A Few Points About Your Interview Goals

A Few Points About Your Interview Goals | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 669 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers reminders to you about your goals and objectives when you interview.

 

Summary

When you interview, whether it is a 1st or 14th interview, there is one basic goal that you have and that is to demonstrate the fit for what they are looking for and how you can deliver what they want from you.

But you need to extract information from them, too. You also need to take time before your interview to prepare questions for them other than, "Tell me about the job." You can't go into so much depth that you will make them feel like they're going through an inquisition. However, there are some things that you can ask along the way that will probe a little bit and is not designed to create an impression.

For example, if you understand my philosophy of interviewing, I have what I call, "The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview," that you asked before the interview really starts. There is a YouTube video by that title that you can watch.

I have another video that copes with the fact that when they ask you, "Do you have any questions for us," they already answered that at the beginning of the interview. Thus, I have another video that deals with questions that you can ask at the end to replace, "Tell me about the job."

I also want you to go open further. "What's your background? What was your experience like before you join this firm?"

"What does success look like for you from me?" That's a variation on the 2 previous questions I'm I would've asked before hand.

You want to have a list, just 3 or 4 questions in order to cover points. None of them should be about benefits. It will cover benefits of the time that you get the offer; at that point, you can ask them about their insurance coverage. For now, all insurance has to meet the minimum requirements of the Affordable Care Act. It is no longer a big complicated thing.

On benefits, which you really should care about or the ancillaries; do they pay a bonus; do they have a 401(k) plan and what kind of match do they offer. Things along those lines that can differ from firm to firm.

Ultimately, your game plan at the time of this interview is to create a great impression, leave them with ideas about you that are consistent with what your objectives are. Just to be clear, when you go into that interview and ask yourself, "what message do I want to communicate to them about my about me that will allow them to know that I am qualified for this role and I would be a great fit.

Conversely, you have to extract certain things from them that will allow them to know that you are evaluating them, too. Your questions have to be reasonable.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

A Great Interview Question for Employers to Ask (VIDEO)


Here I offer up a great question for employers to ask that is very revealing about the job applicant, particularly executive candidates.

 

Summary

This is a video geared toward employers, rather than job hunters. The short version of the question is, you are an employer, and are interviewing someone. You want to get a sense of their preparedness. After you been talking with them for a little while and discuss some of the pleasantries, ask them this question, "How did you prepare for this interview?"

It's a very simple question that reveals a lot. There's a difference in the answer of, "I went to a Wikipedia page. Then I went to the company's website and read that." That is one level of answer.

The more senior someone is, the more depth I want you to expect of them. For example, from a factual perspective, you might hear them start by saying, "Well, I did a review of the company website and did a Google search to get a sense of how the business was doing and the challenges that it was facing. I found several articles were really quite interesting. Then I went to your LinkedIn profile discovered that we were 3rd level connections so I can see all that much. But then I used the chrome extension called Prophet that I use for. circumstances like this so I can look at your background in greater detail. What that allowed me to do beyond simply look at your LinkedIn public profile, was that your email address, phone numbers, see where you are on social media and then visit some of the other places. I don't want to say I was stalking you

I don’t want to say I was stalking you, but I started following you to get more holistic picture of you in your work.”

This answer’s a little bit different than the, “I looked at your Wikipedia page,” answer. That’s one level of an answer.

You may have noticed that as I offered the more in-depth answer, you want to listen for not just the depth but the excitement as they speak. If you listen to someone who speaks in a flat way as they say, “Well, I went to the company website,” that is one level of response.

However, if they talk with enthusiasm and passion, with a twinkle in her eyes that you can detect whether it is in person or over the phone, their answer may not be as in-depth as I offered up but the more you hear the excitement in their voice, isn’t that more likely to be the better individual for you to consider hiring?

They are more mature individual, more self-confident, show more self-assurance, more willing to expose themselves and demonstrate the effort that went into it versus that voice that almost seems disinterested when they say, “Well, I went to the company website. Look to your LinkedIn page…” That is a lot different in answer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Theater of Interviewing

The Theater of Interviewing

“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts . . . “

                                                                                                                                                          ~William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”

 

If Shakespeare is correct (which I believe he is), we have too many lazy actors arriving on stage for job interviews. It defies logic that they have neither rehearsed, not memorized their lines and are ill-prepared for their performance.

Let me ask you this– If you went to a movie and all that was put on the screen were out takes from filming, would you annoyed to have spent money and time watching them for 90 minutes or more? If you went to a theater performance and saw the cast perform, “As You Like It” without having re-read, let alone memorized their lines since they were cast for the part, would you be angry? Of course, you would! And you would be right. After all, you were being taken advantage of. You would probably;y go on social media and complain about wasting your money on a garbage performance from a group of actors who did not show care.

And when most job hunters go on an interview (or have a phone interview), they are as well prepared as most 6 graders are if they were about to step into a college class.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2017   

   

Continued

 

  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com helps you be more successful faster in your job search with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How Do You Use LinkedIn? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 668 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to go beyond the obvious answer to the more subtle and powerful one.

 

Summary

Let's talk about 1 of those great tough interview questions that becomes very revealing. I heard this question last week and was stunned when I heard it. The question is, "How do you use LinkedIn?"

The obvious answer isn't the right answer but you want to acknowledge it. The obvious answer is, "I have a profile on LinkedIn and have used it in a way that allowed your firm to find me (or the recruiter who found me to refer me to you)." Part of this becomes building reputation and brand. But the best answer takes this part and goes a completely different route.

"But the other thing that I do (and this is where the best answer goes to) is use it as an intelligence resource. For example, on a project I did 2 years ago (or on a task I had assigned to be 2 years ago), where I didn't really know much about what I was being asked to do, I was able to use my network, not just simply for my 1st level connections, but to use an introduction from my 1st level connection to 3 people who let me do some research with them and pick their brain and the shortcut the amount of time that was spent on this project. From what could've been 2 weeks to 2 days. So, I use it as an information resource that helps me in my work day in and day out."

So what I've done is acknowledge the obvious answer, but you also go into greater depth and talk about how you actually use it for intelligence. By the way, if you're not using it this way, you really should be.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

Looking for Remote Work? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter discusses something you should not be doing when you are looking for a job where you can work remote or telecommute.

Summary

Again, we continue coping with the fact that my main computer is down and that I cannot do transcription right now.

People apply for jobs that do not advertise themselves as offering remote work. Why are you applying for those positions? Don't you think that that if remote work was available it would be advertised?

All you are doing is wasting someone's time.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Give Yourself an Advantage on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE EZINE IS NOW, “NO BS COACHING ADVICE.”


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an easy to follow strategy to help you stand out from the pack on LinkedIn.

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about this simple strategy to stand out from people on LinkedIn.

The hard thing to do on LinkedIn is differentiating yourself from others. There are so many hundreds of millions of people on LinkedIn right now. With so many recruiters both agency and corporate recruiters searching, they are going to LinkedIn to find talent. How do you stand out?

Obviously, you have to write a great profile; I'm not going to talk with you about that today. I'm going to talk with you about using the feature that will help you look good when someone finds your profile. The feature that I'm referring to is endorsements.

Endorsements are different than the testimonials that have been around for years. Testimonials of those long, long descriptions of how wonderful human being you are, written by someone who knows you very well. They are like LinkedIn's version of a traditional reference. If you have someone write a testimonial for you . Who doesn't know you very well, it stinks. You don't want to have anyone right one for you. Who doesn't know your work very well.

Endorsements, on the other hand, is a function where you or they can select the option that you possess that they believe you should be endorsed for. All they have to do is click the checkbox. What is the impression is created if someone has no endorsements? What is the impression created if someone has 150 endorsements? Or 500+ endorsements? Or lots and lots of endorsements for different attributes?

If you go to my LinkedIn profile, you can search for my name (the headline under my name now says, "Helping People and Companies Play Big! Let Me Coach You."), What you will see is a whole bunch of endorsements of people and given to me.

I know recruiters aren't thought very highly of and I did that kind of work for more than 40 years. When you see someone like me with lots and lots of endorsements, that is unusual. Don't you think I wanted more me than someone who might have no endorsements? Or 2? Or 12? Of course you do.

Both with my brand, The Big Game Hunter, and with strategic use of endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn and on my website.

What you want to be doing is asking people who you are connected to, you know you professionally and personally, to endorse you for something that you do or have done and have strong skills. You do this not once or twice but repeatedly, particularly when you're not actively looking for work, will cause you to stand out.

The truth is you want people to be reaching out to you, not when you are looking for a job, desperate, out of work and looking for work. You want people reaching out to you when you are a "happy camper."

Why do I say that? It's really simple. Employers have a bias toward people who are working and who they perceive are not actively looking for work. That bias causes them to value those people at a higher level than the person that they find the job board. Third-party recruiters think the same thing, too. It's amazing! I could go into detail about why it's ridiculous, but, the long and the short of it is, what you want to do is be found. You want to be found by organizations there looking on LinkedIn and thinking that you are not someone who is actively looking for work and thought a very highly. That "thought a very highly part" comes from endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn.

So, if you have friends, if you are connected to people who are willing to do you a favor, ask them to endorse you, not write a testimonial for you. You will start noticing that the number of people reaching out to you to connect will start to take off.

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE ZINE IS NOW, "NO BS COACHING ADVICE."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How Long Does It Take to Screen Resumes? (VIDEO)


Someone from a smaller firm asks how long it takes to screen resumes because they think they are spending too much money for an external recruiter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Using a Proper Handshake or Bow | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 667 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of using correct body language at the beginning of your interview. 

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about body language and is very simple piece of body language that some people in the US get tripped up with. I've spoken about the smile; I spoke about the positioning of yourself in the interview chair during an interview. Today, I want to remind you about "that handshake."

If you are US-born, you understand that a handshake is firm and you maintain eye contact while shaking hands. If you are from other cultures, that might be considered rude. But, if you are interviewing in the US, that is the appropriate thing to do. So, I want to encourage you to practice the proper handshake. If you are not US-born.

And, if you are US-born interviewing outside of the United States, remember, culturally, it may be different. You may not be interviewing with an ex-pat working abroad; you may be interviewing with someone local who is used to a milder handshake..

In some cultures, the appropriate thing is not a handshake – – it is a bow. If you are US-born, you have no experience with this; is the equivalent of someone being foreign-born and shaking hands in the US. You have to learn how to bow. I can't do that because different cultures will bow differently.

Wherever you are, if you are interview with someone expecting a bow, because you're interviewing in a foreign country (that is, outside of the United States), you will have to go to someone to practice with. This is an example of 1 of those "practice ahead of the interview kind of things" that I talk about with regularity. Being rude and not bowing, being rude and not shaking hands properly will hurt you in the interview because it will temporarily distract the interviewer from paying attention to who you are and what you can get them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

4 0 GPA and No Interviews


“I have a 4.0 GPA and have yet to get an interview. What the heck is wrong?”

 

Summary

Someone wrote to me complaining that they have a 4.0 GPA and have gotten no interviews. Obviously, they are annoyed and frustrated and wondering what is going wrong.

Here's my answer: right now, you are fixated on the 4.0 GPA… That's great. Right now, I don't know what school you went to. There is a difference between a 4.0 GPA from Stanford and a 4.0 GPA from school no one is ever heard of before.

Let's assume it was a good school and concede that point. I don't know anything else about what you did while you were in school because you are fixated on the GPA. Firms care about whether you had an internship that related to your degree. Whether you work in a part-time job. What kind of jobs are you applying for? If you are applying for jobs that require 5 years of experience or positions where you will be managing people. . . You are not qualified for those positions.

There is more than the GPA that is at play here. Without my going into, "You should pay your dues and work your way up," I am not going to give that speech. You need to start talking to people who are already working who you know to see what is wrong. What are you doing wrong in marketing yourself that is standing in the way of you getting a job.

Now, that may seem frustrating. "Why do I have to do that?" What you are doing isn't working. You have to adapt. The world is not waiting for another 4.0 GPA. Unless the 4.0 GPA has done something that matters to them.

I don't know if you have a 4.0 GPA with a major in history and applying for IT positions for which you are not qualified. I could go on and on but the fact is you announcing that you have a 4.0 GPA doesn't tell me anything that's useful and you are probably sabotaging your own job search. Talk to people locally who you know. Talk to friends who have already landed. Talk to your parents. Talk to your college advisor. Be prepared to show them your resume and talk with them about what you are doing wrong and be prepared to talk about what you should be doing differently.

My site, JobSearchCoachingHQ. com can help you a lot. I hope you find it helpful.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

No BS Coaching Advice Ezine January 17 2017

The January 17 2017 issue of No BS Coaching Advice Ezine 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

 

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