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The Salary Negotiation Mistake of Acting from Impatience and Anxiety

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake of anxiety and impatience and how to overcome them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

They Are Watching You (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you of all the people that are evaluating you when you interview for a job.

Summary

Today, let's talk about 1 of the most underappreciated, under reminded about tips I can give you about job hunting.  There was a song many years ago with the refrain, "I'll be watching you."  On an interview, it is not just the interviewer who is watching you.  Every person that you meet, even for a moment, is taking note of you and having an impression of you.

That can be the security guard in the visit in the building that you will be visiting.  That can be the receptionist on the floor that is buzzing you in.  Very truly and confidently speaking to her with a smile on your face, "Hi! My name is so-and-so.  I have a 2:30 appointment to meet such and such person."

"Great. But you have a seat."

"Terrific. Happy to do it."

Then, sit facing the greatest number of entry points to the room so that you can see someone approaching you.

With the interviewer, as well, who may take you around the floor. Later, or introduce you to other people.

The tower seriously doesn't serve you.  What will serve you, at least in the United States, is a friendly, affable smile, a great handshake, a confident demeanor about you – – these go a long way toward letting people like you.

People get hired for a number of reasons.  Hopefully, 1 of them is that you are  competent enough to do the job.  Then, there are the tiebreakers.  Among the tiebreakers are:

Do I think I can work with this person?

Do I like this person?  Often, this is the 1st question the hiring manager may ask subordinates.  Do you like them? What do you like about them?  Things along these lines can be the tiebreaker between you and another person.

Again, remember, everyone is watching you.  Everyone is noticing you.  Everyone is commenting about you if they meet you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Is It OK to Take a Counteroffer in This Case? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is OK to accept a counteroffer.

Is it OK to accept a counteroffer in this case?

Summary

Here is 1 of those questions I was asked on quora and I want to help sort this out for someone.

Here is the scenario. A person has been working in a job that he or she really likes. He gets a call from someone that he interviewed with. Several years ago. In the call, the person is offered a 45% increase in salary. They don't feel underpaid about the amount of the increase was so significant that they had to consider it. When they gave notice, the boss countered with a proposal that exceeded the increase the other firm had made and saying that it would change nothing in their relationship. There will be no ill will or anything like that.

The boss said that the salary gap was big enough that he couldn't blame me. He would have done the same thing in my shoes.  They had a candid conversation and the person writes, "I would love to stay in my current job with this new salary. I know for sure I will be much happier at my current company. Then with the new one   But the advice is usually to never ever take a counteroffer.  I am wondering if this should be 1 of those exceptions."

I want to start by saying that there are no rules except the ones that you want to engage with.

So, don't look to the outside for the rule; just look for what feels right.

I don't know if there will be an impact on you by staying; that's usually what most of the caution is about.

The cautions usually say "You are getting your next raise in advance. They're going to hold it over you. After all, when it comes time for promotion, are they going to reward you or the loyal person who hasn't made waves?" That is the standard advice.

When I hear about a 45% raise, I tend to think of an individual with a lower salary. So it's not like you're making $240,000 per year and being offered a 45% increase. The probability is that you are a lower wage relatively new person in the workforce for whom (I don't know what your real numbers are because you don't really speak about them)-- let's say you're a $40,000 per year person getting a 45% raise-- you are still under $60,000. That's chump change to a firm.

Don't be concerned about percentages. Even though everyone is throwing that percentage in your face , and I know will make a difference, but at the end of the day, it still translates into, "you are not making a lot of money and you have been underpaid for a long time."

The real thing is can you trust your boss. I know from experience that if I feel blackmailed to do something and there is a bad day, the 1st thing I would do is say, "I can't believe I gave this person 45% more and they are still working like crap for me!"

Again, it's an emotional response. I'm not criticizing your boss. I just know that at that moment he was trying to sell you on staying with their firm. Just consider that they have good intentions and, like an abusive spouse, may not be able to fulfill them in their entirety.

At the end of the day I have to say trust your gut.

It is really the best advice someone can give you. After all, you know the people that are involved.

The only question I would have for you is if your value was so much higher than what you are being paid previously, why were you underpaid for so long? Why did your current firm take advantage of you?

Once you have that answer for yourself, I think you know what decision to make.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What to Do if You Take a Counteroffer (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you should do if you accept a counteroffer.

Summary

If you decide it is in your interest to accept the counteroffer and you did accept the offer from the firm or, even if you didn't accept it yet and received the counteroffer decided to stay, the right thing to do is to offer apologies, appreciation to them say something to the effect of, "Thank you so much for all the time you put into interviewing and assessing me, this is a great opportunity. This is not the right time for me to accept it."

"BUT WHY?"

You will politely explain. From there, once you're done explaining, say, "Look, I understand you might be quite short. I want to offer you a few recommendations of people who might be able to do this role for you." Then give them referrals of people.

Do this with recruiters. If you're working through recruiter for this job. Don't give the referral directly to the company. Give it to the recruiter. After all, the only reason you got that company is through the recruiter. Let them make a living, right? They lost the fee because you made this decision. Replace the fee for them. Don't give it directly to the employer.

If you had the interview directly with the employer because you post a resume, they contacted you or you apply to an applicant tracking system or through networking, give the referral directly to them.

At the end of the day, I apologize, thank them profusely and offer referrals to fill the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

Two Second Interview Tricks | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 916 Here I discuss two second interview tricks that will help you bond with people you meet with.

Summary

I have to tricks for 2nd interviews that I think will help you stand out from other people and help build connections on the interview. On previous shows, I spoke about how important is to appear congruent with what you set your 1st interview. That is, if you talked about something at your 1st interview, you want to be consistent with what you say about it at the 2nd interview, right? Otherwise, it makes them scratch their heads and wonder, "Okay. Are they being truthful?"

Here's a little trick. You always want them thinking as though you are part of the team. You always want them thinking that you are 1 of the folks.

Let's say, you're coming back to interview and meeting with someone, you've already spoken with. Maybe was a phone interview. Maybe they were part of the set up before the next group of people. As you speak with them this time, here is what you say, "I was thinking about our last conversation. You spoke about such and such. I was really getting excited about. My mind is been racing about that since we spoke last time and I was wondering if you would tell me a little bit more about that and how I may contribute to this." You just try to get them to talk more because, if you see 1 of my other videos called, "The Headhunter Secret to Knowing If You Did Well on Interviews," the idea is that the more they talk, the more they like you.

It's like you are allowing them to be magnificent and you are just basking in their magnificence and listing adoringly what they say. Always get them to talk by saying, "You know, I was thinking about that last conversation we had it not been thinking about since the time my mind really hasn't stopped mulling that over. Would you tell me a little bit more about that please because it is really very exciting to me?" That's one little trick. Getting them to talk.

The other one I want to bring to your attention today is the, "referring to the other person conversation." Let's say you're speaking to John, Phil, Brenda, whomever in the 1st conversation and there was a point that was made that stuck in your mind. Your meeting with someone new. You say to them, "I was speaking with Brenda last time and she was talking about such and such. It was really very interesting to me. Would you give me your take on that, please. Do you see it the same way she? It was really very exciting."

The idea is that by referencing a person that you spoke with before, you get an idea as to whether they are being congruent, right? For example, if last time you spoke to subordinate and now you're speaking with an overall manager or director or VP, you are getting their take on the role. The ideas always reference something from the previous conversation.

Again, the key piece on this from your standpoint, whatever you reference has to be accurate. You can't just make stuff up because otherwise the scratch their heads and just reject you, assuming that you can be accurate, then referencing the conversation that you had with Brenda asking for their take on it, but some of the position of imagining you in the role, expanding upon what you been told, talking in ways that allow you to see that they are consistent with their thinking because the last thing you want to do is to step into a situation where there is conflict about what your role is going to be and how they are going to measure success.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

The Tournament Brainteaser

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: The Tournament Brainteaser (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers the two answers to this puzzle.

Summary

Guess what? I got another brainteaser for you! Here's the problem. Ready?

You got 5623 participants in a tournament. How many games would be needed in order to determine a winner?

Actually, there are 2 ways to answer this. I will start with the classic and then go to the other one.

In the classic, what you're doing is dividing this number in half each time. In the 1st round, there are 2811 games; one person has a b. The next round is 1406 games. In , the onethis round, the person who has the bye in the previous round is included.

Then, the next round has 703 games, the next round has 351 games. Any remainder has a bye and is included in the next round. So that's one way to answer it. Here's the fun one.

The idea is not to exclude this answer, but to included as part of your answer.

You can also say, "if all 5623 people competed one round you can have a winner from that one round." Got that? In this case were not talking about pairings were talking about a way that will 5623 people are competing with one another." and thus theoretically one person could be the winner.

Think of it like a lottery with 5623 people and there is only one winner. We don't know what the game is;, we just know that there could be a game where there could be one winner.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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