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What Makes You One of the Best?

What Makes You One of the Best? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 641 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this Pressure interview question, “What makes you one of the best?” 

Summary

Last week, I did a video for employers with an interview technique that I have seen many firms use over the course of time where they try to put people on the defensive by asking, "What makes you think you're 1 of the best? Why are you 1 of the best people at what you do?"

That's the advertising, the promotion, that's where the early questions. Here is where becomes particularly tricky. The correct response for a candidate is to talk about what you've done that demonstrates that you are strong. Their response is to say, "That doesn't sound like so much." What they are really looking for you to do is defend yourself because people who have self-confidence and determination and are high performers can answer that question succinctly, to the point and when challenged, they fight for. They don't just simply say, "Oh. Okay."

The classic example is with the salesperson. "What makes you a top performer?"

"Well, I'm a top to performer my current firm. I had among the top sales numbers for…"

"That doesn't sound like such a big deal."

"What! Then you would fight by demonstrating what you've done that stands out from the other salespeople at your firm," instead of saying, "Oh. Okay."

Answering, "Oh. Okay," in response to the question, "What makes you 1 of the best," being dismissed by the employer and accepting that isn't the mark of the top achiever. Top achievers know that they are top achievers. They defend themselves when they are questioned. They battle. They fight. Take care. Just saying, "Oh. Okay," isn't the benchmark of a top performer.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Resume Mistakes

Stupid Resume Mistakes | Job Search Radio

Ep. 224 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another stupid resume mistake that too many job hunters commit.

Summary

This is 1 of my favorite mistakes people make-- including an objective.

Objectives are a residue from 40 some odd years ago when it was too complicated to type a cover letter.. Why? Because back then, you type in a typewriter, if you made a mistake you used white out (a product that many of you will think, "Huh?? What's that? .. It was a liquid that was designed to allow you to cover up mistakes she could type over them again). It looked real good. When you send a resume (please note losing sarcasm). Copying was not as ubiquitous as it is now. It was expensive to have your cover letter copied. As a result, people opted for an objective on the resume to talk about what they wanted to do for the next organization.

Let's fast-forward to today. The outcome of an objective is to accomplish the same thing. However, when you read them, they say 1 of 2 things – – they are bland and boring. They will say something like, "I want to work for a progressive organization where I can use my talents and grow... On and on and on. The 2nd way they are used makes them very limited. "I am looking for (they describe something very limiting and very specific). As a result, they really had and toss your resume out or deleted because you disqualified yourself because what you described tells them that you would not be interested in the role that they have.

Ditch the objective. Just don't use it. It is a waste of time. It will only hurt you. And accomplishes nothing positive.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter?

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter? (VIDEO)


I’m concerned that my contacts will be harassed by recruiters if I accept a connection request from a recruiter.

 

Summary

This is a job search question that someone asked me that I thought would be a good one to answer. Most people tend to think of answering this in the "old way." The old way is it relevant anymore.

The old way is, "Do I need to worry about my contacts being hassled or harassed. If I accept the connection request from a recruiter?"

In the old way of thinking of things, if you accept the connection request from a recruiter, you would be inundated with connection requests that asked, "Would you introduce me to so-and-so. I would like to speak with them about a job." Maybe, you would be asked, "Do you think they would be interested in land in the Poconos?" All sorts of nonsense.

It isn't that way anymore because recruiters, salespeople, business executives don't need introductions to get contact information from LinkedIn. Putting aside the premium accounts for 2nd, there are Google chrome extensions that, as long as you are on a page for someone will reveal, generally very accurately, the email address for person and sometimes the phone number. Thus, if they want to reach out to someone, they can reach out by email to them as long as they are a 1st, 2nd, 3rd level connection with them or in a group with them.

For someone like me with 17,000+1st level connections, I can reach a hell of a lot of people in the US with that in a hell will want in a lot of other countries, too, because those chrome extensions are really quite good. In addition, for those of you who don't want to go through LinkedIn, there are Google custom search engines like www.LI-USA.info that searches all the LinkedIn public profiles in the United States. Once you have the profile up on your screen, you can use the chrome extension to get an email address. Thus, there's really no reason to worry about it.

What are the chrome extensions? My favorite one is candidate.ai (NOTE: They may be shutting down the extension shortly). Then, there is Prophet

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL!

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Makes You Think You Are The Most Qualified Person for this Job?

What Makes You Think You’re the Most Qualified Person for This Job? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 640 Here I answer one of the more obnoxious questions asked on an interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Great Cover Letters (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter Offers two different approaches to writing effective cover letters.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you about cover letters today because cover letters are 1 of those things are an afterthought in most people's repertoire and, frankly, they are the "grabber" of your speech.

Do you know what I mean by a grabber? If you are at a function where someone is going to give a formal speech, often, they are going to try to grab your attention, tell you a story, tell you a joke, tell you something that's designed to get your attention. A cover letter is really like that.

When I start off in recruiting in days of old, a cover letter was actually a cover letter. It was attached on top of your resume and mail to the recipient. I know it's hard to imagine people actually did that but they did. Today, were actually talking about a "cover email" but still: a cover letter. It is really the thing that should grab someone's attention.

How do you do that? How do you get someone to actually open that attachment and pay attention to your resume? The easiest way to do it is if you have someone who referred you to this individual. So, in that case, you would lead off with that right away. However, if you don't have someone you can point to (I am referred to you by Ramesh Patel. He told me were trying to hire someone for this role), what can you do?

There are 2 schools of thought to this. One is to be relatively brief and to the point. "I saw your position on such and such site. I noted that required experience with such and such things. I have more than 6 years of experience with each of those skills." Then he would talk about your role, responsibilities and accomplishments in a relatively brief manner. From there you would conclude by saying, "I hope to hear from you in the next few days about scheduling an interview or, barring that, I will call you with the early part of next week to chat."

The 2nd one which I think is very interesting is doing what I call it point by point. You have seen a job listing so you would copy and paste it into your cover email. "I saw your position on such and such site requiring this background. Here's what you do next. Next to each of the skills required for the position, you would write down how long and how recently you had worked with each. Using technology as an example, if they are listing J2EE background, "we are looking for someone with 5 years of J2EE experience plus 5 years of such and such and 6 years of such and such," next to each item you would indicate how long and how recently you work with each. See might write, "7 years of J2EE as recently as last week."

Next to the next requirement, you might write, "3 years of experience as recently as 6 months ago." Continue by going item by item with the job requirements and list how long and how recently you worked with each. From there, you might list the functionality of the position (each of the things that they would want you to do) and do the same thing next to each. This makes it very easy for them to see what the fit is like.

From there, you would wrap it up by saying, "I hope to hear from you soon about scheduling the interview. Barring that, I will call you later this week or early part of the next."

That makes it a very effective cover letter because you make it very obvious to them in the cover letter. Then you back it up with a resume that you have attached your cover email that, again, demonstrates the fit however, if your resume doesn't support what you said in your cover letter, they will start to scratch their head and asked themselves, "What gives here?"

Thus you have to tailor your resume to confirm what you told them in the cover letter is accurate. Together, they become a very powerful presentation.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Casting Your Net in All The Wrong Places

Casting Your Net in All The Wrong Places (VIDEO)


So many people make this core networking mistake . . . it isn’t funny

 

Summary

I thought I would do a short video about what I call casting Internet in all the wrong places.

When people are networking, they are networking with people just like them. They are hoping to be introduced to people who play bigger, people at a higher level than them who make decisions. This is true in job hunting as well as in business. The result was that being that the people that you talk to aren't able to make a decision. In addition, often they don't know many people who are decision-makers outside of their own organization. So, what's the point?

If you been to a Chamber of Commerce meeting or to a business group, you run into this problem all the time. I'll even go so far as to say run into this with LinkedIn. With LinkedIn, I get tons of connection requests. Of the 17,000 or so people connected to me, I reached out to probably fewer than a thousand of them. They reached out to me because I have such a powerful brand – – The Big Game Hunter.

I understand that their version of networking is to gain access to my network, but they're not really contacting anyone there, and they aren't asking me to introduce them to anyone in my network, either. So, what's the point?

What's the point of speaking to people or reaching out to people who can't help you? What's the point of reaching out to people who won't help you. Because all they are doing is going, "Give me. Give me. Give me." And what's amazing is that you are back there saying and doing the same thing. "Give me. Give me. Give me I need. I need." Is not exactly a relationship that's going to work, is it?

After all, both of you are so busy grasping, "Please help me. I need your help, please. Help me!" It just doesn't work, does it? If it was working, you wouldn't be watching this video would you?

I want to encourage you to do something a little bit different. I would encourage you to help other people before you ask for help. This requires investment of time and trust on your part that if you give, you will receive. I know the business networking group, BNI, as this is the core philosophy of the group. I also know that in job search and other fields as well, it works, too.

I want to encourage you to think, not in terms of, "Give me. Give me. Give me." Instead, think in terms of giving first in order to receive.

Then, the next thing is to start operating at a higher level. Don't just reach out to people who are like you.

1. Think in terms of networking to a higher level where you can assist them. I know for myself. I met a lot of very successful people over the years and, at times, I've just offered a gift of advice 2 people who are struggling in some way at a certain stage of their life. They come back to me and allow me to be of service to them in their organization and thus have a written business many times over.

Again, if you are operating at your level. Often, you are not getting to people who write checks., You are getting to people who have to go hat in hand to present your case to someone. It reminds me of the situation where I was coaching someone recently. They are trying to build the business and they have to go to someone who has to be in contact with procurement. Invariably, procurement is going to say no. Why? Because that's the habit that they operate with.

"Fill out this form and make 47 different copies of it. Send it back to us and will get back to you in about a year."

What's the point of doing all of this? You have to get to real decision-makers and network your way to them.

Again, networking in the wrong places may feel good temporarily, but if you're not getting results, what's the point? Why are you engaged in that effort if the result is going to be just a bunch of people smiling, with drinks in their hand, all saying, "Do you know anyone? Okay." "Do you know anyone? Okay." "Do you know anyone? Okay." Doing that for an entire evening. UGH!

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

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For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

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What Makes You Think You Are The Most Qualified Person for This Job?

What Makes You Think You’re the Most Qualified Person | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Are you coming up short on your interviews? Do you know you’re stumbling on a question or two on every interview and winding up without a job offer?

Summary

Today, I'm going to ask most tough interview that organizations will ask on interviews. The question goes something like this, "So, why do you think you are the most qualified person. I have interviewed for this job?"

Oooooooooooooooooh! Don't they seem real serious about that one?

It's a ridiculous question; we both know that but it works. What happens is job applicants get nervous, they become anxious and begin to plead the case for themselves, fumble around with our answers, stammer and behave like I am now. That's not the right way to answer this question.

What you want to do instead is pause for a second, act like you're thinking about it, looked him square in the eye and say, "You know, I don't know if I'm the most qualified person that you've met with. But what I've done is . . . " Then, list 4 or 5 things that you have done that relate to what they are looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Seeming Desperate

Ep 639 There’s something about desperation that is a turn off.

 

Summary

I'm back with another piece of advice designed to help you find work more quickly. This is about 1 of those stupid interview mistakes the job hunters make all the time. That is, appearing desperate.

Have you ever been on a date with someone who seemed desperate? Women, come on! You can't tell me you haven't been on a date with someone who seemed desperate! They are just too… Fill in the blank. Too much. I want to presume to know how you feel when this happens. I just simply say that in situations where I've been out with desperate women, it is not been a pleasant experience.

Women who appear desperate come across, in the male vernacular, as stalkers. I suspect the same is true on the women's side..… And worse. Such behavior in dating doesn't work and it certainly doesn't work in job search.

When you go on the interview and you seem too eager, (I act the part in the audio to demonstrate how obnoxious it seems), The hiring manager eventually asked themselves, "What's with this person?" You can't appear too eager; it's okay to be accommodating. Your role is to relax and to deal with your potential future boss as a peer so that they understand, and you understand what you are capable of doing for them so that they can evaluate and assess you and see how you fit into their needs.

Acting like the obedient schoolchild, sitting in your chair, leaning forward (I haven't done that when you were a kid), just doesn't work. It doesn't make you more attractive than other people to your future boss. If anything, it makes you less appealing! That's because you seem like you are desperate. No one really likes desperate.

Relax. Follow my advice about the single best question you should ask on any interview. Talk with them as an equal,, and explain how your background, that which they are looking for. Do it with confidence and self assurance because part of your job on interview is to put their mind that these and demonstrate that you are the solution to a problem that they have. They need someone to do such and such. You want to talk about how you did for someone else before..

In joining them, you don't want to do this for the next 30 or 40 years of your life. You want to understand the upside for you. If the role, do you want to do the same thing for the next 3 or 40 years? Of course not!

You always want to make sure you ask questions about your potential future with the organization. If you don't like the answer, don't be a schmuck can take the job And then blame them for what's happening to you. It's your fault, then.

Again, don't beg. Don't appear desperate.All

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

JOIN AND RECEIVE A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Applicant Tracking System

Getting Prepared for The New Applicant Tracking System | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a new feature I love in applicant tracking systems that you need to be prepared for.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today and give you a heads up about a new variation of the applicant tracking system that you need to be prepared for. I was pretty interviewing a guest for my podcast and heals a service that attaches to the typical applicant tracking system. Here's what it does:

The employer provides questions for you to answer at the time of application and records it by video. Thus, you now need to be dressed for video at the time you apply. Why am I saying this? The service level let you go back if you don't complete the application. You are done. You are finished.

When you are applying now on applicant tracking systems, unless you know in advance that they are a video service, or they are going to ask with video of you answering questions, you now need to be dressed to apply for job in case this occurs.

There are different versions of the system. His is one that gives you 30 seconds to think of your answer before you apply. It's not just simply that your giving an answer to a question. They may never see it. Here's why.

They use big data analytics as part of their system and they are looking for how your answer matches up with the answers of people at their firm will ready that are successful in the job. Get that? They are using big data analytics, "listening" to your answer for words that you use and patterns of those words in your answers to determine whether or not your answer is similar to an answer of people within their firm will already. And, obviously, you want to have a picture of you without a shirt on? Or T-shirt that you sleep in as part of your answer?

What I'm encouraging you to do is to have a different mindset when you are applying for a job just because you never know whether or not a video is going to be taken. You never know whether this service is going to give you the 30 seconds or dive in and immediately answer their questions. You now need to be mentally prepared for an interview when you are using applicant tracking systems. Like I said, these services now attached to the old existing ones.

You need to now be mentally prepared to do Q&A for a video interview right then and there. When you are applying for something online. It also explains why I discourage job hunters from applying for jobs to applicant tracking systems. You will always be better off networking away to a hiring manager then going in the front door using the systems. As good as some of these new tools are, they are not perfect. Admittedly, employers and hiring managers are not perfect either, but who would you rather be talking to? Big brother or the actual manager?

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. SIGN UP FOR A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

No BS Coaching Advice

No BS Coaching Advice Ezine December 27 2016

The December 27 2016 issue of No BS Coaching Advice Ezine 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and  leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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