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I’m Pending for a Job. Can I Send The Mgr a LinkedIn Connection Request?

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a subscribers question. The subscriber asks, “I’m pending for a job with a company. Can I send the hiring manager a LinkedIn connection request? “

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at [email protected]

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

Ask The Big Game Hunter: On the Outside Looking In?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter he answers a viewer’s question about what she should do while working in a bad environment.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at [email protected]

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

Ask The Big Game Hunter: What Goes Into. Programmer’s Cover Letter?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what should go into any cover letter and how to format it, not just simply the original question and then I tack on a bonus.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Trying to hire someone? Email me at [email protected]

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

Ask The Big Game Hunter: First Job. Changing Jobs Again Quickly. (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question he received on quota.com about changing jobs quickly after taking your first position.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Wrestling to Find Enough Leads?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter response to a question one of his listeners has with advice for help to get more job leads for his job search.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at the Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit my website, http://www.TheBigGameHunter.us to sign up for a complimentary subscription to No B.S. Job Search Advice Ezine, pay what you want for my books and guides to job hunting and watch hundreds of other videos about job hunting and hiring.

Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Listen to Job Search Radio, No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio and No B. S. Hiring Advice Radio in iTunes and other podcast directories and apps.

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Trying to hire someone? Email me at [email protected]

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Returning to the United States

“Q. I am thinking of coming back to US after working in Dubai for 17 years, which is five years more than I worked in US.

Is this a handicap? A managing director friend of mine still hasn’t found a job a year later after coming back to DC.

How do you suggest I test the waters? I just spent three weeks in eastern US and I think I would love to come back.

Answer:

Yes, it is a handicap. There is much more effort hiring people abroad than there is someone in their local geographic area, especially given that firms have choices.

They also may not know “The brand” of the firm you worked for. They may have a good association for people working for a particular local firm and have no opinion other than judgement based upon bigotry for the firm you work for (Overseas firms do not do things “like we do.”

Lastly, there are times of the year where senior professionals are more likely to find work than others. Generally, it is the end of the third quarter through the early part of the first quarter. We have almost completed that cycle.

>How do you suggest I test the waters? I just spent three weeks in eastern US (yes coinciding with Sandy) and I think I would love to come back.

OPINION. 

(1) Start networking on LinkedIn with people you know who are stateside and who know and like your work.

(2) Use the holiday times to re-connect with people, you have not spoken with in a long time to let them know how you are, what you are doing and what you are thinking of doing.Drop these same people notes every three months from here on out.

(3) Put your Skype ID on resumes as well as time zone differences to where you are

(4) Look at your job search as a marathon and not a sprint. It will take determination to get back to the US. DO NOT QUIT ON YOURSELF.

Those are the starting places. The rest involves hard work, networking and effort.

© 2012 all rights reserved.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Competing Against Younger Workers

Hey, Jeff, how about the topic of 48 year olds trying to compete with 28 and 38 year olds  for a topic?  It is what I have been going through in my job search for the past 2 1/2 years here in xxxx. I have no problem getting interviews and have been told by many people that I interview very well.  But then they always hire someone 10 years and sometimes even 20 years younger.

At the time I write this, I am 61 years old. I compete every second of the day against younger workers in my office (and older ones as well) and in other recruiting firm’s offices.

I always find this a tricky subject because although age bias is rampant in our culture (if you don’t believe me, watch tv advertising critically and see who it is geared toward), it is often not as rampant as people believe it is in the job market.

You see, by the time someone is in their 40’s or 50’s, for example, they have far surpassed the job requirements of positions for which someone in their 20’s will be hired for.

If they are in technology fields, often the technology has changed two or three times since their 20’s and although someone =may be capable of managing someone who develops in the technology, that doesn’t make someone actually able to develop in it on a day to day basis.

So, although you may arrive at an interview ready and willing to do the job, you are competing against someone more able than you to do it . . . and willing to do it for a lot less money, too.

So in these cases, you really cannot compete with someone who can do the job better than you.

However, if you are competing with others with similar or identical skills and coming in second or not being invited back for second interviews, there are some things to be aware of that you can improve upon.

1. Even though you are being told you’re interviewing well, you aren’t.

Feedback that is passed on often isn’t truthful because firms don’t want to be sued and recruiters don’t want to explain themselves further. It is easier to be dishonest than engage a candidate with the hard truth. Push to get more detailed feedback than you were “too light.”

2. You haven’t made them comfortable enough that you will fit into the group

This is the one that people confuse with age bias. Let’s assume that you are my age interviewing with a 32 year old. The group consists of 26 and 27 year olds. In other words, you are the age of a grandparent and they are interviewing you for a job working at the same level as a 27 year old.

#1. You need to demonstrate identical skills competence as a 27 year old competing for the job and

#2. You need to confront the potential for ageism by using your experience as an advantage for you.

How?

There will be some point in the interview where you can go off scripted questions and, if there isn’t an obvious point, at the point where the interview is about to end, before they are about to conclude it, ask them, “Before we conclude, may I make a point or offer some information to you?”

“Sure.”

Use your own language to convey this message. you don’t have to use my words.

“Although we and your team might be of different generations, I want to make it clear that I am interested in doing this job, fitting into your group (company, organization, team), doing a great job and helping you look good to management.

“Where some on the team will buck to earn more money than your firm is willing to pay or advance to a job like yours even if it means moving to another firm to get it, I want to join, learn and do a great job here and not use it as a stepping stone to advancement. Frankly, I’ve been there and done that and I like this a whole lot more.”

“I also may have some experience that can be useful to help mentor and coach your group and can be helpful to you at times. But I want to assure you that I won’t second guess decisions you make with the team. I’m here to support you with doing (whatever the job is).”

“So, if you decide that I am someone who can do this job well, and certainly, this seems like a great job to me, I just ask you to rest assured tat I will be excited to join you.”

3. You convey “the know-it-all syndrome”

Sometimes, people with significant experience have a way of carrying themselves as being so confident or self assured that it crosses the line into arrogance. They tell interviewers that they have done this job before and it would be a snap! A breeze! Easy!

You haven’t done the job before for them in this organization and for these folks. You’ve heard of “The Easy Button?” Try “The Humble Button.”

Again, age discrimination is common but often people over use this as an excuse for why they are rejected from a job. And where it may exist, there are ways to position yourself as a humble servant that will make them realize what a treasure you would be if they hired you.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2012

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Re-Launching Your Career

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a subscriber about how to relaunched his career after having had a string of short-term jobs.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at the Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit my website, http://www.TheBigGameHunter.us to sign up for a complimentary subscription to No B.S. Job Search Advice Ezine, pay what you want for my books and guides to job hunting and wants hundreds of other videos about job hunting and hiring.

Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Listen to Job Search Radio, No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio and No B. S. Hiring Advice Radio in iTunes and other podcast directories and apps.

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

Ask The Big Game Hunter: How Should I Send My Cover Letter?

A. Implied in your question is that you have attached your cover letter to your email as a separate file just as you did your resume. If you do that, I can give you no advice about how to get it read because, frankly, I refuse to read a second attachment and go right to the file that suggests it is the resume.

Even if I make a mistake and open the wrong file, I immediately close it and go to the next one–the resume file.

BTW, don’t enclose a file that suggests that it is a reference list and send it to a 3rd party recruiters; your references will not be called except to source for job leads or late in the search when they are legitimately needed for references. Why risk annoying a reference?

Instead of emailing a separate file, use the message area of the email that you are attaching your resume to send a cover letter. Most people I know do read those so you can get your message across there.

© 2010 all rights reserved.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Can No LinkedIn Profile Be a Problem?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether the lack of a LinkedIn profile Can cost someone an opportunity at a company.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at [email protected]

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.