How Much Are You Looking For? Version 1

job-interview-intro__1303750811_5965 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with two ways to answer the question, “How much are you looking for,” at an interview.

Summary

I will talk about how to answer that great question that is often asked at first interviews, that is asked 10, 15, 30, 60 minutes into the conversation, where they look at you so seriously and say, “so, how much are you really looking for?” Or something to that effect.

When all is said and done, you can answer that question… But I don’t think that serves you best. Let me give you two examples of ways to answer that.

Number one. You start by saying, “I’m currently earning such and such.” The reason you start that way is that for most of you, the fact is (to be clear, I’m not talking about a senior executive who is looking at a board level position or senior executive position. You’re probably not listening to this podcast anyway. You have an agent working with you who’s coordinating everything related to the search. They’re handling it for you.”, But for Average Jane and Average Joe, if you choose not to answer that question, firms will press you and will give you two choices: answer it or I will escort you out the door.

Here’s how you do it. Both of them start off by telling them how much you are currently earning. Here is variation number one: “I’m really looking for an opportunity. If you decide on the right person for you, and, Lord knows, this seems like a great opportunity for me, I am just going to ask that you make your strongest offer.” Notice how you are avoiding stating a number?

If you give a number, that becomes the benchmark. If you give a range, I know you mean the highest number and they think about the lowest level in the range. So I’m not a big fan of “the range” even though sometimes you have to get one.

Here’s the second option. Again, you tell them your current salary and continue on by saying, “We are just getting to know one another. You haven’t decided if I’m right for you and I really don’t know enough about the role, so it’s hard for me to set a price point for it so I just want to say that if this is for both of us, I’m sure we can come to a satisfactory agreement. Suffice it to say, it’s not going to be for the same amount of money that I’m making now. I will be looking for an increase but I just want to get a better feel for the job before I start talking numbers with you.”

By doing this (I happen to be a bigger fan of the second answer than the first but I don’t know your capacity for delivering these lines so I’m giving you two choices), by using a line like the second one requires confidence in yourself. It requires a degree of self-assurance. It requires the capacity to present yourself authoritatively.

Again, notice what I did. I started off by telling them how much you’re currently earning and saying, “I really don’t know enough about the job to set a price for myself. Yes, I’m looking for an increase. I’m not going to take the same money as I’m making now to do this job, but I’m looking for, ultimately, is an opportunity and I just don’t know enough about the opportunity but if both of us are interested, I’m sure we can come to an agreement.” That’s ultimately what you’re saying to them.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How Do I Stay in Contact With My References During a Long Job Search? – Job Search Radio

If you do with the right way, you will establish your references at the beginning of the job search so you know who they are and what they will say and can include them in an application when you fill one out. But, often, a lot of time goes by from the time that you first speak with them until the time that you need them. How do you stay in contact? How do you keep them on their toes so they are ready when you need them?

 
Summary

How do you stay in contact with the references when you know you to be involved with a lengthy job search?

So much of this question reveals a lack of confidence on the part of the job hunter. First of all, I don’t know how long a “long job search” is. Let’s assume this person knows it will be a long job search because they realize that they are a beginner or they have antiquated skills or experience that will cause it to be a long job search.

First of all, you need to accept the fact that you will need to do work in order to make this not a long job search. By that, I mean that there are things you will need to learn or relearn that the job market demands of you that will improve your chances, instead of being like a feather in the wind blowing from place to place. You take charge of your own career and learn what you need to learn. That’s step number one

Step number two is how do you stay in contact with people? You stay in contact are limited basis but not an abusive basis. For example, you write what seems like a personal note. Instead of doing a bulk copy or blind copy to five people who might be references, and send it to one person at a time.

The subject line could be something like, “Status update.” The message could read, “I’m not at a point yet where my interviews will yield an offer, but I want to let you know that I’m still looking, keep this in your mind.” Then remind them of the few points you want them to make at the right time so it just doesn’t hit the like a ton of bricks.

Continue by saying, “Have no fear. When I need you I will contact you immediately and say,” ‘It’s time.'” That will give them the habit of knowing that that is the code phrase for, “I really need you.”

Doing it every 4 to 6 weeks is fine, just to send a quick report on your job search and where you are. You don’t have to mention companies by name. You just want them to know that she was still looking for a position and you’ll be in contact when you need them.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.= http://www.JobSa

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How Do I Find Out Why My Job Application Has Been Rejected?


I have sent out over a hundred job applications to various positions across many fields, and 90% of them had been rejected – the other 10% I never hear from again, even after following-up. For most of those applications, I should be a perfectly viable candidate, but I get no indication whatsoever why I get rejected.

Summary

here’s a question for today: How do I find out why my job application has been rejected? I’m going to paraphrase the next part. I have sent out over100 applications to various positions across my field and 90% of them have been rejected. The other 10%, I never hear from again even if I follow-up. For most of those applications I would be a perfectly viable candidate but I get no indication why I was rejected.

The person then goes back to talk about what career services told him. Career services knows nothing. They have never fill the job in their life, offer pablum advice but I digress.

What’s the issue here? How can this person find out why their application has been rejected? I’m going to answer the question for them because there are really only a few reasons why an application is rejected.

The first one is that they sought better-looking resumes.What made them better looking resumes? Well, when you see a job ad, that position may have already been online for a month and they are deep into the hiring process. You got to it late.

Number two. Let’s say you found that on the first day was posted and they have just been inundated with responses and they’ve chosen better fitting candidates or resumes for these roles.

Number three. You did nothing to tailor your resume to demonstrate how you actually fit for the job.

The most likely alternative is the second one – – they saw better resumes.Here’s what I say that.

For a student resume (I’m going to get to you more experienced people in a little bit to start with students first),

What is your resume say? You have a few internships and went to a particular school, got certain grades and took particular classes.

Man, that’s boring! Unless some of those internships were spectacular (I’m sure some of you had great internships, but most were pretty mundane), some of these people are ahead of you on line, particularly if you went to an average school– – We have no idea of your experience so it’s hard to be particular for you.

For you experienced people, is number three (you did nothing to demonstrate your fit for the job). That’s the most common mistake that experienced people make.

Students are often given a load of crap by career services about how wonderful their school is, how great a job it does preparing people for graduation… And they are lying. Career services knows nothing about how well prepared you are or any of the graduates are. The next time they go out and talk to a business about how their academic program matches up with that businesses needs will be the first time that ever happens.

So, for students, your background isn’t as wonderful as you have been led to believe. For experienced people, you have to tailor your resume to demonstrate a fit for the job that you are applying for; that’s the most common reason why you are being projected; you never made a case for your candidacy and how your experience fits the firm that you are applying to.

Your resume is awful vis-à-vis the job you’re applying for. As I’ve said many times before, your resume is like the broken watch that’s right twice a day. Yes, you will get some interviews. To use the example of the student, he or she gets 10 interviews out of 100.

Why doesn’t he get 100 out of 100? Who knows!

For you, you keep sending that same resume out over and over and, if my inbox is any indicator, a lot of you are sending out little more than spam.

I want to encourage you to tailor your resume to demonstrate your fit. As a student, I want you to go into detail about the program you went to, how wonderful it was, what you learn there, and try to find something in your background that will distinguish it from the other thousand resumes that they are going to be receiving.

By that I don’t only mean the appearance; I mean the content as well.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter going to answer going to

When Your Current Employer Wants More Than Two Weeks Notice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to respond when your current manager asks for more than two weeks notice.

Summary

I want to talk with you about those instances when you are giving you notice in your current employer turns around and says, “No! No! No! Not two weeks notice. We need four, six, eight weeks notice two months notice! Two years notice!” Whatever it is, it’s more than two weeks.

Here’s how you respond to it. I want to understand that the reason you doing this is that if you agreed to their unreasonable request (and it is an unreasonable request), it has an impact on your relationship with your future employer. That’s where you are going to be for the next period of your life, not with your former employer.

You just very simply respond by saying, “I understand your concern. I want you to know that I’m very prepared to do over time in order to ensure that this is a smooth transition. I given a commitment to my future employer on a particular date. My commitments are important to me; it’s important to them as well and I’m going to be there on that date.”

“If you need me to work overtime or participate in the interviewing for my replacement and assist with the hand off , I can take phone calls, not a ridiculous number of phone calls but I can take a phone call or two when my new job and will be happy to answer the new person’s questions. However, again, I need to be there on this particular date.”

If you work for big or midsized company, you don’t have to worry about this, because sometimes we work for a small firm or the owner is very hands-on you, may have to contend with an owner who says, “What! If you feel that way, get out of here now!” And they throw you out of your job now. If that happens, they obviously didn’t need you for more than two weeks, right? If you want to start sooner at your next employer you can contact them and say, “The person I was working for decided it would be better if I left now and I would like to join sooner.”

“Why did they feel that way?”

“They had an emotional tantrum when I gave them two weeks notice and they asked for four and I said I’m going to keep my commitment.”

That reinforces an ethical quality in the mind of the next employer in you.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn 

Stupid Interviewing Mistakes: Seeming Desperate! – Job Search Radio

Being desperate is a turnoff in dating AND it’s a turnoff in job hunting.

On this show, I discuss “the stupid interviewing mistake” of seeming desperate and explain how to correct it.

Summary

This one is about one of those stupid job hunting mistakes people make all the time. That mistake is appearing desperate.

Have you ever been on a date with some of you seem desperate? Now, women, you can’t tell me you haven’t been on a date with some of you seen that way to you somewhere in your life?

They just are too (fill in the blank). They are just too much. As a result, I would presume to know how you feel when you’re out with someone who seems desperate. I just know that in situations where I’ve been out with “desperate women,” it hasn’t been a pleasant experience.

Women who appeared desperate, in the male vernacular start appearing like “stalkers.”Act as though they are like stalkers.” I suspect the same is true on the women’s side… Or worse.

Such behavior doesn’t work in dating and it certainly doesn’t work and job search.

When you go to an interview and appears to eager, you start to act, “oh boy! This is great!! I’ll do that!” Eventually the hiring manager takes a deep breath and says to themselves, “what’s with this person?”

So you can appear too eager (it is okay to be accommodating, but not too eager).

So your job is to relax and to deal with your future bosses though they are a peer. In this way, they understand and do you understand what you are capable of doing for them. In this way, they can evaluate and assess you and see how you fit into their needs.

Acting like the obedience school trial, sitting in your chair, leaning forward (did you ever do that one when you were a kid), just doesn’t work. It doesn’t make you more attractive than other candidates; if anything, it makes you less appealing.

At the end of the day, what you seem like his desperate. No one really likes desperate. So, relax. Follow my advice about the single best question you should ask on any interview. Talk with them is an equal and explain how your background fits that which they are looking for. Do it with confidence and self-assurance because part of what your job is on an interview is to put their mind at ease and that you are the solution to a problem that they have.

They need someone to do such and such. You want to talk about how you did it for someone else before. In joining them, you don’t want to do this for the next 30 or 40 years of your life. You also want to understand the upside for you. After all, do you really want to do the same thing for the next three or four years? Of course not.

That’s why you always want to make sure that you ask questions about your potential future. And, if you don’t like the answer, don’t be a shmuck and take the job and then blame them for what is happening to you. It’s your fault then.

So, again, don’t bag and don’t appear desperate.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.= http://www.JobSa

Connect with me on LinkedIn

What’s the Best Way to Apply for a Job When I Don’t Know Anyone in the Company? (VIDEO)


In this video, I provide three different ways to find out who the hiring managers before conceding and applying through HR and the applicant tracking system.

Summary

The question I received was, “What’s the best way to apply for a job when you don’t know someone who works at the firm?”

This goes back to the mistake many job hunters made of only thinking that if I know someone who works at the firm, they will refer me and my network has its limitations and yada yada yada. As a result, people look at their network as only the person I know and obviously people you. So you have to remember that that person that you know can introduce you to some and that’s really the key to it.

Now professionally, you can do it very simply; you have a LinkedIn network (You do a LinkedIn network, right?) and you’re looking for the second level connections that you have to see whether or not there are people who you know who can introduce you to someone who already works there.

Barring that, what you do is you can use Google custom search tool that I developed, it’s a simple one LI-USA.info is the web address. What you do with it is use Boolean search and start searching for people using the tool. The idea is (number one) this is searching all public profiles on LinkedIn. Understand if they have a public profile, you can find it.

Number two is you are looking for people who might be in the role or someone who works at the firm who might work in the department who can give you a heads up, tell you who the right person is and give you a sense of what their like so you can reach out to them.

Why would they help me?

I assume if you’re asking the question, you’re willing to go the extra mile; if you not willing to go the extra mile, just apply to the applicant tracking system; but I think that’s the lazy approach.

The smart approach, the effective one is getting an introduction from someone who already works for the firm, who knows the hiring manager. So you can say to them, “look I understand that your firm is trying to hire someone. I don’t know who the hiring manager is. Would you point me to the right individual? I’ll keep your name out of it and reach out to them.”

Or you can say, “I understand firm or perhaps your department is looking for someone and I would love an introduction to the individual but, I know you don’t know me is you might not want to go out on a limb. Is there something that would help you feel more comfortable in referring me to this individual because I don’t want to go through the applicant tracking system or HR. What I want to do is just talk to the hiring manager.”

By doing this repeatedly, talking to different individuals at firms, you can eventually circle back to the applicant tracking system if you really need to. But by shortcutting the filter (the ATS, the HR individual) and trying to get to the manager. Whether you use LI-USA.info, whether you have an enormous LinkedIn network and can get to this individual, however, you do it…

By the way, there is the that the old school way I almost forgot to tell you the old school way. That is you get up, get on the phone and talk to the reception and ask for the person who’s responsible for (then describe the function that’s involved). Then allow yourself to get bounced around to different people who will eventually get you closer and closer and closer to the hiring manager until you actually find them. Sometimes if you call and ask about who’s the person who’s hiring for such and such, then you’re going to get HR and that’s what you are trying to avoid.

You allow yourself to get bounced from person to person. If they have no clue as to where to start, you might try something like investor relations or public relations and ask them. What you’re looking for something that is related but not necessarily the specific area. After all, they might have access to data that can point you to the right person.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

The Easiest Way to Apply Isn’t Usually the Best Way – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you from applying to jobs using convenient buttons on job listings.

Summary

today, I’m going to talk with you about a mistake the job hunters are making our convenience. Often, at the end of the job description, there are a group of buttons that allow you to apply with LinkedIn, apply with indeed, or apply with monster. These are not ideal ways of applying for jobs.

They are easy and convenient ways but they are not ideal. Let me give you an example.

You see a job description and say to yourself, “this is easy. All I have to do is click the apply with LinkedIn gotten.” Here the problems:

  1. LinkedIn usually doesn’t give you a great resume. Most of you right your profiles as a synopsis of your experience. So it’s kind of thin.
  2. For all of these, whether you use LinkedIn, indeed, or monster, you haven’t tailored the submittal to what the client is looking for. You are sending a generic response.

Before you actually apply using one of these buttons, think to yourself, “what am I sending? How does it demonstrate that I actually fit the job that’s involved?”

Without that, you’re actually flipping a bad resume like a burger at a fast food restaurant to the job at.

With many of these, certainly with the LinkedIn profile, many of you don’t put a phone number in your profile or open up your email address to the receiver. How was someone supposed to contact you? An email exchange? No! We are there to interview you. We want to talk to you.

Replying by email saying, “send me your phone number please. I would like to call you.” Garbage! It’s a waste of time!

If you think were making that phone call first when we have people who actually gave us their phone number to call them and made it easy for us to reach out to them, you’re mistaken.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How Do I Overcome My Fear of Interviewing? – Job Search Radio

Fear of interviewing is a common problem for people. Arguing with the fear won’t work but there are different things you can do that will work. Here, I discuss a few things you can do to to overcome your fear.

Summary

The question for today is how do I overcome my fear of interviewing?

I want to start by saying that arguing with your fear and telling it that it’s wrong, it’s crazy, it doesn’t work. You can’t argue with it.

Generally, what you’re going through his fear of the unknown, fear of what’s going to happen and being unprepared for it. As generally with this kind of fear is all about.

You just don’t know what’s can happen and you are afraid of what will happen… Or worse – afraid of the consequences of what will happen if you fail to perform.

The best way to overcome your fears by preparing to perform. What were doing is learning how to interview well.

How do you interview well? There are many different ways. The way I’m recommending is by joining my site, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. It is a great vehicle for helping people learn how to interview because there are tons of questions that are asked that you can practice answering.

You see the question first, answer for yourself, listen to how I teach you how to do it, and then practice it again. And again. And again.Part of what I teach is the theater of interviewing.

So JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is great for basic questions, advanced questions, those annoying brainteasers and a host of other questions you might be asked.

You can also work with a friend, someone who is in your field, give them a series of questions, or tell them the kind of job you are interviewing for and destined to interview you. Have them critique how they see you. Have them give you feedback. Go over it again. And again. And again. Until you become more masterful.

I want to be clear. I said, “more masterful.” I didn’t say perfect. Perfection takes time and with an interview, the first time or two you go on a real interview, you may not be perfect at it.

After all, practice DOES make perfect and you are going to need practice. So, the best way, the very best way to overcome your fear is by practicing questions and answers with people’s when it comes to those magic moments you are well prepared.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.= http://www.JobSa

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Why Did You Leave Your Last Job? – No BS Job Search Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to answer this tricky interview question.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about one of those tough interview questions that are designed to help you hang yourself. The question is, “why did you leave your last job?” And as they asked the question they try to make it seem like you should tell them intimate details of your life that are completely inappropriate to talk about an interview. They act like they want you to confess.

Playing on that, there are two scenarios. The first is, if you got laid off, you you are not obviously going to say, “I was the least productive person in my organization so that was easy for them to choose me.” Obviously that’s not the right answer from your vantage point; from there’s they respond by saying, “okay. Thank you very much.”

In that situation, you talk about an organization was struggling financially and across-the-board cuts and, unfortunately, based upon seniority you are either (A) the least experienced person amongst your peers or (B) one of the more expensive people in the department and they decided, quality of work be damned, they could take out one person and save the money out of that department or three people and they opted for the one. That’s one approach.

Again, if you got laid off to you the most junior, that’s easy. They took a seniority approach. “I was the most junior person in the organization. You is not an issue or my work because all my reviews were terrific. Ultimately they chose me.”

If you are in a situation where you were not laid off, where you had a choice, this is a subtle one.

As you listen to this, remember, I believe in acting over the course of an interview. Thus, you want to act like you are agonizing and going back in time to think about it. You then say something along the lines of, “this was not an easy decision for me. I have gotten frustrated because they saw me as someone who could run this department, be very good as a programmer… Whatever it is… I didn’t want to sit in the same job for the next 20 years of my life. It became real clear to me that that was going to be the case where was. So, after speaking with my manager and he being very clear that this was the plan for me, I decided that, although I like my job, although I like the work I was doing and like the people, I had to think longer term. I start to go out on interviews and organizations saw me very differently. They saw me as someone who had a huge upside. It wasn’t that I was going to come in and do the same thing repetitively, organizations spoke about how they would do career development for me to help with my growth.” That becomes a different approach.

The second scenario is when you were let go, when you had a rough situation he decided to look at other opportunities.

Using myself as an example, I left a firm at one point where I was a top performer. I came to realize I wasn’t getting the support that I wanted or needed to do what I do. Management kept reducing tools and I kept reaching into my own pocket to pay for things. Eventually, I paused and asked myself, “if I’m going to keep doing that, why, if I’m going to be paying for this stuff myself, why am I giving management such a large percentage? If I’m going to do that, why give management such a large percentage of each sale that I do?” So I decide to hang my own shingle up.”

Did you notice what I was doing? I was painting a situation with the story so that it is understandable from the audience’s standpoint.I’m not acting bitter in any way. I’m not speaking harshly; I just decide to explain it in a very forthright way.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

The Change It Had To Come – Job Search Radio

I learned something a long time ago– you can swim with the flow of the river or swim against it. If you decide to swim against it, the likelihood is that you will drown.

Summary

I want to talk to you older workers for a second about something that I know you know on one level is happening but on other levels you deny how it’s going to affect you and it winds up costing you your career. That is the notion of change. Let me use my career as an example.

When I started recruiting in the 1970s, the hot technology was COBOL. Ultimately, what happens is that things changed “in different technologies became the “hot technology.” Those technologies changed and new things replace them. This is an about the hot technology and what is hot in the market; it is about the need to adapt.

I remember when COBOL was becoming passé and people were starting to use minicomputers, programming languages are completely irrelevant now. They were recruiters who were saying, “there are no COBOL jobs and I have these great COBOL people,” and they didn’t adapt.

If you look at your field, the one that you’re working in now, and the changes that you’ve seen over your proof career or long career, you’ll see that things have changed.

You can argue with them and say to yourself, “I don’t want to have to learn this stuff,” and concede the fact that your career will come to an end because there are people who will want to learn that stuff, who do want to become involved with those things that are new, and desirable. It’s not like you’re going to be the best and that new thing, but you need to get some experience with whatever that thing is that is the new thing in your field.

You need to keep attending conferences. You need to keep paying attention. Reading trade publications, understanding what the change is how to adapt with it, and making the change, as well.

For you, unless you do this, let’s skip ahead a few years. There will be some version of recession. When firms start evaluating who to cut, unless you have adapted, you are an expensive item to. That’s true especially knowing the old stuff.

You always have to learn “new.” You always have to adapt, or else, otherwise, I’m going to start calling you “Dino,” for the dinosaur – – a legacy in your division. An old timer. The person who they tell stories about or jokes about at the office as the person who missed the opportunity to be on the cutting edge. Who missed out and made the decision that cost them their career.

There are so many instances I have seen of people who made this mistake, who hang on for dear life. The truth is if you learn the new stuff,, even if they do cut you (after all, there’s no guarantee that they won’t), you can find another position or contract work during the down times because you know the new stuff and you have experience with the new stuff.

Stay up-to-date with your field. Make sure your current and, if there are so many things that make it hard, to the best! Just don’t get stuck in the mindset that says, “Something else.Ugh,” and started to whine about it. No one likes a whiner, no matter what the subject is. Don’t become the office complainer.

Adapt. Spearhead the change. Encourage other people to adapt as well. You will wind up being a survivor.

On this show, I offer career advice, rather than pure job search advice is designed to help you have a long and prosperous career

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