To Whom Do You Address Your Cover Letter? (VIDEO)


This is a trick question. Let me explain why.

Summary

On this video, I want to answer someone's question about cover letters. The question is, "To whom do I address my cover letter?"

I think of this is a trick question. That's because I have to ask, what is a cover letter in the age of email? If you are sending an attachment, if you think Anyone is going to open that file to read your attachment, you are kidding yourself. What we will read is the body of them by email And, as such, that is the home of cover letters these days.

The 2nd thing I want to point out is to whom you do you dress it? You don't know who you're going to send it to? You're going to send it to "the HR department?" Do you think you're supposed to address that, "Dear HR Department?" Do you know how many people work there?You send your resume to a major American corporation and address it that way? How many people do you think working HR at J.P. Morgan Chase for example? Or Boeing? Or pick the name of another large firm? Ask them who you are supposed to address it to! Don't just ask randomly like this question is. As for the name of the person is responsible for recruiting for the particular type of position.

Here is the next part of the trick.You shouldn't be sending your cover letter and resume to HR. You should be sending it to the hiring manager.You want to find out the name of the hiring manager who is coordinating the search for the position you want to apply for. You don't want to be sending it to HR. You don't want to be sending it to the applicant tracking system for it to review. You want don't want to do that because you put the data Too far back in the resume and gave it the idea that the experience that you have isn't current enough. You always want to be finding the hiring manager.

Don't know who it is? Easy. Find the kind of job it is, Get on LinkedIn, if you're not connected with the person who it is, go to www.li-usa.info. Search until you can find someone who is responsible for that function. Then, use a chrome extension called Prophet. Generally, it will return email addresses for people even if you are not connected with them on LinkedIn.

Again, that is www.li-usa.info and a chrome extension called Prophet. You'll get the email address to send your resume to them. To find that person, that is on you to find in figure out.. NEVER EVER apply for jobs doing applicant tracking system And, really, if you can avoid it, skip HR. They can decide who to reject, but they cannot decide who to hire.

No disrespect. I have known a lot of fabulous HR people but it is not their job to hire. Their job is to manage the firm's human resources. To translate, in this particular case, the recruiter Acts as an "screener" Not someone who hires.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Three Cover Letter Rules | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses three rules for writing cover letters you must employ.

Summary

I see cover letters all the time and people foolishly send them as a separate attachment. No one is ever going to open a separate attachment. They go right to the attachment that looks like it's going to be the resume.

They make the mistake of addressing it as, "Dear Human Resources Manager" or "Dear Recruiter," or some generic introduction like that. Don't do that.

Number 1, put your cover letter into the body of the email so that no attachment is necessary for it. Number 2. Don't address anyone. Once you are addressing it to do so and so and got out with a real person is and using a generic introduction, it gives the impression of it being a form letter. Don't do it.

Third, 3 paragraphs.

The 1st one is an introduction and explains why you are sending the email. The 2nd paragraph is to lay out what it is about your background that you fits what they are looking for. 3rd is you do a closing. The closing should be something along the lines of what you are going to follow up.

"If I don't hear from you I will give you a call the day after tomorrow to see if you might be interested in scheduling an appointment. Really very simple.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Do Recruiters Read Cover Letters?

Do Recruiters Read Cover Letters? (VIDEO)


Things have changed since the days of old and now hope someone questions whether recruiters actually read cover letters. Here is my answer.


Summary

The question for today is, "Do recruiters read cover letters?"

The answer is: Not if you send them as a separate attachment.

I'm looking to pop open the cover letter sent to me as an attachment. However, if you send it as a "cover email" (you know, using the body of your email to communicate what would have been a cover letter to lay out a case for yourself), then you have a chance of my reading it. However, it has to be clear as to what it is you're attempting to communicate about your background and how it fits the role, including for.

I'm not going to read, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I understand you're trying to fill a position for a such and such. I believe my background with such and such, coupled with my driving determination would make me a strong person for your client." I'm not going to read that nonsense.

Here's what I want to read:
I want to read something that takes the requirements of the position and sticks them in the left-hand column in the right-hand column. I want to see how long and how recently you perform that function. If you want to include what the tasks of the job are, I would like that, too. That's because what you're doing is using the cover email to make a case for your candidacy instead of sending a bunch of fluff.

No one wants to read fluff! After all, you're not selling anything. You just saying a bunch of garbage.

Use the body of your email to lay out a case for yourself in the way that I suggested and then you have a chance of people reading it.

Not just name, but corporate recruiters at agency recruiters, as well.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Bravado Cover Letters Don’t Work | Job Search Radio

I received a cover letter and resume from someone that exuded such bravado . . . a signal that the person is not qualified for the job they applied for.

Summary

I received an email from someone with a resume applying for a job heading up a function for major American firm.  I described the size of the firm in the job description and I received this note, "I am ready, trained and prepared to begin for the risk... Role.  Please find my resume and cover letter below."

When I post a position. I am very clear about what my client is looking for the way of experience.  I don't want to scream people out, but I'm required to do that because my client will not call me will never talk to me again if I waste her time.  That's the nature of what recruiter dollars. Where the filter, the head of the client where we are paid for evaluating, assessing and referring individuals who they want to hire who they ultimately hire and then they pay us.  You are obligated to work there for certain period of time after all this happens so that we earn their fee.

So, I received this resume for this have a function and I receive a resume of someone who has a degree (that's good), and Associates before that. He talks about then asked for team-building experience and that he has worked as a designer and business manager for a firm that does content design, video planning. He does budgeting, planning, scheduling and other stuff for the past 2+ years.

Let's get practical for a second.

I told you that this was a role heading up a function for a major American corporation.  This person entitles themselves as, "designer and business manager."  Not exactly a fit so far from what little I've told you about the job.  It doesn't sound that way to you, right?  It doesn't sound that way to me either.

I'll simply say that as the teaching piece here, make a case for your candidacy.  The bravado assertion is the 1st single to me as a reader that this person is not qualified.  People who actually are. Never talk that way.  They always speak in an understated, self-assured manner, not with that sort of BS bravado that says, "hey, I can do that job.  I'm trained."  It is never that way.

I've only done this for more than 40 years. I've never seen anyone who has acted that way pull it off.

I just want to discourage you from doing this kind of crap because it just shows badly on you. At the end of the day I pop open the resume, I see it, and hit delete.  What was the point??

Again, make your case in your resume, not with bravado but with facts.  Make your resume demonstrate how your background fits the requirements of the job as well as the functionality of the position that the firm is going to have you do.

For example, if you see a job description that says, "Requirements," that's a tip off!  This is what the firm is looking for.  That's what I am looking for on behalf of the client.  If it talks about, ", Responsibilities," a, there is another tip off!  Where you have perform the functions of the role already, but it in your resume!  Where you haven't don't whine.

Lying eventually (like in the 1st 5 minutes of the conversation) will be exposed.  Worse yet, if you are hired, you will be fired when the. Is that what you want?  Of course not.

"No BS."  should be your mantra.  Be factual. Be powerful.  Be accurate.  Be direct.  Just don't try BS-ing.  It will always come back and haunt you.

This person needs coaching from me and I created a site called JobSearchCoachingHQ.com with advice for job hunters good anywhere in the English-speaking world.  We'll talk with you about starting your search, writing a resume, marketing yourself, interviewing tough interview and then preparing for them.  It will talk about using LinkedIn effectively.  Salary negotiation – – you don't know how to negotiate salary and I have ways that go from very gentle to what are referred to as, "ball breaker techniques."  They will help you get more money out of the firm. They don't always work, and you may not be capable of doing one or the other or all the ones in the middle. But there is advice there.  In addition, you can ask me questions that will help you with your job search.

Again, the site is JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.  Very inexpensive.  It's the price of 2 hardcover books in order to be able to ask me questions and get access to great information that will help you find work more quickly.

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Cover Letters That Stand Out | Job Search Radio

On today’s show, I add an extra twist to what you may be doing with your cover letter that will help you standout from the pack.

 

Summary

Over the years, I’ve created plenty of videos about writing cover letters. I’m going to give you a quick rehash before I give you something new about them.

The typical cover letter might be in response to an ad.  It might be an introduction to a hiring manager.  The 1st paragraph should reflect that.

I’m forwarding my resume to you because I was referred to you by Jeff Altman You told me you were trying to fill a position for such and such.  My understanding of the role is . . . You’re looking for someone with . . . ” You would then lay out in the left column what the skills were for the position (maybe you’ve seen a head or a job description that your friend has forwarded to you) and the functionality that is going to be performed.  In the right column, you would write down how long and how recently you can engage with it.

For example, flush left you would write

SOX compliance                                                                                                 5 years until 2015

User liaison                                                                                                         2 years current.

Manages people on-site and offshore                                                            3.2 years.  Current.

You make the fit seem obvious in this chart that you’re creating for them.

Normally, I would say, “I believe you will see my background Matches up nicely for the role.  I look forward to hearing from you.

I want to encourage you to add an extra step in here.  That’s the human touch.  This is a “miss” I want to acknowledge having had.  It is something I haven’t encourage people to do often enough.

Like my advanced answer to the question, “Tell me about yourself,” You might say something along the lines of, “I’m sure you see a lot of people and their resumes.  You say they have this background , but what makes me different is…” Then you going to some human characteristics that make you stand out.

Please don’t say that you’re hard-working or dedicated. Go to the humanity of the situation instead of the BS.  If you stay with hard-working or dedicated, people think to themselves, “Ugh!  Not again!”

The goal is to always differentiate yourself from others because if you are just another commodity, you’re going to be paid a commodity’s wage. If you are the best of the commodities you will be paid at the rate of the best of the range of the commodities. So, there’s a range of salary; there is a law and there is a high.Yes, you will be at the higher point of the range, but so what?  You want to go past the range.  You always want to demonstrate that you are far superior to anyone that they say.

This does that by putting a human face on you, so that people can easily see how you stand out, instead of looking like another drone to them.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

How Fatal Is This Cover Letter Mistake? – Job Search Radio

A person continues by writing, “Last week I sent out 8 cover letters, and today I realized instead of “I am writing to apply”, I wrote “I am applying to write”. Eek! How embarrassing. Would this be make or break for you? I haven’t heard back from them yet, but it’s only been a week so I wasn’t worried”

Summary

This is a question I read from someone; I think it’s a useful question because it speaks to the heart of mistakes people make with cover letters.

How fatal is this mistake?

Last week, I sent out 8 cover letters; today, I realized that instead of writing, “I am writing to apply,” I wrote, “I am applying to write.” How embarassing!

Would this be “make or break for you? I haven’t heard back from them but it has only been a week.

So the question is “how fatal is this mistake? As always, the answer is, “It depends.”

Depends on the nature of the job involved. Depends on whether anyone actually read your cover letter. For example, if you set it as an attachment, no one read it. It depends on the nature of the role; if you are applying for a writing job and you wrote that, it can be fatal. If you wrote for most positions, no one really cares.

They might gloss over it because people read resumes and cover letters in 6 seconds or less. In cover letters, it’s often less. If this was your “typical innocuous cover letter” sent as an attachment, no one read it. If this was a “typical innocuous letter” put into the body of an email, someone might have skimmed it quickly to see if there was something relevant in it (if it is like most cover letters, there is nothing relevant in it).

Frankly, I wouldn’t worry about it. What seems more damning is that it has been a week since you applied and no one has contacted you.You said, “only a week;” if you’re an experienced professional, that is usually the “kiss of death.” It would seem that your resume was the bigger problem, not your cover letter. If resumes don’t make the case for your candidacy, you’re not hearing from an employer. Employers only care about whether a resume “vaguely fits” what they are looking for.

So, I’m less concerned with the cover letter; I am more concerned that you haven’t gotten a response. The likelihood is you’re not going hear from them. Not having read your resume or seen the position description, I have no basis to judge why. They may have seen stronger people with tighter matches . . . many different reasons. Don’t worry about the mistake; it’s unlikely anyone noticed.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

The Format of a Perfect Cover Letter

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to create a perfect cover letter.

Summary

I want to talk with you about effective cover letters, getting to the point very quickly and demonstrated (if you are submitting your resume for a role) that you fit the job that you are applying for. Here’s the basic format of a cover letter:

Paragraph/Sentence one: I’m forwarding my resume to you because I understand you are trying to hire for a (fill in the blank). That can be the job title with some of the details of the position. For example, a software engineer with C++ in a pharmaceutical environment. I noticed a few major points of in the description; let me show you how a matchup.

Then you go through the requirements of the job, as well as the functionality of the position and how you match up. Next, you set up columns. Toward the left, you have a requirement; for example, C++. To the right, you have how long and how recently he worked with it. Again, let’s say it C++, you might write, “four years. Current.” The line might have the next point of the requirements. The next line would say, “three years. Current.”

Eventually, you get to the functionality that they are asked to perform. Again, you do the same thing.

Thus, in your cover letter, you’re making the case for how you fit the requirements and functionality that the company is asking for and that you will be performing. From there, you have to make sure that some of these points, if not all these points, or mentioned in your resume because if it is inconsistent, it will cause the employer to hesitate. This is where resume tailoring comes in handy.

Again, the format is very simple: I’m forwarding my resume to you because I understand you’re trying to hire for such and such. This is how my background matches up with what you’re looking for and what you be asking someone to do. Flush left. Flush right.

If you conclude by saying something to the effect of, “I look forward to hearing from you and meeting with you to discuss the opportunity with you,” or “I’ll follow up with you in the next few days if I don’t hear from you.” Something along these lines that ties the bow. Then you sign it.

Now, to be real clear, you don’t send this as a separate attachment. Put in the body of your email because no one wants to open up a second file with a know your resume is there. Laid out right in front of them so that when they open up the message and, trust me, will read it

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Cover Letter or No Cover Letter?


Should you use a cover letter?

Summary

Cover letter or no letter? Should you use a cover letter?

The fact is they cover letters are anachronistic if you think of it, what a cover letter was was something that was placed on top of the resume to explain to the reader what they were going to be reading. It explained what you did and how you did it and it preceded the resume.

We’re not dealing with that these days. We’re not receiving resumes delivered to us through the mail these days. We’re sending emails so the notion of putting something on top doesn’t work anymore. Some people even make the mistake of sending them as a second attachment. No one opens it up. They look for the document file name and lets them know that that one is your resume.

What do you do instead? I do believe that there is a place for you to explain to a reader what it is they will be reading.

What I want you to do is use the message area of your email like the old cover letter. In effect, that covers your resume.

Instead of saying the Monday of, “I’m forwarding my resume to you for the position of such and such (That’s paragraph one). Paragraph two says, “I believe my experience with such and such demonstrates my… You know are going with this.” These things don’t say anything and no one cares about them.

Here is what you do instead.

Start off with the same introduction and then continue on by saying, “let me show you how my background fits with the role.”

If saw an ad or been told by someone about the position, you put those qualifications in the left-hand column. In the right column, you tell them how long and how recently you’ve done that which they are looking for. In other words, you’re making it obvious to them in your “cover email” how your background fits the role. Follow that?

You can go into a little bit of detail. This is the one time I believe you should use tables in presenting credentials; not in the resume but in the cover email because you can make the fit obvious to the reader.

The final paragraph says, “if I haven’t heard from you in a few days, I will give you a quick call to see if you have any questions or whether you would like to arrange for an interview.”

It’s very simple! It also gives you permission to follow up because you giving yourself permission to follow up.

It forces you to do a little bit of work by forcing you to demonstrate how the background actually fits the requirements of the position but it will go a long way toward helping you actually get in the door.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Is There Any Way to Write a Cover Letter Without It Sounding Cliched? (VIDEO)


Cover letters can be so boring. How can I actually write a cover letter that doesn’t sound like one big cliché? Here, I offer all way to do that and two ways to submit to an employer.

Summary

Is there any way to write a cover letter without it sounding clichéd?

Hell yeah!

The clichéd ones are so boring and so awful.

I’m forwarding my resume to you for the position I saw advertised on (fill in the blank). I believe my experience with such and such and such and such makes me an ideal individual for the role.

Who cares what you think, especially when your resume is little more than spam. You’ve submitted a resume that in no way, shape or form demonstrates a fit for the role you’ve applied for.

I want to break this question into two parts.

Number one is cover letters are a bit anachronistic. Think in terms of the body of your email. If you are uploading it to an applicant tracking system, think of page one of the resume as being the cover letter.

So what will this cover letter do?

It will demonstrate a fit for the role as you understand it to be. So, if you have seen an ad, it is easiest because what you do is create was called “a T letter.” I created this idea years ago before it was named but it makes perfect sense as described this way.

Let me start with the first sentence.

I’m forwarding this resume to you based on the recommendation Jeff Altman. Jeff told me that you are looking for someone for a role . . . and you describe a couple of things that they are looking for. I want to make my fit for this role apparent to you, so let me outline my background as is relevant.

Now, in the left-hand column, you put the experiences you understand them to be. if you have job it like I said is easiest of all because you use the qualifications that they’ve listed there, the requirements of the position and perhaps the pluses that you have, as well as the the responsibilities of the role. In the right-hand column, next you’re going to put what what you’ve done and for how long and how recently you did it.

Do it this way because there is less interest in things that you did when Bill Clinton was president. then there are now. The more current stuff is always more relevant If it’s older, it tends to be less desirable). You need to be open about this and save yourself themselves them some time.

So in the right-hand column, you put down the skill involved. ln the left-hand column, you put down how long, how recently and what you have done briefly.

So let’s say there are 15 things there, that’s the equivalent of the cover letter.

So if it’s in the body of an email because you are emailing it, this is the perfect way to do it.

If you are doing it and submitting your resume and cover letter through an ATS system, then you are making this page one of the resume that you are uploading to the system.

The system will parse it, fill in a number of fields, and, after you’ve done this, you finish up by saying “I hope to hear from you soon. If I don’t, I’ll give you call in a few days to follow up.

That’s it. That’s not boring to an employer because that’s what you are doing is demonstrating how you fit the role and making it obvious to them, as opposed to having people have to sit there and “read tea leaves” to figure it out.

That’s how to NOT make it clichéd … by demonstrating your fit for the role.

 

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Should I Use a Video Cover Letter to Stand Out?


Video cover letters are a growing trend. Should you use one as part of your job hunting?

 

Summary

The question is – – should I use a video cover letter to stand out?

Like many things, the answer may be yes or no… I don’t have enough information in your case to go hard and fast rule but let me summarize my thinking.

Most of you are not great actors or actresses. You think you are but most of you actually stink. Many years ago, when video, was a new phenomena, I received a video from a job hunter who read his resume in front of a blue backdrop.

It was the most boring treatise imaginable.

Most of you don’t talk to the camera well; you can read the speech but do you think that’s going to be exciting for someone? If you sat in the audience of the theater and someone read to you (I’m going to pick something up and read to you exactly is on the piece of paper and every once in a while looked up), is that interesting for you to listen to?No. Does any personality come through? No.

It really depends on who you are and how well you communicate.

There are many people that are sensational communicators; they have a lot of energy and passion; they can deliver a cover letter that speaks to the listener and grabs their attention. They have the ability to say, “This is how you describe the job and the experience that you’re looking for. This is what I have done.” They can do it so well that the phone will ring before the video is over.

Then there is most of you who will write a speech, you’ll tape it to your monitor, or you’ll be holding your phone there in front of you, and will be looking at the camera and then looking down at what you wrote, and look at the camera and what you wrote, and you’re going to be awful.

The right answer is going to be the one that is right for you; I don’t want to give a general rule but the reality is most people are atrocious in front of the camera because you’re not well practiced enough.

I’ve done more than 2000 YouTube videos; I host podcasts; I’m relatively glib. I spent most of my career as a headhunter where nothing is prepared in advance and every conversation is different.

Most of you don’t have that kind of experience and, if you do, have not learned how to translate that experience to be in front of the camera. The result is you are far better writing than you are in person.

That’s the general statement. Now, let me add an extra layer.

Unfortunately, in this world, there was a lot of discrimination. By letting someone see you, you open yourself up to it and to mockery.

You can mark before wearing this coach hat and that’s fine but if you’re out there looking for a job and someone is watching your video and says, “was with that Coach hat he’s wearing,” or, “was with that shirt he’s got on,” or, “she comes across like an idiot,” they are not evaluating for who you are and what you know, they are distracted by something. That’s my other reluctance.

Unless you have a great delivery that is completely captivated, you expose yourself on the basis of bias to unnecessary rejection.

As a result, using a video cover letter can work or not work; you have to know yourself well enough to answer whether it can work for you.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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