedIn effectively.  Salary negotiation – – you don't know how to negotiate salary and I have ways that go from very gentle to what are referred to as, "ball breaker techniques."  They will help you get more money out of the firm. They don't always work, and you may not be capable of doing one or the other or all the ones in the middle. But there is advice there.  In addition, you can ask me questions that will help you with your job search.

Again, the site is JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.  Very inexpensive.  It's the price of 2 hardcover books in order to be able to ask me questions and get access to great information that will help you find work more quickly.

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Cover Letters That Stand Out | Job Search Radio

On today’s show, I add an extra twist to what you may be doing with your cover letter that will help you standout from the pack.

Summary

Over the years, I've created plenty of videos about writing cover letters. I'm going to give you a quick rehash before I give you something new about them.

The typical cover letter might be in response to an ad.  It might be an introduction to a hiring manager.  The 1st paragraph should reflect that.

"I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was referred to you by Jeff Altman You told me you were trying to fill a position for such and such.  My understanding of the role is . . . You're looking for someone with . . . " You would then lay out in the left column what the skills were for the position (maybe you've seen a head or a job description that your friend has forwarded to you) and the functionality that is going to be performed.  In the right column, you would write down how long and how recently you can engage with it.

For example, flush left you would write

SOX compliance                                                                                                 5 years until 2015

User liaison                                                                                                         2 years current.

Manages people on-site and offshore                                                            3.2 years.  Current.

You make the fit seem obvious in this chart that you're creating for them.

Normally, I would say, "I believe you will see my background Matches up nicely for the role.  I look forward to hearing from you."

I want to encourage you to add an extra step in here.  That's the human touch.  This is a "miss" I want to acknowledge having had.  It is something I haven't encourage people to do often enough.

Like my advanced answer to the question, "Tell me about yourself," You might say something along the lines of, "I'm sure you see a lot of people and their resumes.  You say they have this background , but what makes me different is…" Then you going to some human characteristics that make you stand out.

Please don't say that you're hard-working or dedicated. Go to the humanity of the situation instead of the BS.  If you stay with hard-working or dedicated, people think to themselves, "Ugh!  Not again!"

The goal is to always differentiate yourself from others because if you are just another commodity, you're going to be paid a commodity's wage. If you are the best of the commodities you will be paid at the rate of the best of the range of the commodities. So, there's a range of salary; there is a law and there is a high.Yes, you will be at the higher point of the range, but so what?  You want to go past the range.  You always want to demonstrate that you are far superior to anyone that they say.

This does that by putting a human face on you, so that people can easily see how you stand out, instead of looking like another drone to them.

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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