Have You Ever Done a Layoff? (VIDEO)


How did you do it? How did it feel?

Summary

This question comes out of, "The New York Times," an interview with Max Levchin who was a director with Yahoo, former CTO with PayPal, started Slide, help start Yelp and is now starting another firm.

He says he asks this question of senior professionals on his interviews. And, I think, it is a good question to be prepared for.

The question starts off by asking, "Have you ever done a layoff? What did you do? How did it feel?"

He isn't trying to find out whether you brought them into a conference room or not. He is looking for signs of emotional maturity or not. Especially for leadership, this is 1 of the key factors you want to demonstrate on an interview.

You start off your answer by "sinking" a little bit emotionally. "You know, I have done them. There is never an easy way to do it." You need to change your voice from sounding enthusiastic to serious, sad, and softer. You continue on by saying, "I brought individuals into her room and told them personally. From there I tried to help him find another position in trying to be of further help to them. I reached out to a number of my contacts and, where possible, handed them a slip of paper and said, 'Call this person. They may have something for you.'" If that is not you, don't say it. After all, the law I can get exposed.

You can continue on by saying, "What I did afterwards was really hard. As they were packing up, as they were saying their goodbyes, I help them. I help them from a place, not from trying to get them the heck out of here fast, but to talk with them one to one as a human being and be of assistance. There is no easy way to say goodbye to someone who has given their blood and guts to an organization, who has cared as much as some of these folks have and still do without being a human being and wanting to break down. So that's what I did. I hope I never have to do it again."

So, they are not looking for you to tell them that you brought a group of them into a conference room and announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, I have the…"Or anything like that. They are not looking to hear you talk about how you brought them into something like a union hall to announce mass layoffs. It is about what happened afterwards.

When you listen to the recording, I tried to emulate how I want you to demonstrate how you felt and how you would express it, how difficult it was for me just to say it and I had not experienced it like you might have (I have laid people off and, emotionally, tried to go back to that space and remember how it felt.).

Try to connect with that time that you did it and how hard it was, Continue on by talking about how you help them pack, talked to them individually and, where appropriate gave phone numbers, names and email addresses of people that they can reach out to you from your network … That will demonstrate that you have compassion for your employees, as well as care, and then you will win that interview question.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Happy New Year! The Plan for 2017

Happy New Year from me to you and my plan for next year.

Summary

Beginning on New Year's Day, I'm going to be recording the answers to tough obnoxious interview questions. Some are going to be harder than others. Some easier.

The idea is giving you a years worth of advice about how to answer some of those annoying obnoxious interview questions that are asked to job interviews.

I'm sure you're going to find it helpful, whether you are inexperienced, just entering the workforce, or you are a veteran individual and you have to go back out there and find the job.

I just want to wish you, "Happy New Year!"

I hope you don't need to stay with me the entire year but there is going to be an archive of shows available here and at my other website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us that you can reference.

At the end of the day, I just hope your job search is short and sweet, but if you need help, always remember www.JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and my ability to help you find work through that site.

Will be back tomorrow with the 1st of the tough interview.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

 

 

Going Pro (VIDEO)


Being a professional isn’t about the money. It’s about the attitude.

 

Summary

I want to ask you a question.

When a soldier is on the battlefield and they wake up one day and says to themselves, "I don't feel like doing that today," what do they do?

If a pro athlete wakes up one day and says to themselves, "I don't feel like practicing," what do they do?

I think you know the answer – – they do it anyway.

Why? Because it is needed. It is important. They get that message and sometimes have resistance to doing things and learn to do them anyway.

Whether it's a soldier on the battlefield or someone like Dwyane Wade, now the Chicago Bulls, formally of the Miami Heat, who has been a successful pro athlete for so many years, or Lebron or Eli or Peyton Manning or whoever the great athlete is, they practice anyway. They do what is needed, even though they don't feel like it.

What do you do when you wake up and say to yourself, "I don't feel like going to the gym today"or wake up and think, "I think I'll coast through my workday and do it at 50% of my ability." Do you tell management hold back on 50% of your pay for the day or you expect full money even though you may be doing the job at half effort?

Going Pro is a commitment to yourself. I want to repeat that to make sure you hear. Going Pro is a commitment to yourself that the lazy way, the halfway approach to things, giving 50% effort isn't going to get you to where you want to get to.

If you're thinking of starting a business and committing money to it and that money can be saying to you, "I'm not going to have a regular paycheck. I'm to be going in whole hog," or. "I'm going to give up my evenings and work at night so that my kids will have it easier, and I will be around more, " you could do it halfway but there's no point in that because you will fail.

Going Pro is a commitment to yourself and to those around you that you are "all in."

Not half effort.

All in.

Fully committed.

Dedicated to making something great happen.

Being successful at what you want to do.

Now, if you want to be a halfway performer, that is your prerogative but then you have to stop blaming others for why you are not successful because as is usually the case, you are the one that is holding yourself back.

Let me repeat that. For those of you who don't go "all in" you are the one holding yourself back and, given that you have these voices in your head that you think are yours but God put there by someone else at a certain stage in life that says, "I don't deserve this. I shouldn't have this. Don't do it. You might fail." The "you could fail" message is really 1 of those tricky ones because of course you could fail! However, you are on the path to failure by not going "all in."

The best way, the easiest way to overcome these messages it is with coaching because these messages show up powerfully all the time. Resistance, as they said in Star Trek is futile and is also powerful. It can be the big difference between you losing professionally and personally.

It can be the difference between you having the job, career, business or relationship that you want or having your fear run you and keep you from being effective.

My encouragement to you is to get a coach to help you. If you visit NoBSCoachingAdvice.com in follow the link below, schedule some time with me. Let's get acquainted. Let me see if I can help you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

Ready to schedule your first coaching call?

How Do You Use LinkedIn?

Find Jobs Your LinkedIn Connections Can Refer You To | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 608 LinkedIn was originally started to help people be referred to jobs by people that you knew.  Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains where this function is on LinkedIn.

 

Summary

This is a LinkedIn to that I know too few people use.

In the current version of LinkedIn, if you click on the tab on top for jobs, you are taken to a page that says, "Jobs You May Be Interested In." That is as far as most people get.

However, if you scroll down below that is a section that says, "Discover Jobs In Your Network." Reach out to your connections for referrals.

This was the original purpose of LinkedIn-- to have connections that can provide you with entrée to organizations that are hiring. That's really what this section is about.

There are people in your network who would (1) profit by doing the referral because there's an employee referral bonus that many of these people would receive and (2) you get the benefit of their recommendation because it is believed that they know something about you.

Check out "Discover Jobs In Your Network" by clicking on the jobs tab and by scrolling below the top item to this 2nd area, reach out your connections for a referral.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Why You Lose Potential New Hires (VIDEO)


In this video I discuss how employers lose potential employees that they wanted to hire.

Summary

I thought I would do something for employers, hiring managers to help you understand why you lose potential new hires that you really want to bring on board. It really starts off with a couple of things that float around the kind of build on themselves.

First of all, you have unrealistic expectations and then construct incomplete/inaccurate/over-the-top job descriptions they could make it really hard for you to get to people who you would want to hire in the 1st place.

You take too long in the selection process. Why? Not everyone is on board with what they are assigned to look for. As a result, some people are screaming against their idea of what is being sought versus your idea of what you need is. Thus, there is confusion. Sometimes in the attempted rigorous process. You don't tell the person who is going to be screening for you what you want them to screen for. As a result, when someone magically makes it through this over interviewed process, they are turned off. They don't really like what their experience has been. No one has sold them on the opportunity at any point and, if they have, it hasn't been repeatedly reinforced, nor the person reminded of it throughout the process. They forget because it happened so long ago.

Thus, from the job hunter perspective, you have had too many cooks pounding them from different directions. You may say, "So what? We are learning!" Yet, when you are hiring someone, everything that you are doing, just like everything they are doing creates an image. You are asking to get it passed, but you wouldn't give a job Hunter repass if they did that to you, right?

You have to reconstruct your approach to this by shortening the hiring process, getting clear about what you are looking for, making it clear to everyone who is involved in the process what you want them to evaluate for . . . Do you follow that?

You try to do all this and is concise and manner as is possible and as few visits as possible because, even in down markets, you are competing with other firms that are looking for talent. If the other firm is streamlining the process as many firms are, then, you will be coming in late. You are coming in after someone else has already done a better job of "selling" them.

When you over interview, when you are not clear with everyone about what you want them to assess for, it is like going to a bad party (at least from a job hunter's perspective). They are in the center of the circle and everyone is taking shots at them and they have no idea what is going on.

When you finally extended offer, (1) you are now competing with people and (2) as a result of your firm's terrible behavior during the process, they have been undersold on the opportunity and no relationship has really been built with the job hunter, (3) you are now susceptible to a counteroffer from their current employer. After all that work, after all that effort, you lose them because your process stank.

I just want to encourage you to follow some of the suggestions I have made here. Don't over interview. Get clear about what it is you are looking for. Think in terms of "reasonable expectations" and get everyone on board with what it is THEY, in particular, will be involved with interviewing and assessing for. No more. No less..

When they give you feedback (and this is a big part of it), "Are they qualified?" Once you meet them and use that information that you have gotten from others, I want you to think of how they might relate to the people in your current organization without using the word, "fit." After all, you do want diversity, not just simply from a racial, religious, or cultural perspective, you want diversity of thought, don't you? You want people who see problems differently so that you receive multiple perspectives.

Too often, it is used, to inject bias into the process and, worse than that, create a "me, too" culture where everyone agrees with one another and you are only receiving one viewpoint.

So, I just want to offer you a few of these reasons why you lose job applicants that you have worked so hard to evaluate and have wanted to hire. They are so easily correctable.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

Ready to schedule your first coaching call?

Conducting a Postmortem Before You Start Your Job Search | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 607 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to review what happened at your previous job before you set out on a job search.

Summary

Today, let's talk about the decision to change jobs yet again.

Many of you make the decision to change jobs in a pique of anger. It is the final straw; it has been building up for a while. You've been working on something and something that management does just sets you off. Maybe you have been laid off and you worked in a job that you didn't really care for

Whatever the circumstances are, before you dive headlong into a job search, it's really useful to take the time to figure out what went wrong. What was it right about the situation? Often, people going to the next job with this romantic notion of what it is going to be like and they haven't really investigated thoroughly what the new environment is like, what the people are like, what the work is going to be like… They have asked some basic questions but they don't really have the depth of knowledge of the new situation because they never really taken the time to review the old one.

It is critically important for you to review whether or not the problems of the old one were of your making or management's making. And, in taking the time to review, it also gives you the opportunity to ask yourself "Is this the worker really wanted to do?"

You see, a lot of people go through the same hamster wheel of job changes, looking for the perfect place to do the work that they don't really like. But, it's a job, and they feel compelled to do it. Take the time to ask yourself, "Is it them or is it the work or is it me?"

At the end of the day, unless you figure out whether the issue is 1 of those 3 or some hybrid, and you keep doing the same things again and again, you're going to wind up getting the same results again and again.

So, take the time to do what I call a postmortem. Review what your past job was like, or your current job was like and whether it is the kind of work you like doing and you can thrive it doing. Otherwise, life is a way of showing you that it ends more quickly than we like and live the life that is very dissatisfied.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How Did This Person Get Over 140,000 LinkedIn Connections? | Job Search Radio

How is it possible to get 140000 LinkedIn followers?

Summary

Part of the answer stems from the fact that, as someone who is a LION (LinkedIn open networker). People want to connect with him because he is willing to share contacts and in effect share his LinkedIn Rolodex for lack of a better term. His LinkedIn connections with people. By being a LION people connect with him and he connects with them.

There was a point where LinkedIn allow people to have more connections than they do now.  I'm sure he received a lot of those connection requests before you got 240,000. Since then, LinkedIn shut down the maximum number of connections to 30,000. So, in theory, he only has 30,000 connections.  Like others, he has gotten trimmed down to that and the rest have been converted to followers.

If you write something they follow you. It's a technicality that allows people to still remain connected with others, but they are not technically a connection now. They are a follower.

I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter.  I have great advice at my new site, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.

I know. It is underneath my name on the screen.  For less than the price of 2 hardcover books, you have access to great information to help you with your job search plus ask me questions about job hunting that I will be very happy to answer.

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Should I Quit LinkedIn? (VIDEO)


I have a large network on LinkedIn but no one will help me. Should I quit LinkedIn?

 

Summary

The scenario that someone posed for me is, "I have a large network on LinkedIn, but my connections will do nothing to help me. Should I quit LinkedIn?"

Should this person quit LinkedIn? Hmmm.

No.

If you are like most people, you have collected connections as though you're making a pasta necklace . . You have been fighting macaroni to put on the necklace. You have no relationship with him whatsoever; you built up your numbers and they don't know you at all. You have done nothing to develop the relationship. Why should they help you? After all, have you help them? You don't know anything about them and they don't know anything about you.

The issue is that you have done nothing to connect with them as a human being beyond simply their being a number on your LinkedIn tally. Let me use myself as an example.

Jeff Altman. The Big Game Hunter. A headhunter, now coach, with a very noticeable brand. The Big Game Hunter. People reaching out to me all the time and 4 years, I would receive 20 or 30 connection request daily from people. I wasn't trying. People were reaching out to me because they like the brand. I wasn't accepting requests from everyone because I wasn't accepting them from people who are overseas (and I still don't accept them from overseas or from third-party recruiters).

The result when the being that I picked up numbers very quickly. Once they connected with me, I never heard from them again even though I sent them a request for a resume if they were looking for a job, even though I gave them a free subscription to an e-zine I published so that they can learn about job search. Nothing. Not a word. I suspect the same is true of you, too. It's kind of like on Facebook where you suddenly have friends because you collaborated with them on one of the games, suddenly you have a connection with them? What do you know about them that suddenly you are a "friend" with them on Facebook?

The same thing happens on LinkedIn. Unless you have developed a relationship with someone, they are not going to help you at all. Why should they?

I want to encourage you to (1) not just simply build your network numbers or connection numbers, but your relationship numbers. Reach out to them and see how you can help them in some way. Do things that will make you more prominent. For example, right before the publishing/blog platform. Do things like that in order to get noticed. Engaging groups for heaven sake! There are places on LinkedIn. We can make yourself more prominent for the work that you do.

You don't have to be THE subject matter expert. You can develop a reputation. For example, someone I am coaching now is a security professional is writing for the platform and releasing provocative material and, as he said to me yesterday, he is getting a lot of notice, not just simply by the numbers of people who are reading his articles, but based upon the number of contacts that are coming to him now in one way or another.

I'm going to put it back on you. You have to develop a relationship with people where they know, like and trust you. That is not going to happen overnight. You're going to have to work at this but judging by where you are in your career, you are relatively inexperienced and, thus, at this sense of entitlement that people should be helping you just because you are connected with them.

It doesn't work that way.

Start building relationships and start making it a network. Right now, it is not a network.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Simplest Résumé Hack | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 606 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a all simple advice for writing a great resume using this hack.

Summary

I will give you some no BS job search advice in the form of a resume hack. This is going to be a simple way to write resumes.

When most people write a resume, then write his master resume and they prune out everything that is not going to be relevant and then mail out the same resume to every job that they apply to. Like the broken watch that is right twice a day, it works sometimes but no where near often enough.

Here's the solution to the issue. It requires that you take the time to think of everything that you've done professionally.

What I want to do is to write this 1 grand master resume. It has everything in it that you have done – – role, responsibilities, accomplishments, if you are in IT, the technology that you have utilized. It also includes the revenue that is been generated by your work and/or the resume saved by your work.

Once you have that master, and it could be 10 pages long for all I care, but it's most important for you to start with your most recent job, work backward, and then create this master document.

Then, as you apply to things, as you submit your resume to friends who tell you about opportunities, I want you to prune out irrelevant things and call attention to the major things that you've done that relate to that specific job.

Some of you are going to say, "Gee! That sounds like a lot of work!" In fact, it isn't a lot of work. It is a lot more work to edit all the time than if you have a master document for which you are pruning each time into something useful for an employer.

After all, when you buy a personal computer (if you still buy them), it was a big deal when plug and play technology was introduced. What's that? All the devices could be plugged into any computer and you could create something customized based upon the need of the individual buyer.

If the manufacturer was deciding everything that you needed, you would wind up with a lot of unnecessary things and a lot of unnecessary cost in your device. By creating plug and play, you got a customized system based upon your unique needs.

The same is true with a resume. You need to, deliver a customized product for every single job that you apply to. If you think that's a lot of work. Let me ask you a question. Is a lot of work from your vantage point. To do this and "risk" getting a $15,000 or $20,000 raise or $25,000 or, for you veteran people, $50,000 or $75,000 increase? I don't think so. When all is said and done, it is not a big deal.

Write the master. Create this enormous document. Call attention to every little bit of substance that you have done. Then, each time that you are submitting your resume, take the relevant parts of it per employer, pull it into a separate resume and submitted to that firm. That's what you do. That's the simplest hack I can give you for resume writing because what you are doing up until this point isn't working, is it?

Try my way. It does work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Bravado Cover Letters Don’t Work | Job Search Radio

I received a cover letter and resume from someone that exuded such bravado . . . a signal that the person is not qualified for the job they applied for.

Summary

I received an email from someone with a resume applying for a job heading up a function for major American firm.  I described the size of the firm in the job description and I received this note, "I am ready, trained and prepared to begin for the risk... Role.  Please find my resume and cover letter below."

When I post a position. I am very clear about what my client is looking for the way of experience.  I don't want to scream people out, but I'm required to do that because my client will not call me will never talk to me again if I waste her time.  That's the nature of what recruiter dollars. Where the filter, the head of the client where we are paid for evaluating, assessing and referring individuals who they want to hire who they ultimately hire and then they pay us.  You are obligated to work there for certain period of time after all this happens so that we earn their fee.

So, I received this resume for this have a function and I receive a resume of someone who has a degree (that's good), and Associates before that. He talks about then asked for team-building experience and that he has worked as a designer and business manager for a firm that does content design, video planning. He does budgeting, planning, scheduling and other stuff for the past 2+ years.

Let's get practical for a second.

I told you that this was a role heading up a function for a major American corporation.  This person entitles themselves as, "designer and business manager."  Not exactly a fit so far from what little I've told you about the job.  It doesn't sound that way to you, right?  It doesn't sound that way to me either.

I'll simply say that as the teaching piece here, make a case for your candidacy.  The bravado assertion is the 1st single to me as a reader that this person is not qualified.  People who actually are. Never talk that way.  They always speak in an understated, self-assured manner, not with that sort of BS bravado that says, "hey, I can do that job.  I'm trained."  It is never that way.

I've only done this for more than 40 years. I've never seen anyone who has acted that way pull it off.

I just want to discourage you from doing this kind of crap because it just shows badly on you. At the end of the day I pop open the resume, I see it, and hit delete.  What was the point??

Again, make your case in your resume, not with bravado but with facts.  Make your resume demonstrate how your background fits the requirements of the job as well as the functionality of the position that the firm is going to have you do.

For example, if you see a job description that says, "Requirements," that's a tip off!  This is what the firm is looking for.  That's what I am looking for on behalf of the client.  If it talks about, ", Responsibilities," a, there is another tip off!  Where you have perform the functions of the role already, but it in your resume!  Where you haven't don't whine.

Lying eventually (like in the 1st 5 minutes of the conversation) will be exposed.  Worse yet, if you are hired, you will be fired when the. Is that what you want?  Of course not.

"No BS."  should be your mantra.  Be factual. Be powerful.  Be accurate.  Be direct.  Just don't try BS-ing.  It will always come back and haunt you.

This person needs coaching from me and I created a site called JobSearchCoachingHQ.com with advice for job hunters good anywhere in the English-speaking world.  We'll talk with you about starting your search, writing a resume, marketing yourself, interviewing tough interview and then preparing for them.  It will talk about using LinkedIn effectively.  Salary negotiation – – you don't know how to negotiate salary and I have ways that go from very gentle to what are referred to as, "ball breaker techniques."  They will help you get more money out of the firm. They don't always work, and you may not be capable of doing one or the other or all the ones in the middle. But there is advice there.  In addition, you can ask me questions that will help you with your job search.

Again, the site is JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.  Very inexpensive.  It's the price of 2 hardcover books in order to be able to ask me questions and get access to great information that will help you find work more quickly.

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

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